How necessary are both A+ and N+?

weazmeisterweazmeister Junior MemberMember Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
Say you know for sure you want to concentrate on the server side of things only. Is it really necessary to go from A+ to N+, or does it make more sense to go from A+ to windows certs? And the reverse say you want to do networking. Doesn't it make more sense to skip the A+ and go right into N+ then onto cisco?

I guess I'm not seeing the need for both other than giving you an idea of what side to concentrate on if you don't know. I'm starting a college program this fall at the ripe young age of 36 and I already know what I want to concentrate on. My school offers both a class that will prepare me for the A+ cert and one that will prepare me for the N+. If both aren't necessary I'd rather just take one.

My goal is to do the class, take the cert exam at the end of the semester, and start applying for help desk jobs. Don't even care about the pay (well, ok, I care somewhat. But point is even if it's say 12 an hour I'm still going to be happy for the experience). Then work and keep plugging away at my courses. Right now I work at a factory. Don't see that as relevant experience.

Comments

  • techfiendtechfiend Senior Member Member Posts: 1,481 ■■■■□□□□□□
    A+ provides the best chance to get into the field these days, if you don't have experience then it's the place to start. If you know you want to do systems, A+ to MTA\MCSA is a good path. If you want to get into networking, N+ contains good knowledge and worth studying but probably not worth sitting because it's rarely noticed by companies probably better off going A+ to CCNA.
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  • WilliamK99WilliamK99 Senior Member Member Posts: 278
    You can't expect to grasp the advanced stuff if you haven't gotten the basics down. Any field involving computers these days whether it be security/networking/help desk needs to have basic computer and networking skills to excel. It is essential that you understand A+ and Network + concepts before you move on to bigger and better things. Many a times I have seen people struggle because they don't understand something as simple as a PKI key exchange or the layers of the TCP model...

    Go to www.cybrary.it watch the videos and study for a month or two and you can succeed on both those tests.
  • weazmeisterweazmeister Junior Member Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    WilliamK99 wrote: »
    You can't expect to grasp the advanced stuff if you haven't gotten the basics down. Any field involving computers these days whether it be security/networking/help desk needs to have basic computer and networking skills to excel. It is essential that you understand A+ and Network + concepts before you move on to bigger and better things. Many a times I have seen people struggle because they don't understand something as simple as a PKI key exchange or the layers of the TCP model...

    Go to www.cybrary.it watch the videos and study for a month or two and you can succeed on both those tests.

    Ok, with going with what you said would it be advantageous to take both the N+ and A+ courses at the same time my school offers or do A+ this fall then the N+ course in the spring?

    Even taking from what techfiend said, if my goal is cisco would it be more to my advantage to go A+ this fall, then start the cisco courses this spring with the CCENT as the first course?
  • dazdaryldazdaryl Junior Member Member Posts: 9 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I'm in Sydney and most people recommend getting CCNA and MSCA to get your foot in the door.

    A+ might be good if you want to work at a computer store and most of the Network+ stuff is covered in the CCNA exam anyway.
  • markulousmarkulous Senior Member Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    CCNA or MCSA would give you a pretty good chance of securing a job, but to the others point, you want to make sure they have the basics down first. I'm all for skipping A+/N+, but only if you are already familiar with the concepts.
  • weazmeisterweazmeister Junior Member Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    markulous wrote: »
    CCNA or MCSA would give you a pretty good chance of securing a job, but to the others point, you want to make sure they have the basics down first. I'm all for skipping A+/N+, but only if you are already familiar with the concepts.

    So perhaps take the courses, but skip the exams or maybe just the N+?
  • markulousmarkulous Senior Member Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    So perhaps take the courses, but skip the exams or maybe just the N+?

    For your wallet, this would be the best way to do it. Really depends how quick you're wanting to apply to jobs as this way could take quite a bit longer before you have a cert on your resume. If you don't mind dropping the money, then get the A+ and start applying. At that point, if you want to go down the networking path, then I would 100% recommending just studying the N+ then moving on to CCENT/CCNA.
  • ShdwmageShdwmage Grumpy old ***** Member Posts: 374
    If you don't already have an IT job dropping the cash on the A+ can get you in the door. I don't know to many server managers that didn't go through some desktop support first.
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  • SvobodaSvoboda Member Member Posts: 95 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Do a search for jobs in your local area and read their requirements and then make your decisions based off of that.
  • weazmeisterweazmeister Junior Member Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Shdwmage wrote: »
    If you don't already have an IT job dropping the cash on the A+ can get you in the door. I don't know to many server managers that didn't go through some desktop support first.

    Oh sure. I figure support is just a rite of passage and good experience, even if it doesn't seem like it at the time.
  • weazmeisterweazmeister Junior Member Member Posts: 6 ■□□□□□□□□□
    markulous wrote: »
    For your wallet, this would be the best way to do it. Really depends how quick you're wanting to apply to jobs as this way could take quite a bit longer before you have a cert on your resume. If you don't mind dropping the money, then get the A+ and start applying. At that point, if you want to go down the networking path, then I would 100% recommending just studying the N+ then moving on to CCENT/CCNA.

    Hopefully after this fall. Right now I'm just lowly drone in a factory. They treat me well. It's a living. It's just not the right kind of experience for my future.
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