future of data center

slee335slee335 Posts: 124Member
do you feel the future of data center and noc position are going down.

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  • Danielm7Danielm7 Posts: 2,209Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    Not that I've seen, do you have any info to back this up? Are you talking about the cloud slimming things down?
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I've been hearing a lot of data centers are going "dark." Barely any personnel on site, if any, except for security. Systems are mostly automated and the skeleton crew of upper level admins remote in only to respond to monitored events. The only time the lights come on are when [3rd party] vendors come on site for hardware related issues. And even then the life cycles of devices would be ultra short - both to keep on the bleeding edge and to prevent hardware issues to begin w/.

    Seems to cut out a lot of work for entry and mid level candidates. But seems great for upper-level professionals that know how to market themselves well.

    I would assume similar w/ NOC positions.
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  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    Personally, I don't think the cloud has much to do w/ a decline in Data Center work. In fact, I think it actually increases the need for experienced Data Center technicians/engineers. Pivots the IT model from having IT on site at the office to in the data center, ensuring 24/7 uptime to all the customers using the IaaS.
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  • slee335slee335 Posts: 124Member
    DoubleNNs wrote: »
    I've been hearing a lot of data centers are going "dark." Barely any personnel on site, if any, except for security. Systems are mostly automated and the skeleton crew of upper level admins remote in only to respond to monitored events. The only time the lights come on are when [3rd party] vendors come on site for hardware related issues. And even then the life cycles of devices would be ultra short - both to keep on the bleeding edge and to prevent hardware issues to begin w/.

    Seems to cut out a lot of work for entry and mid level candidates. But seems great for upper-level professionals that know how to market themselves well.

    I would assume similar w/ NOC positions.


    this was my thinking i'm working currently at a datacenter NOC role. it seems like a entry position more of watch dog to make sure nothing happen. i feel data center are going dark no need for NOC role mostly call up provider to let them know there down fiber equipment is bad. unless your upper level network infrastructure theres no reason to be in data center. even with uppper they could do it remotely. thats why i'm trying to get out of datacenter gig i have.
  • GreaterNinjaGreaterNinja Posts: 271Member
    I would love to own or manage a data center, but I would also say that data centers do not provide many jobs for how much land, space, and resources they take up. They draw huge resources such as water and electricity.. While a data-center business can be very profitable and economical, a city may frown upon it for not providing enough jobs in proportion of its resources it uses. So yeah, data center jobs will be limited.

    NOC jobs, however will not be scarce. NOC \ Helpdesk will always be needed for alerts, first line of defense for operations and possibly security issues. NOC jobs can be outsourced which can create higher turnover, dissatisfaction, and volatility. NOC jobs can even be performed remotely or off-site to save more money.
  • slee335slee335 Posts: 124Member
    the onsite tech are front for the clients i feel the upper level tech that handle it are away playing games till something happen and that rarely.
  • kohr-ahkohr-ah Posts: 1,277Member
    NOC jobs aren't going to go anywhere. We need people to be our first level support on issues that occur to midigate and report their findings to help upper level engineers complete their work quicker if possible.

    Data Centers are going to be around as well and yes some are going dark. Basically it looks like it went the way a lot of technology does. Cloud and data center became huge. Consukting companies spun up data centers all over and said we can host your stuff in the cloud !! People felt it was a great thing (and to an extent still is) and moved everything and their grandma to the cloud. Then, outages happen. I can no longer physically control my equipment and am at the mercy of my MSP / amazon / etc. After so many times I get fed up a bit and go... Ya know, I want to bring this back in house and leave DEV in the cloud.

    Less clients became less work and less need causing a lot of the data centers to close due to lack of profit.

    TLDR - both are going to be around but unless going consulting I'd learn route switch also after learning data center
  • Mike-MikeMike-Mike Posts: 1,860Member
    kohr-ah wrote: »
    NOC jobs aren't going to go anywhere. We need people to be our first level support on issues that occur to midigate and report their findings to help upper level engineers complete their work quicker if possible.

    yeah, I would say NOC jobs will increase. Easy model, pay several people less money to monitor a network, save money on paying the higher level experience techs
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  • LeBrokeLeBroke Posts: 484Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    From what I can see so far, data centre market is nowhere near tapped out. Number of techs per DC is going down, sure. But number of NOC/DC techs in general? Nope. Looks like it's going up. At least in my area.
  • slee335slee335 Posts: 124Member
    to clarify i mean do data center need a level 1 tech they are mostly watching the network. thats how i see it at my data center. we could possible do this monitoring remotely **** rarely goes down.
  • techfiendtechfiend Posts: 1,481Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    I would think most companies would choose to pay a level 1 to maintain the local hardware while the higher levels deal with bigger issues. It should reduce the number of higher tier employees and usually companies can pay employees less for the convenience of telecommuting. Systems Administration has a lot of telecommuting too, as one, I telecommute about half the time.

    In this area datacenter jobs have shot way up in the past few years since a large datacenter opened.
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