Which type of MCSA certification is related to Networking?

As someone who is planning to get into networking, which MCP or MCSA cert is most related to a networking career or CCNA? My immediate guess is the MCSA: Server 2012 certification.

Comments

  • 65026502 Posts: 41Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I can't recommend MCSA if you are going into pure networking. Today's MCSA is mostly about memorizing little details of Microsoft Server that you would rarely if ever use in real life. MCSA will barely touch a few subnetting or IPv6 trivia questions that the CCNA will cover better and in more detail.
  • srabieesrabiee Posts: 1,231Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I agree. Microsoft certs aren't going to touch much on the realm of networking outside of configuring Microsoft server roles and role services.

    CCENT/CCNA is where you want to begin your networking journey.

    If you want to be more of a JOAT, don't be afraid to take Microsoft certs as well.
    WGU Progress: Master of Science - Information Technology Management (Start Date: February 1, 2015)
    Completed: LYT2, TFT2, JIT2, MCT2, LZT2, SJT2 (17 CU's)
    Required: FXT2, MAT2, MBT2, C391, C392 (13 CU's)

    Bachelor of Science - Information Technology Network Design & Management (WGU - Completed August 2014)
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Posts: 2,116Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    If you are going in to networking then CCNA will be far more beneficial than MCSA:2012. The only plus point for MCSA might be that there are more Microsoft type jobs in your area - I don't know, you'll have to check that out yourself on Indeed or something.
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Posts: 1,945Member
    MCSA Server 2012 would be the most relevant and will cover topics like DNS, DHCP, IPv4, and IPv6. Along with the relevant topics, it is going to cover a lot of material that is not relevant. Not sure how much ROI it will give you for a networking career and at an early state it may be a distraction and a bad detour. If you want an intro to Networking from the microsoft perspective or an intro to server admin, look at the MTA exams.
    Andy

    2017 Goals: 1 of 5 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • DissonantDataDissonantData Posts: 158Member
    A coworker recommended that I obtain an MCP certification before my Network+. Most people with their CCNA I assume are in their late 20s or early 30s and have around 5 to 10 years of experience. At a time when I hardly have enough experience, I'm not sure if I'm capable of obtaining the CCNA. Before then, I am most likely going to end up in a desktop support role. This is why I was considering obtaining a relevant MCP cert and moving on to the MCSA. I was thinking that the MCSA might be easier for someone without previous experience. It is recommended to have an MCSE certification for the desktop support role at my workplace.
  • srabieesrabiee Posts: 1,231Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Obtaining an MCSE is delving deep into Microsoft technologies. If you're just starting out and your interest is networking, I don't think it's the smartest idea.

    Furthermore, you can skip the Network+ and begin with CCENT. There's some overlap there, and CompTIA certs are overpriced for what they are. Cisco has a lot more value, and the CCENT exam is one half of the CCNA.

    If you want to go the MCSE route, then forget about networking for the foreseeable future. That's a completely different path.
    WGU Progress: Master of Science - Information Technology Management (Start Date: February 1, 2015)
    Completed: LYT2, TFT2, JIT2, MCT2, LZT2, SJT2 (17 CU's)
    Required: FXT2, MAT2, MBT2, C391, C392 (13 CU's)

    Bachelor of Science - Information Technology Network Design & Management (WGU - Completed August 2014)
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Posts: 2,116Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I would agree with srabiee's post. I think you could go to MCSA for a desktop support role and still pursue the CCNA. Having both will open doors for you IMO. MCSE for desktop support is overkill, it maybe recommended by your employer but I think MCSA is more likely to be held in that type of role. MCSE questions are really tough without experience!
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Posts: 1,773Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I am interesting in networking but I know I have to get my foot in the door somewhere. I plan to setting up a VM ESXi server so I can play with a few servers and learn the basics. I don't think I will take any certifications unless I have trouble finding a job or switch my focus to system admin.

    I would not look into higher level certs until you find a job in the industry. Right now you are trying to get your foot in the door and see where your career leads.

    Good Luck!
  • DissonantDataDissonantData Posts: 158Member
    So if I wanted to get into a desktop support role, should I get MCSA: Win7 or MCSA: Server 2012? Or should I get something else altogether?
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Posts: 2,116Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Yeah this is where the client exams can help with the Server exams, and it might detour you for 2-3 months but it'll make the Server exams that little bit easier. It's tough because you can't get the real world experience before you have some knowledge.

    Are you working in IT at the moment DissonantData? You say you want to go with networking but then mention desktop support is a likely route - have you decided for definite which route you want to take or are you still working it out? There are a lot of variables in getting your foot in the door and a certain amount of "luck" too..
  • srabieesrabiee Posts: 1,231Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    MCSA: Windows 7 and MCSA: Server 2008 would be my recommendation. You are much more likely to encounter Win7 and Server 2008 R2 in the real world. MCSA: Windows 8 and MCSA: Server 2012 would work too.

    I'll say this though...those exams are extremely tough, and if you don't have enough experience when sitting for those exams, you are going to have a difficult time passing them IMO. Many people with decent experience fail the 70-680 their first and second times attempting it. Not to discourage you from taking the exams, but Microsoft writes that material expecting you to have hands-on experience, or many hours of lab time at the very least.
    WGU Progress: Master of Science - Information Technology Management (Start Date: February 1, 2015)
    Completed: LYT2, TFT2, JIT2, MCT2, LZT2, SJT2 (17 CU's)
    Required: FXT2, MAT2, MBT2, C391, C392 (13 CU's)

    Bachelor of Science - Information Technology Network Design & Management (WGU - Completed August 2014)
  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,595Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Desktop support would primarily be the MCSA: Win 7 cert. I have promised my wife* I will get that one, so I am now setting up a lab in order to do so. Many of the desktop support roles here in the Denver area want it. Of course, they also seem to want some knowledge of the Windows Server world (either 2008 or 2012).

    *I took training for the MCSA: Win 7 cert but have been distracted by the full-time job that I have. Since I received the training, she feels that I should get the paper for it, too.
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

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  • DissonantDataDissonantData Posts: 158Member
    @Asif Dasl, I am currently volunteering as IT Support. My current role involves me setting up PCs and Printers along with configuring networks. It's mostly basic stuff. I have gotten some familiarity with Windows 7 (and a little bit of Mac). I have a bit of knowledge of networking, but I would say this role is closer to desktop support. I have gotten some exposure to networking as I have been seeing technicians activate ports and I have an idea of the process involved, but it was only observation instead of practical experience.

    @srabiee, My workplace doesn't use Win 8. I'm not sure if Server 2008 or 2012 is used though. I managed to get through my A+ through self study, so I'm not sure how challenging the MCSA is. I would think the CCNA requires more labbing than the MCSA, but I'm not sure.

    @stryder144, Have you already done some desktop support at your workplace? If I go for certifications such as the CCNA or the MCSA I would prefer to have some work experience related to the material. If I wanted to go for CCNA, I would want some experience working with (Cisco) routers and switches. If I wanted to go for MCSA, I would like to work with certain areas of the Win 7 OS such as setting up remote access. The experience I have is very basic, but it is a good starting point.

    At this point I am focusing on obtaining a paid position. I will take a desktop or network support role. I just think that network support may require more experience and I am more likely to obtain a desktop/help desk position first.
  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,595Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    @DissonantData...at my part time job I deal with a lot of Windows 7 issues, but not the ones that are focused on for the MCSA. My full time job is in a NOC, so I deal with network issues.

    You know, I don't think there is more or less labbing to do with either MCSA or CCNA. It is an apples to oranges comparison. Some people will need more time than others, just like everything else. Each would be a challenge and a major milestone for any IT career. I have started reading Darril Gibson's Windows 7 Desktop Support and Administration: Real World Skills for MCITP Certification and Beyond (Exams 70-685 and 70-686). It has actually made me much more interested in getting my MCSA: Windows 7 cert. Highly recommend it.
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

    Connect With Me || My Blog Site || Follow Me
  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    I thought A+ was the heavy hitter certification for deskside / desktop support. If not why get it?
  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,595Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    @N2IT...I can only speak for the market I am in (Denver). The A+ and MCSA: Windows 7 (or demonstrated experience supporting Windows desktop OSes) are the keys to get the interview.
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

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  • N2ITN2IT Posts: 7,483Inactive Imported Users
    It's been a while so I am not the leading authority on landing a desktop support position that's for sure.

    You used to be able to get one with just A+. Maybe the MCSA Win 7 is the new A+.

    Thanks for the heads up, I wasn't aware that Microsoft had gained that much traction in the desktop / deskside certification world.
  • srabieesrabiee Posts: 1,231Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    The MCSA: Win7 exams are about 20x more difficult than the A+ exams, so hopefully not.
    WGU Progress: Master of Science - Information Technology Management (Start Date: February 1, 2015)
    Completed: LYT2, TFT2, JIT2, MCT2, LZT2, SJT2 (17 CU's)
    Required: FXT2, MAT2, MBT2, C391, C392 (13 CU's)

    Bachelor of Science - Information Technology Network Design & Management (WGU - Completed August 2014)
  • Asif DaslAsif Dasl Posts: 2,116Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I just had a quick check of Desktop Support positions in Ireland and a lot of them ask for strong Active Directory knowledge which would say to me a Server MCSA would be a good thing. Maybe checking what positions look for in your local area might be a good idea, not just catering for your current employer's requirements.

    There are slightly higher job requirements in Europe as you are expected to know a lot more, so maybe in the U.S. MCSA:Win7 would get you a desktop support gig.

    Good luck with whatever you choose to do DissonantData!
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