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Obtaining bachelors and masters degrees from the same school

srabieesrabiee Member Posts: 1,231 ■■■■■■■■□□
Wanted to get your opinions on this issue. I just obtained by BS degree from WGU. I am wanting to immediately re-enroll to WGU and obtain an MS degree. I'm sure I can knock it out 2 to 3 terms, so $6000 ~ $9000 total cost for the MS degree.

That said, my step-father doesn't think it's a good idea to get a bachelors degree and a masters degree from the same school. He seems to think that it's common knowledge that it's looked down upon in the business world when people stick with the same school for their bachelors and masters. Not sure why, but he said "everybody knows that." He's a savvy guy and I respect his opinion, but I've never heard this. He's a business owner and he said it's almost unheard of for someone to have a bachelors and masters from the same university. He said he's never seen it before, and he's convinced that it will look bad on my resume and might hurt my chances career-wise when seeking new opportunities.

Have you guys heard of anything like this? I admit, anyone that I know that has a masters degree obtained it from a different institution than where they obtained their bachelors degree. I just don't understand why that's a big deal. I love WGU's pedagogy, and the tuition is dirt-cheap. I'd really like to stick with WGU for my graduate degree, but his advice about it being a bad idea and "common knowledge" has me confused.

Thoughts?
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    AverageJoeAverageJoe Member Posts: 316 ■■■■□□□□□□
    There are those who say you shouldn't get your master's where you earned your undergrad degree. One reason I've heard for attending a different school for your graduate degree is a broadened perspective.

    I think there's been a shift towards continued education at the same school over the last decade or so, though. Even as many colleges and universities have increased their online presence, many schools have also started offering 5-year combined bachelor's/master's programs to entice staying put for both degrees.

    Can you imagine sitting in a job interview where the interviewer says, "Oh, too bad. You were a perfect fit, but I just noticed you received your master's degree from the same school that granted your bachelor's degree"...? Maybe it happens, but I can't picture it. I don't think there's anything wrong with going to the same school for multiple degrees.

    Just an average Joe
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    CyberfiSecurityCyberfiSecurity Member Posts: 184
    Your dad is right about that. Usually people get degrees from different schools because of the school reputations and expand the networking. Do employers care? Not really, but it looks better in your resume and you can be the alumnus of XYZ University and University of ZYX. My best friend got BS, MS and Grduate Certificate from GMU; and they serves him well.

    I did climb the institutional reputation ladder. Troy University, Southern Methodist Univesity and Georgetown University.
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    N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    My gut says it's not good or bad, it's a non factor. My personal opinion is it's a good thing. It shows commitment and dedication and that you thought highly enough of the bachelors program to return back to the masters.
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    Tom ServoTom Servo Member Posts: 104 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Generally speaking, unless you plan to be a professor, or really hope to work in academics, most businesses wouldn't consider it a deal breaker or anything to have the same school for your Bachelors and Masters. Universities care a bit about it, especially if you plan to work as a researcher/in some kind of a lab.
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    GAngelGAngel Member Posts: 708 ■■■■□□□□□□
    That's an academia issue not a business world problem. Mainly for future PHD students who did there undergrad at the same school. It's much harder to get into your own school than any of the others. It's also a tier one issue never really mattered lower than the very top schools.
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    iBrokeITiBrokeIT Member Posts: 1,318 ■■■■■■■■■□
    AverageJoe wrote: »
    Can you imagine sitting in a job interview where the interviewer says, "Oh, too bad. You were a perfect fit, but I just noticed you received your master's degree from the same school that granted your bachelor's degree"...?

    That's an excellent point. Do you really want to work for an employer that is going to nitpick at your resume over something trivial vs judging you on the knowledge and skills that you actually obtained?

    It wouldn't hurt to evaluate MS degrees from other schools like Dakota State University if you haven't already done so.
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    auxiliarypriestauxiliarypriest Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Yes I've hear this, but it's not really a big deal unless you are going into teaching or research. It's also becoming more common especially with so many people attending non-traditional schools.

    As a WGU student I completely understand. I absolutely love how the school works in my situation. I was considering the master's program wth WGU (MSIA), but I have ultimately decided against WGU, even though the pacing and cost is so appealing. My reason, new experience and I want more from the actual master's program (I don't want to step on toes, but the program seems a bit light). Some other factors were having actual professors and job networking benefits.

    Whatever you choose to do, Good Luck.
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    datacombossdatacomboss Member Posts: 304 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Those rules USED to only apply to schools outside of the top 50 or so.

    Personally, I think you should try to go up a level or so in prestige, but in the long run it doesn't matter unless you plan on being a professor or researcher.
    "If I were to say, 'God, why me?' about the bad things, then I should have said, 'God, why me?' about the good things that happened in my life."

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    iBrokeITiBrokeIT Member Posts: 1,318 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Those rules USED to only apply to schools outside of the top 50 or so.

    Personally, I think you should try to go up a level or so in prestige, but in the long run it doesn't matter unless you plan on being a professor or researcher.

    Does prestige really matter or count for anything in IT? All else being equal between potential job candidates sure, maybe but how often will that happen? Personally I think the ROI for prestige isn't worth it in the IT field.
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    daviddwsdaviddws Member Posts: 303 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I don't think its a dealbreaker, but I can see how it could be viewed as a bit odd. In the end co-workers wouldn't think any less of you.
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    the_Grinchthe_Grinch Member Posts: 4,165 ■■■■■■■■■■
    I agree with what was stated above: in Business no one cares. In academia, it has lost the stigma that it use to carry since a lot of schools have added five year Masters programs. My suggestion is if you plan to teach (and most definitely if you plan to go for a PhD) then go to a different school. The idea is to get a different perspective and learn from different people.
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    LinuxNerdLinuxNerd Member Posts: 83 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I'm getting my PhD from the same school that I'll have my MBA and I don't care because my resume will just say PhD in Management Information Systems with details on the PhD aspects/research.


    If you list your Master's why even list your Bachelor's unless they ask?
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    TeKniquesTeKniques Member Posts: 1,262 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I don't think it really matters in the long run - it really just depends if the college has the offerings you're looking for in a graduate program.
    LinuxNerd wrote: »
    If you list your Master's why even list your Bachelor's unless they ask?

    I agree if you have your bachelors in the same area of study, but what if you have two different areas of study? Here's a decent example:

    Bachelor's degree in Computer Science
    MBA

    In this example, I think it diversifies yourself in a positive way that would give you an advantage.
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    N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Good points guys I have been tempted to leave my bachelors off it is basically the same as my MBA. It takes up space and shows how old I am which for me is a concern or beginning to become a concern. Leaving the bachelors off is a huge deal for me. I think I will start doing that.
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    Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,310 ■■■■■■■■□□
    N2IT wrote: »
    Good points guys I have been tempted to leave my bachelors off it is basically the same as my MBA. It takes up space and shows how old I am which for me is a concern or beginning to become a concern. Leaving the bachelors off is a huge deal for me. I think I will start doing that.

    Maybe just don't list graduation dates? I don't list graduation dates on my resume.
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    ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Danielm7 wrote: »
    Maybe just don't list graduation dates? I don't list graduation dates on my resume.

    Is that becoming common practice?
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    RaisinRaisin Member Posts: 136
    I say go ahead and stay with WGU if you love their program. The majority of employers won't care, and you can always add some flavor to your education with a certificate program. Many prestigious schools are starting to offer some certificates which would look pretty nice on a resume.
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    AverageJoeAverageJoe Member Posts: 316 ■■■■□□□□□□
    From a different perspective, you should also consider long term goals.

    Probably most of us agree that it doesn't make a lot of difference for lower level or even medium level jobs, but if you happen to have loftier thoughts and hope to be a senior manager / CISO / CIO / whatever some day, then it may be worth investing in that future now. It's not that I think going to the same school (by itself) will prevent a good person from getting that senior job, but any distractor is unwelcome when the stakes are high. If choosing a different school would make you even a smidgen more competitive then that should be weighed as part of the decision making process.
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    RaisinRaisin Member Posts: 136
    AverageJoe wrote: »
    Probably most of us agree that it doesn't make a lot of difference for lower level or even medium level jobs, but if you happen to have loftier thoughts and hope to be a senior manager / CISO / CIO / whatever some day, then it may be worth investing in that future now.

    Odds are if the OP ever decides to climb the management latter he's going to be shopping around for an MBA, which he can take at a different school than WGU.
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    AverageJoeAverageJoe Member Posts: 316 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Raisin wrote: »
    Odds are if the OP ever decides to climb the management latter he's going to be shopping around for an MBA, which he can take at a different school than WGU.

    Exactly my point. If you think you'll want to have an MBA (or any particular degree) later, you should make that part of your decision process now. Again, my point is not what the final decision should be... only the OP can decide that. I'm just saying long term goals should be part of the calculus in making the decision.
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    LinuxNerdLinuxNerd Member Posts: 83 ■■□□□□□□□□
    TeKniques wrote: »
    I don't think it really matters in the long run - it really just depends if the college has the offerings you're looking for in a graduate program.



    I agree if you have your bachelors in the same area of study, but what if you have two different areas of study? Here's a decent example:

    Bachelor's degree in Computer Science
    MBA

    In this example, I think it diversifies yourself in a positive way that would give you an advantage.

    Yeah great point. List em' both if it's an advantage.
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    mokaibamokaiba Member Posts: 162 ■■■□□□□□□□
    AverageJoe wrote: »
    There are those who say you shouldn't get your master's where you earned your undergrad degree.


    ^This.

    It looks best when you have an Associates, Bachelors, Masters, and PhD all from different schools. It gives that well-rounded renaissance man look.
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    N2ITN2IT Inactive Imported Users Posts: 7,483 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Danielm7 wrote: »
    Maybe just don't list graduation dates? I don't list graduation dates on my resume.

    I wish it was that simple, most application processes will get you sooner or later. They ask for your bachelors and then you have to list it in the HR application system. If you list it date is always a required field and then they have you locked into how old you are.

    I just omit it and go with my Masters. They sometimes will ask and I usually keep it high level and let them know it's a bachelors of science from my school. It usually ends after that.
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    UnixGuyUnixGuy Mod Posts: 4,567 Mod
    Danielm7 wrote: »
    Maybe just don't list graduation dates? I don't list graduation dates on my resume.

    +1 this. There is no need to list dates. If they ask you about graduation dates (which I doubt they will), you can tell the truth then. No big deal.


    I would list both degrees.
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    blinkme323blinkme323 Member Posts: 24 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Like some others have said, I think this mainly applies in cases where a) you're going for your PHD and b) you have plans to become a professor or something of that ilk.
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    aspiringsoulaspiringsoul Member Posts: 314
    Like the others mentioned, I do not see any issues outside of academia.

    In IT, work experience is king, then relevant certifications, and then your degree (although some hiring managers may be biased).
    Education: MS-Information Security and Assurance from Western Governors University, BS-Business Information Systems from Indiana Wesleyan University, AAS-Computer Network Systems - ITT Tech,
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    PolynomialPolynomial Member Posts: 365
    In IT, work experience is king, then relevant certifications, and then your degree (although some hiring managers may be biased).

    This really is not always the case due to the vast array of different kinds of IT jobs.
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