Microsoft certifications help

kevluck373kevluck373 Posts: 46Member ■■□□□□□□□□
I've spent sometime over the internet surfing for info on Microsoft MTA (Microsoft Technology Associate) certification, and I just can't find much info on MTA.

Is MTA better than MCP? I already have a MCP. I believe the MTA only requires 1 test to be passed, right? Is there a listing of the exam(s) you can take to become an MTA?

Thanks for any help

Comments

  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,696Mod Mod
    Only one test. Go to Microsoft's site and you will find out what you need regarding that test...
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • DyasisDyasis Posts: 97Member ■■□□□□□□□□
  • kevluck373kevluck373 Posts: 46Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    The MCITP certification looks good but seems you have to have 5 tests. Three of the tests would be in subjects I have no interest in: SQL administration, exchange server, and sharepoint.

    I've looked up some info on the ITIL certification but still don't have an idea of exactly what it's for.

    I see there's the ITIL foundation exam, but is the ITIL something around like the A+ or something totally opposite?

    I'm trying to figure out where to go next as far as certifications go. I don't want to go the Cisco or Novell route.

    Thanks for any advice
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,696Mod Mod
    ITIL is not like A+,just a 'standard' for Information Technology. So far, there is no expiration date for the ITIL. I have the foundation certification. You don't want to go the Novell route.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • netsysllcnetsysllc Posts: 479Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    MTA is a entry level certificate from Microsoft. From there are the MCP exams which build up to larger certfications. Microsoft Certified Solutions Associate is three Exams and Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert is 5 exams on the Server track. No Exchange, SQL or SharePoint for this.

    What is it that you are wanting to do? Help desk, system administration?
  • kevluck373kevluck373 Posts: 46Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    This is some complicated stuff but looking at this page does the MCSA take 5? I want to stick w/ the helpdesk route if possible.

    https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mcsa-certification.aspx#

    Are there any study materials for the ITIL?

    Thanks
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youPosts: 2,696Mod Mod
    It depends, with ITIL. My work supplied the site for me to go to learn on them. It is a pretty good site, though the practice questions aren't as long winded as the actual test..[h=3]http://www.theknowledgeacademy.com/[/h]
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    MCSA is (as far as I know) 2 or 3 exams, depending on the topic of study.
    MCSA WIndows 7/8 is 2 exams.
    MCSA Windows Server 200/2012 is 3 exams.
    There are multiple types of MCSA certifications.
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  • ChinookChinook Posts: 206Member
    To the OP

    I took a few MTA exams out of curiosity though I have 2 MCSA's so I'll give you my thoughts.

    These exams are designed as entry level exams. They show you have demonstrated knowledge in the BASICS of Windows Server, SQL, MS Security and I think they have a programming one.

    When would they make sense to take? Well if you were a technical support or service desk person who wanted to learn the basics of Server, etc, they make sense. They could act as a foot in the door or just a good primer on a topic you don't understand.

    They have 4 programmer/developer based exams. I could see these being helpful for server guys who have no scripting or programming skills at all (and there are a lot of them). It eases you into programming concepts.

    Now, if you're the type who just likes certs for the sake of certs (building an empire), I'd take them. The first one I took was Security Essentials and I studied on Saturday & wrote it Monday. icon_wink.gif. It's was purely for the optics as certifications are good for business.
  • MrAgentMrAgent Posts: 1,305Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    I believe the MCITP title has been retired as well.

    Also, if you're not interested in SQL then don't take the exams for that track.
    Maybe start with the MCSA track?
    https://www.microsoft.com/learning/en-us/mcsa-windows-server-certification.aspx
  • markulousmarkulous Posts: 2,389Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    With the certs you have now, I'd skip on the MTAs. I think they are a good alternative to the A+/N+ because of cost, but I don't think they will add anything to your resume once you've got those certs.
  • shortygirlshortygirl Posts: 27Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Chinook wrote: »
    To the OP

    I took a few MTA exams out of curiosity though I have 2 MCSA's so I'll give you my thoughts.

    These exams are designed as entry level exams. They show you have demonstrated knowledge in the BASICS of Windows Server, SQL, MS Security and I think they have a programming one.

    When would they make sense to take? Well if you were a technical support or service desk person who wanted to learn the basics of Server, etc, they make sense. They could act as a foot in the door or just a good primer on a topic you don't understand.

    They have 4 programmer/developer based exams. I could see these being helpful for server guys who have no scripting or programming skills at all (and there are a lot of them). It eases you into programming concepts.

    Now, if you're the type who just likes certs for the sake of certs (building an empire), I'd take them. The first one I took was Security Essentials and I studied on Saturday & wrote it Monday. icon_wink.gif. It's was purely for the optics as certifications are good for business.

    ^^^ I second all of this.

    I used the database MTA to prove to my employer that I wasn't playing around when I said I wanted to go into database work. After I passed the MTA, I was able to get approval for the SQL Server MCSA training costs. It also provided me with a good knowledge baseline on the topic, which I was able to use to springboard into the harder MCSA exams. It also gave me a little bit of a morale boost (kind of like how paying down debts Dave Ramsey style gives you motivation to continue, even if it's not always mathematically sound). Now, if you're paying for it yourself and thinking about the returns, there likely won't be any unless the MTA can get you in the door somewhere better. So financially, it's not going to help much for most people. As far as knowledge goes, it doesn't hurt. At the very least, studying for one of the MTA exams will tell you really quickly whether a particular track is right for you. ;)
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