Keeping up with the CCNA after passing

blatiniblatini Member Posts: 285
Any tips? I'm about a year removed from passing it and I don't really have any day to day duties that require the knowledge needed to pass.

Maybe networking blogs or something along those lines?

Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Keep reading and building on your knowledge. Blogs are good for that. Easier to keep up with than diving into thick books.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Get Packet Tracer and tinker around on that once in a while.
  • Kai123Kai123 Member Posts: 364 ■■■□□□□□□□
    How about casual studying for the CCNP? It would help keep your knowledge fresh and have the challenge of learning new things.

    Packet Tracer is another alternative. Spend a day building a network across different routers, switches and servers and make them all talk.
  • jamthatjamthat Member Posts: 303 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I've been in a non-networking role for about 9 months and go back to packet tracer/GNS3 every couple weeks or so during downtime..I just work off of random lab manuals and have been able to retain most of the information
  • blatiniblatini Member Posts: 285
    Keep reading and building on your knowledge. Blogs are good for that. Easier to keep up with than diving into thick books.

    Have any examples of some good ones?
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    EtherealMind - Software Defined Networking, Data Centre and Infrastructure and ipSpace.net by @ioshints are some of the more popular ones. A lot of the concepts might be above the CCNA level (especially Ivan's stuff) but a lot of good stuff regardless.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • OfWolfAndManOfWolfAndMan Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    A couple of book recommendations:

    -Network Warrior
    -TCP/IP Vol 1/2
    -A detailed switch book (CCNP SWITCH Simplified recommended)
    :study:Reading: Lab Books, Ansible Documentation, Python Cookbook 2018 Goals: More Ansible/Python work for Automation, IPSpace Automation Course [X], Build Jenkins Framework for Network Automation []
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,772 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I am struggling with the same thing as I passed CCNA in the summer but my current classes do not touch networking. I try to stay active on this site as it is a great motivator. I practice binary using an app on my iphone and hit up the subnetting site every weeks.

    I plan on studying CCNP slowly but only when I'm not in other classes.
  • blatiniblatini Member Posts: 285
    Just picked up Network Warrior. Thanks for the suggestion - and for the blogs. They look pretty rad so far.

    I could always further pursue Cisco certs but I am pretty hesitant to do that as I don't have a home lab or any work experience. Most job interviews I've been to for even graveyard NOC type positions went south after finding out I learned through virtualization. Not sure if I just struck coal 10+ times or that's just how it is til I grind up from where I am.
  • CiderCider Member Posts: 88 ■■□□□□□□□□
    blatini wrote: »
    Just picked up Network Warrior. Thanks for the suggestion - and for the blogs. They look pretty rad so far.

    I could always further pursue Cisco certs but I am pretty hesitant to do that as I don't have a home lab or any work experience. Most job interviews I've been to for even graveyard NOC type positions went south after finding out I learned through virtualization. Not sure if I just struck coal 10+ times or that's just how it is til I grind up from where I am.

    This ~ im really finding it hard in your late 20s to break into networking GiG with no actual work experience.
  • OfWolfAndManOfWolfAndMan Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Cider wrote: »
    This ~ im really finding it hard in your late 20s to break into networking GiG with no actual work experience.

    Get a copy of GNS3 (And packet tracer if possible). Find a free lab website (Free CCNA Workbook | CCNA Labs, Practice Exams and More!). Read into the Cisco documentation (Or Network warrior) and dig in. Gotta immerse yourself to get that hands on experience.

    If you want a tutorial for setting up GNS3, I have a tutorial I wrote with setup, running Wireshark, VPCS, N7K Titanium, and the Cisco ASA
    :study:Reading: Lab Books, Ansible Documentation, Python Cookbook 2018 Goals: More Ansible/Python work for Automation, IPSpace Automation Course [X], Build Jenkins Framework for Network Automation []
  • davenulldavenull Member Posts: 173 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Cider wrote: »
    This ~ im really finding it hard in your late 20s to break into networking GiG with no actual work experience.

    I feel your pain, I'm in early 30s, and in the same situation as you. Just press forward and something good has got to come out of it. If CCNP is what it takes to get into an entry-level networking position, then I'm going to get CCNP. I do hope CCNA will get me at least some sort of a tech support job even if I take a pay cut compared to my current day job.

    A midlife career change is not something unheard of, right?
  • CiderCider Member Posts: 88 ■■□□□□□□□□
    davenull wrote: »
    I feel your pain, I'm in early 30s, and in the same situation as you. Just press forward and something good has got to come out of it. If CCNP is what it takes to get into an entry-level networking position, then I'm going to get CCNP. I do hope CCNA will get me at least some sort of a tech support job even if I take a pay cut compared to my current day job.

    A midlife career change is not something unheard of, right?

    I dont think so.

    I actually declined an entry level position because it was literally half my salary. Im sure 100 % of the problem is taking a paycut to get into it. With life , sometimes its not ideal to take the paycut, not sure though.
  • CiderCider Member Posts: 88 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Get a copy of GNS3 (And packet tracer if possible). Find a free lab website (Free CCNA Workbook | CCNA Labs, Practice Exams and More!). Read into the Cisco documentation (Or Network warrior) and dig in. Gotta immerse yourself to get that hands on experience.

    If you want a tutorial for setting up GNS3, I have a tutorial I wrote with setup, running Wireshark, VPCS, N7K Titanium, and the Cisco ASA

    I have GNS3 but im interested in your tutorial, send it over.
  • webspiderwebspider Member Posts: 30 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Ok but why read those two books when you are already CCNA? What does they deal it with ?
  • OfWolfAndManOfWolfAndMan Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Cider wrote: »

    Those are. Here's the other one: http://www.amazon.com/Routing-TCP-Volume-2nd-Edition/dp/1587052024/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1413374589&sr=8-1&keywords=tcp%2Fip+volume+1

    Make sure you get 2nd edition as it has some important updates.
    webspider wrote: »
    Ok but why read those two books when you are already CCNA? What does they deal it with ?

    If you plan on furthering your knowledge (Or becoming a CCIE one day), routing TCP/IP has EVERYTHING on routing protocol inside. That includes OSPF, BGP, RIP, EIGRP, IS-IS, and Multicast routing protocols. The super technical stuff you'll need to know, although the book isn't too dry.

    As for Network Warrior, it has some realistic scenarios in there of some day to day practices in the networking field. The updated version has some Nexus setup as well. If you want something a little easier to start with, go with this book, but the TCP/IP books you'll most likely need one day.

    Cider wrote: »
    I have GNS3 but im interested in your tutorial, send it over.

    I'll shoot you the link. Check your PMs.
    :study:Reading: Lab Books, Ansible Documentation, Python Cookbook 2018 Goals: More Ansible/Python work for Automation, IPSpace Automation Course [X], Build Jenkins Framework for Network Automation []
  • CiderCider Member Posts: 88 ■■□□□□□□□□
    since I see you have CCNA:S, do you suggest going security first then CCNP R&S?
  • OfWolfAndManOfWolfAndMan Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Cider wrote: »
    since I see you have CCNA:S, do you suggest going security first then CCNP R&S?
    It really depends on what your goals are. I did CCNA:S first because my Sec+ is on the CE program, which requires some continuing education units. The CCNA Security renewed that for me. I will say however, that there is some overlapping material between the two exams (IPSec, VPN technology, switch security practices, etc), so you could do it either way. CCNA Security was mostly CCP (Cisco Config Pro) rather than CLI, but there is quite a bit of foundational theory (I found most of it enjoyable. Took me awhile to take in the IKE stuff though).
    :study:Reading: Lab Books, Ansible Documentation, Python Cookbook 2018 Goals: More Ansible/Python work for Automation, IPSpace Automation Course [X], Build Jenkins Framework for Network Automation []
  • CiderCider Member Posts: 88 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Alright thanks ~ for job oppurtunites ive decided to do S first and then move onto CCNP to get some more flavour on the CV.
  • webspiderwebspider Member Posts: 30 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Hi Wolfandman,
    The TCP/IP books(the two volumes) seems to be as very good books no doubt going by the comments etc, but do I need it for CCNP level? Bcoz the title as well as seeing the comments ,it seems it is best for CCIE level specially for CCIE labs?

    There are so many books with the title "TCP/IP" that I seem to get confused! lol
    All the books seem to be equally useful,then how to decide?

    Regards
  • OfWolfAndManOfWolfAndMan Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    webspider wrote: »
    Hi Wolfandman,
    The TCP/IP books(the two volumes) seems to be as very good books no doubt going by the comments etc, but do I need it for CCNP level? Bcoz the title as well as seeing the comments ,it seems it is best for CCIE level specially for CCIE labs?

    There are so many books with the title "TCP/IP" that I seem to get confused! lol
    All the books seem to be equally useful,then how to decide?

    Regards

    For the CCNP ROUTE, there is quite a bit of detail for the routing protocols. The TCP/IP book information is a little overkill for the ROUTE exam, but if you cut out reading IS-IS and Multicast, it'd be very helpful, as these are both CCIE level topics (Although Multicast is briefly mentioned in some of the CCNP material, depending on what you buy)

    Now, if you want a book specifically for ROUTE, go for the Simplified series. The kindle edition is 10 bucks (Hardcover's a little more expensive), and I will guarantee your pass if you read and understand everything (Although it also has more details than you need). Also, check out Chris Bryant's stuff. He always has sales going on his stuff.
    :study:Reading: Lab Books, Ansible Documentation, Python Cookbook 2018 Goals: More Ansible/Python work for Automation, IPSpace Automation Course [X], Build Jenkins Framework for Network Automation []
Sign In or Register to comment.