Python 3

ally_ukally_uk Member Posts: 1,146 ■■■■□□□□□□
Hey guys

does anybody know any decent noob friendly guides for Python 3 specifically using it for system administration tasks ( Linux )

Many THanks
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  • JoJoCal19JoJoCal19 California Kid Mod Posts: 2,821 Mod
    Code academy has a great interactive intro course: https://www.codecademy.com/tracks/python
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  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Member Posts: 2,013 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Dive Into Python 3

    But most Python 2 is applicable in Python 3 (I hear), at least while learning. There's a few differences in the 2 versions, but most of the differences seem to stem from the libraries available for each and best practices. I'd say just learn Python in general.

    As far as Python for Sys admin, I don't know any material that's good and geared specifically towards Linux Administration, tho I've looked. I planned on learning Python this Autumn, so maybe I'lll find something good within the next few weeks.

    https://automatetheboringstuff.com/ Is a book I've bought and plan to get thru - tho I don't know how Windows or Linux centric the book is yet, as I haven't read it.

    Python for Unix and Linux System Administration - O'Reilly Media exists, but I don't know how great of a resource it is. Reviews seems to say it spends too much time covering IPython.

    http://www.amazon.com/Python-System-Administration-Experts-Source/dp/1430226056 also another book that's available.

    I tried the Linux Academy Python for Linux module and it all went well over my head at the time. I might revisit once I know a bit more Python fundamentals.

    Also check out this short **** sheet http://www.pythonforbeginners.com/os/python-system-administration
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  • OfWolfAndManOfWolfAndMan Member Posts: 923 ■■■□□□□□□□
    DoubleNNs wrote: »
    https://automatetheboringstuff.com/ Is a book I've bought and plan to get thru - tho I don't know how Windows or Linux centric the book is yet, as I haven't read it.

    I started using Python 3 because several modules I use are Python 3 only (Although there is some Python 2 modules I wish I had). This book above was by far my favorite, although having this one is good for understanding some use cases:

    Python Cookbook, Third edition: David Beazley, Brian K. Jones: 9781449340377: Amazon.com: Books

    I would recommend reading the above AFTER the automate python book as the cookbook will require you to possess some python knowledge
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    If you're feeling brave, there's Learn Python the Hard Way. It works for both beginners and experienced developers, but the pacing and material is fairly intense. It's part of the Learn to Code the Hard Way series, and while the full course that includes videos and other resources requires payment, the online book is free.

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  • tecketecke Member Posts: 52 ■■□□□□□□□□
    After you start building up your skills over at codeacademy.com and have a firm grasp on basic programming concepts such as types, operators, control flow, functions, and so on. Proceed with learning some of python's standard libraries such as os and subprocess, along with third party libraries such as shlex, fabric, beautifulsoup, and requests. These libraries are especially handy for sysadmin type work. Finally, please repeat after me, "stackoverflow.com is my best friend", "stackoverflow.com is my best friend", "stackoverflow.com is my best friend", "stackoverflow.com is my best friend" :) .
  • muktamukta Member Posts: 14 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Python is great language i think. You can know about it by searching google or search YouTube/
  • ally_ukally_uk Member Posts: 1,146 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Why doesn't somebody write a decent book on Bash Scripting / Python specifically aimed at creating system administration. The amount of books I have tried reading are like watching paint dry getting you to create stuff like hello world etc.or others are just so boring to read pages of syntax......

    I think there is a serious gap in the market for a product like this or a video course series that makes you start out with a basic script and over the course of the training you keep the same script but gradually incorporate more advanced features. Until you build a menu driven script and add more advanced stuff such as a GUI that would be awesome i'm even tempted to oo one myself and put it on udemy.
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Member Posts: 2,013 ■■■■■□□□□□

    Have you personally taken this course? Wondering if it's actually good or not. Their Django course has a single 1 star review. Even at $15, I don't know if the course is worth the time/money.
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  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    lol nope not all ;) I agree with not taking a course with zero reviews and for that much too. Who knows if you can even understand the instructor!

    Just saw a course that matched what he was looking for.
  • ChinookChinook Member Posts: 206
    I subscribe to Linux Academy which has training on Python. I signed up for the Amazon training as I felt the CBT Nuggets training was a bit thin. I've been nothing but impressed and their Linux training looks pretty solid (I'm proficient in Linux). Even the basic Linux Essentials training talked about the differences between FSF & OSI & all the other open licensing (MIT, BSD, etc).

    You might want to give them a try. You pay month to month so I assume you can cancel at anytime. It's $25 dollars well spent in my mind.
  • ally_ukally_uk Member Posts: 1,146 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Are there any free python 3 administration resources?
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Member Posts: 2,013 ■■■■■□□□□□
    3 out of 5 of the resources I posted above were free.
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  • YFZbluYFZblu Member Posts: 1,462 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Not to be a downer, but for Linux systems administration, you should be looking at Bash. With Python, you'll just end up using it to execute shell commands anyway...Python is my language of choice for general scripting; but Bash is the best tool for the job in your case.

    Edit: I stand by the above - but if you insist, this book (suggested by DoubleNNs) looks pretty comprehensive and overall has good reviews:

    http://www.amazon.com/Python-Unix-Linux-System-Administration/dp/0596515820

    Regarding Python 2 vs 3: I wouldn't worry about it much. Two is still the standard and what people generally code for. Three is the future of course, but to me it's sort of the IPv6 of scripting...until there is an explicit necessity, people will continue using v2.
  • kohr-ahkohr-ah Member Posts: 1,277
    DoubleNNs wrote: »
    Dive Into Python 3


    https://automatetheboringstuff.com/ Is a book I've bought and plan to get thru - tho I don't know how Windows or Linux centric the book is yet, as I haven't read it.

    Good book. The examples you can tell he is using windows programs but the way presented it isn't windows oriented.
  • ally_ukally_uk Member Posts: 1,146 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I didn't like dive into python found it's first example a bit to complicated.....

    I have a few CBT nuggets videos on Python 3 and other online courses which I have been working through. When I am done with them I will go through code academy.

    I also have a whole series of videos on Python 3 Linux administration and it gets you to build networking apps and stuff, way above my level at the moment but it's on the to do list for the future.

    Bash scripting I have a few videos aswell to work through :)
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
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