Beginning Linux

TBickleTBickle Posts: 110Member
I come from the Cisco side of things and have been wanting to learn Linux from some time now, but have no idea where to begin. Could someone point me in the right direction? Should i just pick up the Linux+ book and begin there, or is there another path I should take?

Remember I am a complete noob when it comes to Linux so the more advice, the better. I'm not hoping to get a better job out of learning linux, i'm just hoping to expand my skillset.

Thank you!

Comments

  • jvrlopezjvrlopez Posts: 911Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Download a distro (I started with Ubuntu) and just play in the command line. Grab a quick reference guide and just play around with the commands. Build a configuration up, break it down, and know how/why it works.
    And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high. ~Ayrton Senna
  • TBickleTBickle Posts: 110Member
    thanks for the advice. I'm looking for a more structured approach. Are there any books you're reading?
  • jvrlopezjvrlopez Posts: 911Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    No problem. Is your screen name an allusion towards Travis Bickle? +1 rep

    The books I read to help get a grasp on Linux (alongside the hands on portion at home and at work):

    Linux Pocket Guide, 2nd Ed
    LPI Linux Essentials Certification All In One Guide (a little remedial but still helps cover the very basics)
    Sybex Linux+

    Also, if you're comfortable in the Cisco CLI, you'll pick up on the Linux command line no problem, in my opinion icon_thumright.gif
    And so you touch this limit, something happens and you suddenly can go a little bit further. With your mind power, your determination, your instinct, and the experience as well, you can fly very high. ~Ayrton Senna
  • TBickleTBickle Posts: 110Member
    Haha..,spot on with the username.

    Thanks for the book recommendations. I have a Safari account, so I'll add them to my bookshelf.
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Finding a distro that works for you and your interests will make learning Linux fun! In reality, it all depends on how you want to go about with Linux. Ubuntu is a great starting distro because it is widely used for many environments. If however, for a good overall general use, I would say Pradus Linux. If you are using a distro that is nothing you have an interest in, then you won't enjoy learning.
    2019: CCNA Security,CTIA,JNCDA,GREM
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  • treephrog77treephrog77 Posts: 14Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    i am new, as well. I would suggest learning the directories and the sub directories. navigating your way through the crazy Linux tree can be headache inducing if you don't know where anything is.
    also, I would look up and watch a few Eli the Science Guy videos on you tube, just to get you the gist of what Linux is all about. (like Linux for beginners) It is easier having someone explain it to you (what is involved) than to try to figure it out on your own when you first get started.
    From there, if you have $25/month to spare, get yourself a subscription to The Linux Academy and start working through all the chapters (they are in video form, and have a quiz at the end of every section) It's really useful!
    They also have downloadable notes and required reading to download to study from.

    Best of luck. Linux is like trying to decipher hieroglyphics, sometimes.
  • Muhammad AbaidMuhammad Abaid Posts: 25Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I will suggest keep using Linux as Home Desktop computer as you can Like I am using Ubuntu 14.04 and its real Fun
  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,594Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    If you have installed VMware or Oracle's virtual machine manager, I would suggest testing out several different distros. One of my favorite distros is Slackware, followed by Debian. Ubuntu is based off of Debian. Fedora/Centos would also be good to install to a vm, as a lot of companies use them or RedHat (which those two are based on).

    @kMastaFlash...I am curious, why do you recommend Pradus (or is it spelled Pardus...I couldn't find the former but found the latter)?
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

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  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Linux is like trying to decipher hieroglyphics, sometimes.
    Just like my handwriting! Hahaicon_wink.gif
    2019: CCNA Security,CTIA,JNCDA,GREM
    2020: CISSP,CWNA,CWSP,CWDP,CBP,(Blockchain Training Alliance Certifications)
    2021: LPIC-2,eLearnSecurity Courses
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■■□□□□□
    @stryder144I recommended this distro because this was a great distro to work with prior to the 2013 release http://www.linuxuser.co.uk/reviews/pardus-2013-review-1441the-mighty-have-fallen
    2019: CCNA Security,CTIA,JNCDA,GREM
    2020: CISSP,CWNA,CWSP,CWDP,CBP,(Blockchain Training Alliance Certifications)
    2021: LPIC-2,eLearnSecurity Courses
  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,594Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Interesting, thanks for the link. I am very fond of Turkey, so using a distro that originated in Turkey is intriguing.
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

    Connect With Me || My Blog Site || Follow Me
  • [Deleted User][Deleted User] Posts: 0 ■■■■■□□□□□
    No problem!
    2019: CCNA Security,CTIA,JNCDA,GREM
    2020: CISSP,CWNA,CWSP,CWDP,CBP,(Blockchain Training Alliance Certifications)
    2021: LPIC-2,eLearnSecurity Courses
  • MishraMishra Posts: 2,468Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    This site is -amazing-. Just walk through all the examples and you will learn a ton.

    Linux Home Networking | Tutorials and Forums
    My blog http://www.calegp.com

    You may learn something!
  • sasnimrodsasnimrod Member Posts: 99Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    UNIX / Linux Tutorial for Beginners - Contains a gentle introduction to the Linux command line

    Linux Survival :: Where learning Linux is easy - Another great site, if you are just starting out in Linux and you want a good overview of basic linux commands

    After covering the material on the 2 websites that I've listed I would greatly suggest what philz1982 has suggested before me and read 'The Linux Command Line'. It's quite possibly one of the best books out there that provide a solid foundation on Linux skills.

    I would also recommend that you make use of a website such as Linux Man Pages as a quick reference to linux command line options.
  • treephrog77treephrog77 Posts: 14Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    hey, another thing i just started doing once i had a handle on wrapping my head around Linux a little better:
    go here, Free certification practice exams for Microsoft MCITP, MCTS, Cisco, CompTIA, LPI, Red Hat, and CIW scroll down about 1/2 way and pick the lpic 101 test, choose 10 questions at a time and keep doing the test over and over and over and over... you get the idea.
    the questions change every time you take the test, and give you the correct answer and an explanation of the answers after it is submitted and your score is revealed.

    I think it is pretty useful because it give scenarios and situations, as well as the "what does this mean" questions.
    Hope it helps!
  • estipomestipom Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    I suggest to install Centos OS the MINIMAL version. Dont download a GUI base. Learn the hard way, it will benefit you someday.
  • Kinet1cKinet1c Posts: 604Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    For those looking to start with linux, jump in. Pick a small project and follow some tutorials.

    If you were to setup LAMP stack for a wordpress website, you'd get exposure to a lot of stuff like ssh/scp/ftp/perms/users/groups/apache/mysql and a host of other things that will all stand to you in general as well as towards the LPIC1/Linux+ certification.
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  • DoyenDoyen Posts: 397Member
    If you are starting to get your feet wet, I would recommend going on YouTube and watch Eli The Computer Guy's Linux instruction videos.
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  • sasnimrodsasnimrod Member Posts: 99Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    estipom wrote: »
    I suggest to install Centos OS the MINIMAL version. Dont download a GUI base. Learn the hard way, it will benefit you someday.

    This is a very good suggestion since in enterprise environments most Linux servers run on CLI and not on GUI interfaces.

    Having said that if you're going directly for the Linux+/LPIC-1 be aware that there is some material in the syllabus that includes working with GUI. For this case I would suggest installing the GUI version of CentOS and then switching to command line as needed.
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