Would CCNA make me more valuable then a Linux or MCSA certification

Treylmoore83Treylmoore83 Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
I am trying to become more unique and marketable as a IT candidate. Feels as if the MS windows market is flooded with options and doesn't get you recognized as much these days around Texas. I don't know how accurate that is, but it's my opinion and I feel strongest at microsoft products. Trying to be non help desk and level 1 or 2 call center anymore in IT. I have some interest in Cisco and it would be cool to say I'm a network engineer one day. I run linux on my pcs at home, well linux mint 17 and fedora. Had planned to be a server administrator or work in web programming role was my first IT dream but I don't know if that's me anymore. In linux I had tried to get a bit into PHP and Python but as far as languages I get HTML, XML and Working with CSS. Of those who work in a Cisco, maybe even Juniper or Linux field explain key things needed for you to get employed. As far as time wise which certification program would be longer to achieve and be a pro at? Command line Cisco seems easier to pick up then linux command line because linux seems very much hardcore user type for super techies and maybe because I have been in Microsoft world and find it easier with a touch of idea of Cisco like wanting the Cisco Ccna data center very too maybe making me not learn linux as easily because my heart is torn. With some direction from you guys out here I hope I can get on a career track to be more unique and valued on the job market in Texas or looking into Arizona as well maybe Chicago. Please give me as much detail as possible in your explanations?

Comments

  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    I think you are asking some good questions. I'll do my best to answer them based on my experiences.

    1. Learning new technologies can be tough at first, but practicing and studying will alleviate that. Depending on how much time you invest learning will determine how fast you become proficient.

    2. There are a lot more Linux jobs than there are for Windows based ones. People are less willing to learn about CLI because they're comfortable with a GUI, which makes the competition rate relatively low.

    3. Networking is something that almost all IT pros can benefit from. Cisco has a huge market share of the networking market therefor knowing how to implement, design, and troubleshoot, will constantly be in demand. If you're looking to become a sysadmin, having a CCNA is the icing on the cake.

    4. You may know Windows inside and out, but Microsoft certifications are tough. Which is why I believe the MCSA would take the longest to achieve.

    5. Knowing multiple technologies will benefit you more than being a one trick pony.

    6. I have no experience in web development, sorry icon_sad.gif.

    I hope that helps and just as a reminder this is my own personal experience, take it for what its worth.
  • Treylmoore83Treylmoore83 Posts: 22Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Verities wrote: »
    I think you are asking some good questions. I'll do my best to answer them based on my experiences.

    1. Learning new technologies can be tough at first, but practicing and studying will alleviate that. Depending on how much time you invest learning will determine how fast you become proficient.

    2. There are a lot more Linux jobs than there are for Windows based ones. People are less willing to learn about CLI because they're comfortable with a GUI, which makes the competition rate relatively low.

    3. Networking is something that almost all IT pros can benefit from. Cisco has a huge market share of the networking market therefor knowing how to implement, design, and troubleshoot, will constantly be in demand. If you're looking to become a sysadmin, having a CCNA is the icing on the cake.

    4. You may know Windows inside and out, but Microsoft certifications are tough. Which is why I believe the MCSA would take the longest to achieve.

    5. Knowing multiple technologies will benefit you more than being a one trick pony.

    6. I have no experience in web development, sorry icon_sad.gif.

    I hope that helps and just as a reminder this is my own personal experience, take it for what its worth.

    I appreciate your feedback and how you said there are more linux jobs or a big demand for cisco networking seem true because when i look at job postings it seems more of a need for linux or Cisco and stuff like Comptia a+ or mcsa just basically may take you to a repair shop or get you calls for a 3-6 month contract at a low pay rate. I think linux is interesting to run as I signed up to do the Linux + and want to get into Red Hat RHCSA but I feel that could be a long term goal and that If CCNA could help me get into a NOC or data center role that would be great or maybe even back in the gaming industry. What is your opinion?
  • datacombossdatacomboss Posts: 303Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Trey,

    I think you have the right idea. I think in five years the data center will be completely "software defined" but the networking knowledge you'll learn from CCNA will transfer, so get the CCNA and then RHSA followed by VMware VCP and EMC and/or NetApp storage certs.
    "If I were to say, 'God, why me?' about the bad things, then I should have said, 'God, why me?' about the good things that happened in my life."

    Arthur Ashe

  • Theegg911Theegg911 Posts: 124Member
    You really need to ask yourself if you want to be a Network Admin or Server Admin. MCSA is geared towards the Server portion and CCNA will lead you to the networking side. What interests you the most? Where do you feel you are the strongest right now? Take that and build up on it.

    I personally knocked out the MCSA and 3 MCSEs. So you can guess I am on the Server admin path.

    Everyone will have their own opinions for you. Personally, I tried to study for the CCNA and couldn't do it. I was much more intrigued with Microsoft Windows.

    So it comes down to, what is your passion and what do you have the most skills in. Also you need to ask yourself, if you do decide to do a 180 on your career and go down a different path, do you have the desire and determination to go through with learning something totally different? You can put this to the test by sittings and watching a course of CBT Nuggets CCNA or MCSE to figure out which you fall asleep through.
    Next Goal: Office 365 70-346 (Scheduled for 9/25)
  • joemc3joemc3 Posts: 141Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Trey,

    I think you have the right idea. I think in five years the data center will be completely "software defined" but the networking knowledge you'll learn from CCNA will transfer, so get the CCNA and then RHSA followed by VMware VCP and EMC and/or NetApp storage certs.

    Who believes that MCSA will not be needed in the future? If anything, I can see most networking related activities virtualized through windows hyper V and the work being done by the server admin with an mcsa.
  • datacombossdatacomboss Posts: 303Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    joemc3 wrote: »
    Who believes that MCSA will not be needed in the future? If anything, I can see most networking related activities virtualized through windows hyper V and the work being done by the server admin with an mcsa.

    The question was about which would make him more valuable in the marketplace here in Texas.

    As a Texas IT Director (was linux/Netware/Windows admin for over 12 years), I know the MCSA offers value just not as much as the CCNA, VCP or RHCSA IMO.
    "If I were to say, 'God, why me?' about the bad things, then I should have said, 'God, why me?' about the good things that happened in my life."

    Arthur Ashe

  • Theegg911Theegg911 Posts: 124Member
    Either one only offers value depending on what carreer path is chosen. Microsoft, Cisco, VMware, etc are all specialization exams. Before spending $150+ on an exam, be sure you know what path you want to go down.
    Next Goal: Office 365 70-346 (Scheduled for 9/25)
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    I appreciate your feedback and how you said there are more linux jobs or a big demand for cisco networking seem true because when i look at job postings it seems more of a need for linux or Cisco and stuff like Comptia a+ or mcsa just basically may take you to a repair shop or get you calls for a 3-6 month contract at a low pay rate. I think linux is interesting to run as I signed up to do the Linux + and want to get into Red Hat RHCSA but I feel that could be a long term goal and that If CCNA could help me get into a NOC or data center role that would be great or maybe even back in the gaming industry. What is your opinion?

    CCNA will definitely help you land a job in a NOC, since networking sounds like what you want to do. As you've seen from others you can take various paths in IT and even end up on multiple paths; job titles do not define a position, job duties do.

    Here's a good exercise for you....go to a job posting website like indeed or linkedin and search for jobs that are in the industry you want to get into. Look around at various postings to get an idea of what companies in that particular industry are looking for. Keep in mind these can vary drastically as each company has its own requirements and no two companies use the exact same hardware, software, etc.
  • Kai123Kai123 Posts: 364Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I landed a NOC job because I only just started a CCNA course that's across the road from my new job.

    Go for the CCNA before Linux, since if you want to work in high end 2nd Line and 3rd line support, you need to be experienced in Networking first, before having the chance to use Linux in a professional way (coming from a NOC perspective, Linux Admin role would be different).
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