How do you deal with a Sr Engineer that is holding back your work (VMware related)?

langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
redacted.

Thanks for the input guys.

Comments

  • MSP-ITMSP-IT Posts: 752Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    It definitely sounds like you're stuck between a rock and a hard place. Having been there 2 years it sounds like you should have at least some leverage to talk to someone superior and explain the situation (maintaining honesty and explaining that it's really not a personal attack). It seems that this is more a generation thing in my mind. I see a lot of people do this type of thing when they really don't understand the underlying theory behind the technology.
  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    redacted.

    Thanks for the input guys.
  • MSP-ITMSP-IT Posts: 752Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    It sounds like you should probably sit down and talk between the three of you and have an open, honest conversation about the issue at hand. Have you voiced your concerns to the Sr. and explained your observations to him?

    Although I tend to side with employer loyalty, your tenure suggests that you're at a possible point to move into a more senior position outside of your current employer. Would you be ready to make that type of change if the issue escalated? It sounds like the environment you're in is prone to frustration.
  • RouteMyPacketRouteMyPacket Posts: 1,104Member
    I can't read all of that but it boils down to this:

    Why have you not demonstrated that you have the knowledge and the ability to convey this fact via conversations and meetings?

    You are the "VCP" right? So my advice would be to take the reigns by effectively demonstrating on a whiteboard the various interactions between the various components (hypervisor etc.). Do you continually study to stay cutting edge on VMware or got your VCP and that's that? I am guessing you aren't so comfortable taking the reigns or quite simply don't have the level of knowledge to do so?

    I think this because I have been in that position before (still am in some regards) where I "know" the environment is all jacked up but I myself am not deep enough into the technology to be able to convey it as well as present solutions and whiteboard it out in a comprehensive manner. This is where people with CCIE's and VCPX have instant credibility when they walk into a meeting, they understand the technology and can comprehensively convey it to people like your "Sr." Engineer.

    It's a tough spot for you, I would continue your VMware studies/labbing so that you can slowly gain the respect of this person and be the "go to" VMware guru on the team. I see the opportunity there anyway for that
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  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 CISSP CISM CISA CRISC CCSP CCSK eJPT GCIA GSEC CEH CHFI ITIL-F AWS-CCP Posts: 2,756Mod Mod
    I agree with RouteMyPacket, you need to demonstrate, preferably via a whiteboard, to the manager how it would help by implementing the solutions to the given problems. Also you could put together an Executive Summary to propose it to your manager.
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  • fredrikjjfredrikjj Posts: 879Member
    Completely disagree with the previous two posters. It sounds to me like the thread starter has demonstrated that he knows the vmware side of the environment but that the senior guy doesn't want to admit that he knows way less. He's blocking changes because he's protecting his position and trying to maintain his status within the organization. A people problem, not a tech problem.
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Posts: 2,116Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I agree with some of the points made already...

    I read the whole thing and it sounds like a nightmare. And to fix everything that needs to be sorted you would have to get rid of the senior guy (who might have friends in high places), so I would work on your VCAP-DCA and move some place else - that might be just me however. I think you'll lose hair trying to turn that ship around by the sound of it!! And even if you fixed what needed to be fixed, you probably won't get any thanks for it either - so just move some place better when you have your VCAP-DCA.

    My 2 cents.
  • down77down77 Posts: 1,009Member
    I'm going to take a different angle on this one. Sometimes its best to have an outside and unbiased opinion on the infrastructure. I would suggest having a VMware partner, or VMware themselves come in to perform a health check against the environment. I'm sure this will uncover a number of configuration issues and hopefully help to bring forth some best practice recommendations.

    Chances are this may help to support your argument to bring forth positive change.
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  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 CISSP CISM CISA CRISC CCSP CCSK eJPT GCIA GSEC CEH CHFI ITIL-F AWS-CCP Posts: 2,756Mod Mod
    down77 wrote: »
    I'm going to take a different angle on this one. Sometimes its best to have an outside and unbiased opinion on the infrastructure. I would suggest having a VMware partner, or VMware themselves come in to perform a health check against the environment. I'm sure this will uncover a number of configuration issues and hopefully help to bring forth some best practice recommendations.

    Chances are this may help to support your argument to bring forth positive change.

    Agreed that having an actual expert come in would help, but how is he going to get that approved if the Sr guy puts a bug in the manager's ear and talks him out of spending the money? Hence why I think the next step for him is to put the proof down in front of the managers face (whiteboard or executive summary) and exclude the Sr guy from the meeting.
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  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    redacted.

    Thanks for the input guys.
  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    redacted.

    Thanks for the input guys.
  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    redacted.

    Thanks for the input guys.
  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    redacted.

    Thanks for the input guys.
  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    redacted.

    Thanks for the input guys.
  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    JoJoCal19 wrote: »
    Agreed that having an actual expert come in would help, but how is he going to get that approved if the Sr guy puts a bug in the manager's ear and talks him out of spending the money? Hence why I think the next step for him is to put the proof down in front of the managers face (whiteboard or executive summary) and exclude the Sr guy from the meeting.

    Maybe that’s why it’s never happened. It has come up.

    Thanks for all the input guys. If nothing else I feel a little better. :)
  • iBrokeITiBrokeIT Posts: 1,182Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Sounds like he needs to be reminded that he doesn't personally own the company's infrastructure and it needs to be run for the benefit of the company and not his personal preference.

    If he doesn't have any expertise on the subject why are you submitting the change request to him? Start being more specific and ask for technical objections instead of his opinion in general. You need to start filtering his emotional repsonses like fear of change and the unknown from his technical repsonses.
  • langenoirlangenoir Posts: 79Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    redacted.

    Thanks for the input guys.
  • jibbajabbajibbajabba Posts: 4,317Member
    Unfortunately it is what it is in cases such as this. All you can do is point things out with integrity and clarity. If a guy who doesn't understand the technology can overwrite manager's decisions then you are on your own. I have been there and tried to change things, just to make matters worse.

    At this point it is probably "take it or leave it". What I would do to cover my own back is making sure things like this are logged - as in - request approval via mail, send plans via mail and so on.

    This way if someone complains at a later date you can prove that you tried to change it.

    If you can't work under these conditions then obviously it's a "leave it" rather than "take it".
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  • kiki162kiki162 Posts: 635Member
    You'll come across a lot of people like that along the way. Sr. employees that are interested in what you are doing, yet quick to jump into your area and then point the finger. If you do move on you'll have to come across a manager that pays attention to what's going on with his employees. Instead of listening and referring back to the Sr. guy, which is very annoying. Sounds like you possibly have a silver lining with the buyout too. If it comes down to things where the Sr. is getting in your way or continuing to question you, then sit him down and set him straight. If you feel like that's too much and you aren't getting the support you need, then look elsewhere.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,721Mod Mod
    Reading stuff like this makes me appreciate my team more than I already do. We have a problem, we discuss it, devise a plan, and implement it. I have zero patience for the kind of crap this guy is pulling and seriously doubt he will change his ways. Any engineer and their manager thrive when things are improved and optimized. The fact that the manager doesn't give a damn about optimizing the infrastructure and following best practices makes me sick to my stomach. I had a similar manager and his Laissez-faire style drove me crazy. I understand "not broken don't fix it" but complacency sucks.

    As others said, if the buyout is close that may be good. Some big companies do extensive shakeups and make sure they have the best resources in the right places. IMHO, if you are not in a rush, it's definitely worth riding it out and see where things land a few months down the road.
  • ZartanasaurusZartanasaurus Posts: 2,008Member
    Your manager trusts the Sr level guy because of past experiences. He thinks Sr level guy is in the know with regards to whatever technology is being discussed. Your goal is to get that same level of trust in regards to virtualization. Once he looks at you as the go to guy on that subject, your word becomes the dominant opinion.
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