70-680 or 70-685 or ccna?

doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
Hello experts!ive studied 70-680 before but never got a chance to take the exam. Now im going to study again to get the certification. I mainly use professor messer's videos and cbt nuggets videos. Do you think i can pass the exams with my current resources? Also ive read some posts that 70-685 is easier than 70-680, is that true? I am currently working as a helpdesk specialist and i want to get a desktop support/engineer or field it role and i think getting these certifications can help me get that job. I dont really enjoy fixing computer issues via phone if you know what i mean. I want hands on experience. I also plan getting the icnd1 and 2. Which of these 3 is the easiest so i will focus on the easiest certification first? Thank you in advance!

Comments

  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 897 ■■■■■□□□□□
    It all depends on the role you want. Myself, I went for the MCSA windows 7 (Which is exams 70-680 and 70-686). Now, if you want to get into the desktop side first and aren't in that role, it's a great certification to have.

    Now, if networking is your goal, then yes, get your CCENT first then the CCNA. Honestly, if your goal is a desktop role, the 70-680 should be your first step, then I would follow that up with either the 70-685 or 70-686 so you will have the MCSA Windows 7 certification. The 685 is pretty much nothing without the 70-680 to go with it.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Hi MeanDrunkR2D2 thanks for your reply! I really dont have a clear vision with networking, i tackled like cisco 1 and 2 when i was studying before. Right now i am pretty familiar with the desktop role because that's what i did as part time when i was still studying now i want to complete the certification, but i also want to be a network engineer in the future or systems admin. Do you think the 70-680 should be prioritized before the ccent?
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 897 ■■■■■□□□□□
    If Desktop is the direction you are leaning towards, absolutely get the 70-680 first, and then follow up with either the 70-685 or 7-686 to get MCSA Windows 7 certified. That will make a more direct impact of getting that type of role compared to the CCENT. Now, if you decide to tackle the CCENT, I would do that after the MCSA windows 7 cert as that will be the certification that will help you grow from the desktop role into maybe a network admin type of role. Now, if you see yourself leaning more towards a system admin type of role, I would then focus on the MCSA: 2012 server certification path after that as it would benefit you more than the CCENT. If you wanted after that you could get the MCSE in Desktop Infrastructure, or another MCSE level path, depending on where you see the direction you want to go long term.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Very informative. What path do you suggest, like the one that is currently in demand in business?685 or 686?the reason why i want to get to the networking is because the upgrade path for cisco is not that complicated.and as i search some ads, network professionals are more in demand than MCP.im not sure though coz im not yet in the real world of IT. Whats your opinion on this?
  • GreaterNinjaGreaterNinja Member Posts: 271
    As a Desktop Engineer, I can say you can't really go wrong with doing MCSA, MCSE or CCNA or Security certs.
    However, unless you are bad ass at Desktop or Server you are better off going Cisco Cert or Security if you wish to make the most money. For me I like desktop for being able to design and getting to walk around and help people face to face.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    but which is better in the real world? i mean the one that makes more money and more opportunity to get hired. the 685 for enterprise desktop support technician or the enterprise desktop administrator? i am kinda confused which path to take after getting the 70-680.
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 897 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Personally, I would recommend the 686. It's a tougher test than the 685, but I feel like it's more in line with high level desktop support. (Imaging, etc)
  • GreaterNinjaGreaterNinja Member Posts: 271
    MCSA Windows 7 or MCITP EDA will have more job opportunities, however it will almost always pay less than having a CCNA as corporations generally value Network Engineers over desktop. MCSA or MCITP = Tier 2 - 3. CCNA= Tier 3 MCSE = Tier 3. Still CCNA usually pays more than MCSE as there are far less people certified with CCNA than MCSE. IMO, 686 is better to learn than 685 as it is more technical for the desktop side. To be a Desktop Engineer, rather than Desktop Support...you will have to know imaging, sysprep, scripting, deployment and packaging very well.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Really?CCNA professionals earn more than MCSA? But on their website it is advertised as an entry level, and less path to take than MS certifications. The problem is I am not really in the field where I can do field work so I am confused on how to start my desktop role, does gaining the 70-680 alone can land me a job on that role? Once I am on the desktop role and experiencing the real IT world maybe, I can decide which path I really want to take, 685 or 686. But is getting CCNA okay since it is an entry level certification but it scales well with MCSA? You think I should get CCNA first? All I want for now is to get to the real IT world and not just sitting on a desk using a phone lol.
  • GreaterNinjaGreaterNinja Member Posts: 271
    CCENT is entry level for Cisco. CCNA is Associate Level and is very respectable. CCNP is Professional level.
    MCP, MCITP, MCTS, MCA are entry level for Microsoft. MCSA is considered associate level. MCSE is associate / expert level.
    A CCNA will more than likely make more than even a MCSE because there is more scarcity for CCNA in the market.

    MCSA usually makes 50-75k/yr. MCSE 70-120k+/yr. CCNA 75-130k/yr + 2-3 days a week telecommute.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Wow GreaterNinja are those numbers for real?seeing those numbers makes me wanna take the CCNA route first since I already started the ICND1. You think CCENT can set me up to the real "IT world" with only an entry level cisco cert? I really wanna step up on my career, being in the helpdesk really bores me.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Problem is, where Im at right now, as I see some forums, there's alot of people holding CCNA but totally unemployed. I am planning to go to Canada next year and hopefully they are looking for cisco professionals.
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,772 ■■■■■■■■□□
    MCSA usually makes 50-75k/yr. MCSE 70-120k+/yr. CCNA 75-130k/yr + 2-3 days a week telecommute.

    I would not trust these numbers for entry level. You never know but lots of people start out make 10-15hr trying to gain experience. Just be realistic with your expectations.

    As to which one to do first. I think you will move off the phones faster if you start with Microsoft. However if you are interested in networking the you will eventually want to consider Cisco. Since you don't know what you want to do yet I suggest you start with Microsoft and bang out the certs so you can start to look for better opportunities.

    Good Luck!
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I know what I want to do but also needs to consider things. I am pretty familiar now with the desktop environment, been doing maintenance and configuration for the past 6years but again, no corporate experience with hands-on. I worked as a tech on an internet cafe, doing updates and preventive maintenance, fixing computer problems, upgrading hardwares etc, but I am not sure if corporate will recognise that. Can I go the 70-680 then CCNA then focus later on the 686 route? Sounds like jack of all trade, doesnt sound good for me. Still want to know from the experts. Thanks for your time sending your feedbacks here.
  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    Wow GreaterNinja are those numbers for real?seeing those numbers makes me wanna take the CCNA route first since I already started the ICND1. You think CCENT can set me up to the real "IT world" with only an entry level cisco cert? I really wanna step up on my career, being in the helpdesk really bores me.
    Take salary ranges with a grain of salt. Money comes with experience first and foremost. Since you already have desktop experience, it would benefit you more to go the Microsoft certification route. You can leverage your experience and certification(s) to negotiate a pay raise and/or move on to a more lucrative position.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Verities wrote: »
    Take salary ranges with a grain of salt. Money comes with experience first and foremost. Since you already have desktop experience, it would benefit you more to go the Microsoft certification route. You can leverage your experience and certification(s) to negotiate a pay raise and/or move on to a more lucrative position.


    You are right Verities, problem is I have a family to support and as much as possible I cannot go lower than my current salary. I think if I will change role now from helpdesk to desktop support I will need to start from scratch. Salary might go down to up to 30% coz I dont have formal enterprise desktop experience. I know that experience counts the most but I wasted 2 years of my life now being in the HD role coz companies are always looking for experienced employees but how are you gonna gain experience if no one wants to hire a fresher?icon_sad.gif I really hope that when I go back to Canada I can get a desktop role, not sure how IT companies are like there.
  • GreaterNinjaGreaterNinja Member Posts: 271
    Getting a decent salary in IT mainly depends on these factors:
    -How you present yourself
    -Your Attitude
    -How you sell yourself
    -Your Job experience
    -Education
    -Certification
    -The Field or specialties you have
    -How well you can come back and re-negotiate a higher salary/wage.
    To get a good gauge, you can use: ccna Salary in Phoenix, AZ | Indeed.com Input your City and Cert you have.
    I also suggest you put your city and then Mountain View, CA to give you an idea of the max pay for that cert. If you are experienced you should shoot for the high-end. If you have no experience, shoot high but settle for the middle. Last advice, don't be like everyone else.
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 897 ■■■■■□□□□□
    To be honest, getting a Desktop role shouldn't really be a downgrade in your pay. Of course, pay is dependent on the location that you live in, as some markets have a much higher cost of living, therefore higher entry level salaries. Honestly, most if not all Desktop jobs should pay at least the same as a seasoned HD employee, but most likely will be higher. Now, since you do have that experience in a HD, you won't be considered "entry-level" by any means and you should qualify with the experience that you do have. If you really want to break into desktop and have a heads up, the MCSA: Windows 7 is the way to go (680 and 686) as that will give you a heads up over others who may have similar experience, but no certification. The CCNA is a great cert to have, but if you are looking at breaking into desktop first, that is one that you will be fine on doing later on after you pick up that Desktop role.

    Where exactly do you live at? (general area is fine) and that can help us guide you towards what those salaries may be. But as far as getting those jobs now, it wouldn't hurt to start applying for them and you may just luck out and get one in short order. I'm trying to break out of desktop myself into something higher level and more challenging, and like most things, it's difficult to do without relevant experience. HD does transition into desktop quite well and should be the natural progression for you. Good luck!
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I feel like I'm dying in the HD role. I enjoy what I do in HD, resolving issues specially when I remote into their PC. But resolving issue by phone does not give me the thrill that I experienced when I was still studying doing technician thing part time. I dunno but where I'm at does seem like transitioning to a desktop support will decrease the current pay. I talked to the local IT in our office and he can refer me and can start ASAP coz he will be the one to conduct the final interview but the concern is the salary deduction. He mentioned that the pay is not that good compared to my current salary.

    By the way, about doing lab on 70-680, does VM and win server 2012 r2 and win7 ultimate can cover the whole experience that I need to familiarize myself? I was able to complete the whole training almost a year ago but did not do any labbing. I am doing a refresher now and started doing lab testing to really familiarize on the command line.

    Labbing on CCENT will require me to buy an actual cisco router as I read some forum posts and that is not possible for me. Best lab for me will be using packet tracer lol.
  • anhtran35anhtran35 Member Posts: 466
    My 2 cents. If you like to work with routers and switches then you should go the CISCO path. If you like to work as a System Administrator then you will need to learn and eventually specialize in Microsoft and/or Linux and/or Unix and/or VMware. We all started off as help desk or desktop support technicians before getting a GIG as an NA or SA.
  • GreaterNinjaGreaterNinja Member Posts: 271
    Best bang for the $ is CCNA - Network Engineer or Network Admin.
    Second to that is MCSA. The easiest will probably be MCSA, then MCSE, then CCNA.
    The key to being successful is not giving up and having a great attitude. My Gf failed her CCNA, then passed 2nd time. She went from $21/hour to $95k/yr + benefits & 32 days off a year as a Network Engineer with no experience @ 23 years old. I am extremely proud of her!
    If you do both certs you will have greater diversity of skill-sets. In IT that is definitely a plus.
  • David.allisonDavid.allison Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    CCNA is all about routers and networks. Not going to fix computers at all. CCNA will login to a router using command line. If you get interview you will be tested with a cc ma lab test and it's all command line.
  • doublehunterdoublehunter Member Posts: 59 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Best bang for the $ is CCNA - Network Engineer or Network Admin.
    Second to that is MCSA. The easiest will probably be MCSA, then MCSE, then CCNA.
    The key to being successful is not giving up and having a great attitude. My Gf failed her CCNA, then passed 2nd time. She went from $21/hour to $95k/yr + benefits & 32 days off a year as a Network Engineer with no experience @ 23 years old. I am extremely proud of her!
    If you do both certs you will have greater diversity of skill-sets. In IT that is definitely a plus.

    Omg $95k/yr for a network engineer with no experience. Lucky lucky. I guess I will need to focus first on the desktop role first since I already have exposure on that field. But considering the facts that there are network engineers that can get a job even without experience and get a good deal makes me really wonder.icon_sad.gif
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