Is your company using any KPI to measure your performance?

Snow.brosSnow.bros Posts: 832Member ■■■■□□□□□□
I was reading a post on Linkedin about about different types of service metrics that measures service performance.

I did some research on FCR (first call resolution) and I was curious, is any of you using any kind of KPI (key performance indicator) in their companies if so:

*Does it improve your company's customer services?

*Do you benefit from it and where you able to identify and improve on the skills that you were previously lacking?

*Is your organisation able to maintain the reporting system?

For any one who is curious:http://searchcrm.techtarget.com/definition/first-call-resolution

Please feel free to share your experience.

Comments

  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    *Does it improve your company's customer services?

    I think so....

    *** When a customer calls they want their problem to go away FCR is sort of saying the problem went away.

    *** The cost of the incident is a lot less when one tech at 16 dollars an hour solves the problem rather than the ticket going through several teams to finally get resolved. Something that could cost the company 8 dollars could easily climb to 30 or 40 dollars or whatever currency is being used. You get thousands of these request a month you can see the cost.

    *** Service desk is usually the face of the organization. A good service desk can make a bad IT department look good.

    *Do you benefit from it and where you able to identify and improve on the skills that you were previously lacking?

    Using one metric can be deceptive. If you are cranking out tickets but BSing the customer into thinking the problem is fixed and marking the ticket / case / request as closed doesn't do much. If monitored and leveraged correctly it can be an awesome metric. It can say my staff is well informed and understands our environment. They are able to route the tickets accordingly and/or close them FCR is a big one, and I think it's one I would focus on. I want technicians with good communication skills, not customer service reps who catch and dispatch without resolution.

    *Is your organisation able to maintain the reporting system?

    This data can be collected and reported on through the use of incident/problem management system like Remedy.
  • Snow.brosSnow.bros Posts: 832Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    N2IT wrote: »

    *Is your organisation able to maintain the reporting system?

    This data can be collected and reported on through the use of incident/problem management system like Remedy.

    How do you track your call center's phone calls volume and which department in your organization is responsible for tracking all the reports to see how the staff is really doing and do you guys work around on how you can improve the whole company's performance if performance or response is poor?
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    I work as a BA now for a start up so none right now. The last monolith I worked for used Cisco Call Manager to track and report the calls. We had an IVR set up which would direct calls and once the queue was selected the reporting began.

    You could look at average call time, if a call was dropped and by who, how many calls in queue, and this breakdown was every 30 minutes. It was very detailed but it took a lot of harvesting to extract the data. We had a report team who used BOXI to develop canned reports off of the database that housed the information. However I had a license of SSMS so I could go into the database and write my own ad hoc reports.

    I was a service delivery lead at the time I managed a service desk manager and a desktop team. The manager really didn't have reporting skills so I was the one who extracted the reports.
  • Snow.brosSnow.bros Posts: 832Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    How often do you work on combining those reports, was it on a monthly bases or was that part of your daily duties?
  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,160Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    We use KPI's to maintain the time from receiving to certification. At one point (prior to my being here and the KPI's being in place) it was taking 60 days or more to approve things. Slowed the industry down and almost lead to our department being outsourced. No we average 20 days to approval and everyone is happy. There are things I like and don't like about it. It's a database that I don't have access too and it's a pain to pause things when issues occur (you have to fill out paperwork), but overall it isn't too bad.
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  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    Snow

    Weekly metrics My boss and the vendor manager of the effort.

    Monthly metrics the same audience with senior leadership

    Quarterly roll up for annual business review.
  • Snow.brosSnow.bros Posts: 832Member ■■■■□□□□□□
  • --chris----chris-- Posts: 1,516Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    We run on Service-Now here, so reporting is very easy and KPI's are tracked via reports from SN.

    I am sure there are many KPI's here, but the main ones that we (as desktop) concern our selves with measure how quickly we acknowledge incident tickets (<20 minutes), if SLA's are met for incidents, if SLA's are met for general service requests (1 day or 5 day) and the type of resolution we use for closing tickets.

    The big one of those is the acknowledgment. If we blow that KPI its a big deal.

    In this instance, the KPI is really a bad measurement of how quickly we got to work on a ticket. To meet the KPI all we have to do is "accept" the ticket by putting some notes in the work notes and add 1 minute to the ToT. When we get 15-20 tickets in our que, its common to simply paste the same notes in the work notes and have SN auto add 1 minute for the update. Management is ok with this, which I found amusing because it defeats the purpose of the KPI.


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