what's should I take first CCNP or Linux+/LPIC?

CaptainLCaptainL Posts: 78Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi I got my CCNA last year, fast track to present. I'm currently working in a international software company, my job role is a software tester. I took this offer because it was already months since I passed my resume to networking companies in our area and no one called me and I'm in a urgent need of a source of income.

Now, I want to get back in networking. To have an edge in landing a entry-level job in networking. Which is a advisable to take first to achieved my goal, CCNP Cert(CCNP level knowledge) or a Linux+ cert(Linux knowledge). Currenty Im refreshing my CCNA topics :)

EDIT: Or if you can suggest other cert that can raise my value in this industry. thanks!

Comments

  • jamesleecolemanjamesleecoleman Posts: 1,899Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Do what you're happy with. If you can't get a networking job, I suggest that you try volunteering or a part-time internship where you can use your skills.
    Booya!!
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  • SephStormSephStorm Posts: 1,732Member
    Look at what entry level networking positions are looking for and focus on attaining those skills. Even if you are building a home lab, you can use that on your resume. You can practice linux while doing your cisco lab, but I don't think linux is going to help you at all. Focus on practicing the skills of a CCNA while working towards your CCNP. But remember, practicing is the important part. Demonstrate what you can do.
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    I always found the Linux + certification interesting. You get 3 or 4 certifications for 2 exams and from what I have read it seems that the information you learn can be very helpful. But that is just me, I am an OS guy so any chance to get my hands on an operating system regardless of the type I relish it.

    With that said if you had to get one certification (which you already possess) that would put you into a intermediate role I would think the CCNA would be the one too do it. It's really the only certification I have seen that consistently get's help desk, NOC, even geek squad employees positions that are more challenging technically.

    On a side I help write resumes for students who graduate from local universities and usually follow back up with them. The ones who have the CCNA seem to get field engineer positions and network analyst roles fairly quickly. While the same skilled resources with Windows certifications, etc seems to bounce around the same types of roles often before landing their big break. It may just be the area I am located.

    If I were you I would recommend giving your resume another shot for those networking positions you seek.

    HTH.
  • CaptainLCaptainL Posts: 78Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Do what you're happy with. If you can't get a networking job, I suggest that you try volunteering or a part-time internship where you can use your skills.

    If there will be a chance I will grab it!
    SephStorm wrote: »
    Look at what entry level networking positions are looking for and focus on attaining those skills. Even if you are building a home lab, you can use that on your resume. You can practice linux while doing your cisco lab, but I don't think linux is going to help you at all. Focus on practicing the skills of a CCNA while working towards your CCNP. But remember, practicing is the important part. Demonstrate what you can do.

    Why did you say that linux is not going to help me at all, isn't it linux a part of a technology that network engineers study? I don't know much about linux maybe you can help me understand more. :)
    N2IT wrote: »
    I always found the Linux + certification interesting. You get 3 or 4 certifications for 2 exams and from what I have read it seems that the information you learn can be very helpful. But that is just me, I am an OS guy so any chance to get my hands on an operating system regardless of the type I relish it.

    With that said if you had to get one certification (which you already possess) that would put you into a intermediate role I would think the CCNA would be the one too do it. It's really the only certification I have seen that consistently get's help desk, NOC, even geek squad employees positions that are more challenging technically.

    On a side I help write resumes for students who graduate from local universities and usually follow back up with them. The ones who have the CCNA seem to get field engineer positions and network analyst roles fairly quickly. While the same skilled resources with Windows certifications, etc seems to bounce around the same types of roles often before landing their big break. It may just be the area I am located.

    If I were you I would recommend giving your resume another shot for those networking positions you seek.

    HTH.

    I only have CCNA skills on my resume, do I need to develop more skills to be more competitive, like knowing how to troubleshoot computers?
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    It wouldn't hurt that's for sure. Most likely you will have to take a hybrid role in which knowing how to troubleshoot servers and client machines would be very helpful. It shows core knowledge, but that's just my opinion.
  • CaptainLCaptainL Posts: 78Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    N2IT wrote: »
    It wouldn't hurt that's for sure. Most likely you will have to take a hybrid role in which knowing how to troubleshoot servers and client machines would be very helpful. It shows core knowledge, but that's just my opinion.

    noted. thanks sir!
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