this exam is a joke

hackhack Posts: 2Member ■□□□□□□□□□
seriously, alot of the example questions were asking you the default locations of various config files.

anyone who has used linux knows that every @#$@#$ distro chooses its own places for those config files to go. god knows where they are.

and why the hell does memorizing that BS make you somehow 'good at linux'?

Comments

  • keatronkeatron Posts: 1,208Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    hack wrote:
    seriously, alot of the example questions were asking you the default locations of various config files.
    ok...
    hack wrote:
    anyone who has used linux knows that every @#$@#$ distro chooses its own places for those config files to go. god knows where they are.
    Really, and for some reason I thought Redhat and Suse had pretty much the same location for most config files, but hey I'm no Linux guru.
    hack wrote:
    and why the hell does memorizing that BS make you somehow 'good at linux'?
    Who ever said it makes you "good at Linux". Linux+ is an entry level cert buddy. It no more makes you good at Linux than A+ makes you a good PC maintenance person.
  • remyforbes777remyforbes777 Posts: 499Member
    The Linux + exam is Red Hat based with a little Debian thrown in. The config files for those two distros and mainly any distro I have seen is in the /etc directory mainly under the name of the app.
  • milliampmilliamp Posts: 135Member
    It has been a while since I took the exam but I don't remember too many (if any) questions on config file locations that were distro specific.
  • exkor5000exkor5000 Posts: 54Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    hack is right about locations

    it is a problem with distros.

    for example in redhad stores its boot config in directories while many other distros (those that are more unix oriented) store those in separate files.

    This prevents many software such as VMWare install properly on some distros such as Slackware.

    and yea Linux+ is very flat basic knowledge, doesnt mean you are a guru if you have it.

    X
  • Gennosuke HIGAKIGennosuke HIGAKI Posts: 68Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I had been worried a similar case. Main difference on distro is due to either BSD or System V scheme. Typically, Slackware keeps the former and RedHat does the latter. Major differences are on boot and daemon processes, location of major application and their config file locations e.g., /usr/local vs. /etc, and package management, simple tarball or nasty RPM. In early stage of Linux development, Slackware was dominant but RedHat caught up and almost took the place. When I tried the latter first, I gave it up since it was too complicated for me then. I somehow learned the both. If you like “growing” your own Linux, BSD styled ones would be appropriate. If you try for Linux certificates, System V ones would be unavoidable.
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