Favorite IT Books

Hi Everybody,

What are some of your favorite IT books? Is there anything that you found particularly well written or helped you more than you expected it to? I have heard people mention books like Network Warrior, The Phoenix Project and Time Management for Systems Administrators as helpful or inspiring. What's on the bookshelves of the TechExams crowd?

Here's a few a mine:

TCP/IP Guide by Charles M. Kozierok
Windows 7 Desktop Support and Administration by Darril Gibson

I also read a few great general technology books over the last year, including:

Tubes by Andrew Blum
A History of the Internet and the Digital Future by Johnny Ryan
Turing's Cathedral by George Dyson

Comments

  • DeathmageDeathmage Posts: 2,496Banned
    1st IT book I read and well before i knew what it meant but loved the book would be the "The All-New Switch Book".
  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Posts: 2,735Mod Mod
    My favorite IT book was also my first, Scott Mueller's Upgrading and Repairing PCs. I can't remember the edition but I got it some time around 2000 I think. I think almost any IT person has or has seen this book at some point.
    Have: CISSP, CISM, CISA, CRISC, GCIA, GSEC, CCSP, CCSK, AWS CCP, CEHv8, CHFIv8, ITIL-F, MS Cyber Security - USF, BSBA - UF, MSISA - WGU
    Currently Working On: eJPT, Learning: Linux/CLI, Git, Python, Pentesting
    Next Up:​ eJPT, eCPPTv2, OSCP
    Studying:​ Code Academy (CLI, Git, Python), eLearnSecurity PTSv3
  • DevilWAHDevilWAH Posts: 2,996Member
    JoJoCal19 wrote: »
    My favorite IT book was also my first, Scott Mueller's Upgrading and Repairing PCs. I can't remember the edition but I got it some time around 2000 I think. I think almost any IT person has or has seen this book at some point.

    I remember borrowing a book from a library when i was about 11/12, it was full of little basic games in ASCI, I went though every one of them and to be truthful they were all crap! But it did teach me about the locic of computers and even back then I remember thinking that if you just keep building on the simple principles of these basic games you could end up with some thing cool.
    • If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
    • An arrow can only be shot by pulling it backward. So when life is dragging you back with difficulties. It means that its going to launch you into something great. So just focus and keep aiming.
  • the_Grinchthe_Grinch Posts: 4,123Member ■■■■■■■■■■
    The Phoenix IT Project - A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win it is definitely one of the best books I have read.
    WIP:
    Python
    Java
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    HEATHKIT Educational Systems Introduction to Personal Computers. I read this about 5 years ago to learn how computers work and eventually I built my first PC using what I learned from the book.
  • DevilWAHDevilWAH Posts: 2,996Member
    the_Grinch wrote: »
    The Phoenix IT Project - A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win it is definitely one of the best books I have read.

    Could not get in to this.

    Although thinking about it another good book is "[h=1]The Mythical Man-month: Essays on Software Engineering "[/h]
    AS much about project and time management as software engineering and for people who would like to move up the chain to leading teams and project management it is a worthy read. Don't let the title of "software engineer" make you think its not accessible or relevant for any one in IT
    • If you can't explain it simply, you don't understand it well enough. Albert Einstein
    • An arrow can only be shot by pulling it backward. So when life is dragging you back with difficulties. It means that its going to launch you into something great. So just focus and keep aiming.
  • burfectburfect Posts: 128Member
    the_Grinch wrote: »
    The Phoenix IT Project - A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win it is definitely one of the best books I have read.

    Co-worker of mine recommended this... may have to give it a look.
  • JeanMJeanM Posts: 1,117Member
    One of my first books was Welsh and Kaufman - Linux in a nutshell published by O'Reilly and Upgrading and Repairing PC's some really old edition.
    2015 goals - ccna voice / vmware vcp.
  • ally_ukally_uk Posts: 1,145Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Unix and Linux System Administration Handbook - Evi Nemeth and Garth Snyder - The Holy grail :)

    The Linux Command Line a Introduction - William Shotts - One of the best introduction books on Linux.

    A Practical Guide to Linux Commands, Editors, and Shell Programming - Mark G Sobell

    Centos 6 Linux Server Cookbook - Jonathon Hobson - Shot straight to the point no fluff easy to follow.

    Linux Bible - Chris Negus - Latest version is really good.


    For anything Windows Related you can't go wrong with anything by Mark Minasi :)
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
  • wastedtimewastedtime Posts: 586Member
    I'm having a hard time thinking of actual books lately that I have found helpful throughout my career so far. Mostly I find the man pages, gawk manual, RFCs of most value. The "Cuckoos's Egg" by Cliff Stoll is a good read. Josh Bloch's "Effective Java Second Edition" is a must for anyone wanting to write good Java code. "Network Warrior" is a great followup or addition resource for CCNA. I haven't looked over the 3rd edition but I'm assuming it is updated for changes in Cisco's curriculum as of it's writing. My wife liked "The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory" byMichael Hale Ligh and Andrew Case. I believe she felt it was on par to better information then the Sans class. Outside of those I can't really think of anything in particular and I am just all over depending on what I am doing.
  • stryder144stryder144 Posts: 1,505Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    JoJoCal19 wrote: »
    My favorite IT book was also my first, Scott Mueller's Upgrading and Repairing PCs. I can't remember the edition but I got it some time around 2000 I think. I think almost any IT person has or has seen this book at some point.
    Yes! Same here, except I bought it along with several other books when I signed up for the Computer Book Club. Sadly, said club is gone but I am still standing!
    The easiest thing to be in the world is you. The most difficult thing to be is what other people want you to be. Don't let them put you in that position. ~ Leo Buscaglia

    Connect With Me || My Blog Site || Follow Me
  • robSrobS Posts: 67Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    the_Grinch wrote: »
    The Phoenix IT Project - A Novel About IT, DevOps, and Helping Your Business Win it is definitely one of the best books I have read.

    Seconded. Also, The Checklist Manifesto by Atul Gawande.
  • Rocket ImpossibleRocket Impossible Posts: 104Member
    Thanks everyone! There's some great suggestions on here. I'm about to do some serious damage on Amazon.
  • Snow.brosSnow.bros Posts: 828Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Almost all the books I have read were boring but the first IT book I have read was the CompTIA A+ Complete Study Guide: Exams 220-801 and 220-802 and it was straight forward and well organized otherwise all the rest were insipid but the All-In-One books are very much interesting and well written, I have started reading CEHv8 Study guide from All-In-One by Matt Walker, the book is simpler to read it's not too technical it's well written in a way that you would get a feel that you are reading a normal book or a novel so I find that so simple to read and easier to understand the content. [h=1][/h][h=1][/h]
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