Azure for 70-410 labs

is Azure a good option for getting hands on with MCSA?

Comments

  • Mike7Mike7 Member Posts: 1,080 ■■■■□□□□□□
    70-410 is Installing and Configuring Windows Server.
    VM(Virtual Machines)s are a better option. VirtualBox is free and you can download eval copy of Windows Server.
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    i agree however i need to be able to lab while i am @ work and i cant install any servers on the production network, so i have to remote to a computer
  • Mike7Mike7 Member Posts: 1,080 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Remote back to your home PC?
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    yea thats what i was doing but i think my ISP is blocking that traffic
  • systemstechsystemstech Member Posts: 120
    Do you have a VPN connection? If not, you can open up port 3389 on your home router (not recommended though because of security). Once you do that, you can RDP into your home box. Again, I wouldn't recommend it.
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    Do you have a VPN connection? If not, you can open up port 3389 on your home router (not recommended though because of security). Once you do that, you can RDP into your home box. Again, I wouldn't recommend it.

    i do not have a vpn.. i have my router forwarding 3389 to my server but i still cant connect
  • DojiscalperDojiscalper Member Posts: 266 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I've had that same type of problem and found that some unmentioned firewall rules are complicating things. Use the command something like get-netfirewallrule -display name "remote" to take a look at them and set those remote ones to enable.
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    I've had that same type of problem and found that some unmentioned firewall rules are complicating things. Use the command something like get-netfirewallrule -display name "remote" to take a look at them and set those remote ones to enable.
    .

    i have done it before its never done that before
  • SconnieInShortsSconnieInShorts Member Posts: 30 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Can you get an old-ish tower from work and just stick it into a corner with a mouse, monitor, and keyboard? Keep it off network and do it that way? Or ask your network guys to carve you out a little subnet that isn't routed anywhere so you can do your training with it without disrupting anything else?

    Azure is only going to get you so far... You can't actually do any of your own OS install in Azure, but you could config a server with DC, DNS, DHCP, etc for roles in Azure. Not Hyper-V though.
    2016 Goals --
    Microsoft Certified Specialist - Virtualization with Hyper-V and System Center: 74-409 [X]; MCSA Server 2012: 70-410 [], 70-411 []; MCSE Private Cloud: 70-246 [], 70-247[]; MCSA Server 2016: TBD []; VCP6-DCV []
  • nascar_paulnascar_paul Member Posts: 287 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Have you tried TeamViewer? There's a free version that I've used for years that will accomplish what you're looking to do nicely w/o the additional setup or expense of remote connection appliances.
    :D
    2017 Goals: 70-411 [X], 74-409 [X], 70-533 [X], VCP5-DCV [], LX0-103 [], LX0-104 []
    "I PLAN to fail!" - No One Ever
  • techfiendtechfiend Member Posts: 1,481 ■■■■□□□□□□
    You could try adding or changing RDP port on your home lab. It's much safer and might get around the blockage.
    2018 AWS Solutions Architect - Associate (Apr) 2017 VCAP6-DCV Deploy (Oct) 2016 Storage+ (Jan)
    2015 Start WGU (Feb) Net+ (Feb) Sec+ (Mar) Project+ (Apr) Other WGU (Jun) CCENT (Jul) CCNA (Aug) CCNA Security (Aug) MCP 2012 (Sep) MCSA 2012 (Oct) Linux+ (Nov) Capstone/BS (Nov) VCP6-DCV (Dec) ITILF (Dec)
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    Have you tried TeamViewer? There's a free version that I've used for years that will accomplish what you're looking to do nicely w/o the additional setup or expense of remote connection appliances.
    :D

    i have tried TeamViewer, once i reboot after installing a role or something i cant get back on. i think its because they see its server OS.
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    techfiend wrote: »
    You could try adding or changing RDP port on your home lab. It's much safer and might get around the blockage.

    I always change the default RDP port and even then i still get get on.. from within i can remote to it tho
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    Azure will be fine for about 80% of what you need to do.

    To actually install the OS, you'll need bare metal or a VM. That bit is pretty straight forward. You could do all that stuff when you have the time at home.

    You'll ideally need bare metal box to install and configure Hyper-V which is a bigger part of the certification. It can be done in a VM with some trickery (I think VMWare workstation has a HyperV mode), but it is nicer to do on bare metal.

    The other stuff, DNS, DC's, DHCP, File and Print service, networking, powershell is all doable mostly on Azure. It also has the advantage of exposing you to Azure.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • Mike7Mike7 Member Posts: 1,080 ■■■■□□□□□□
    ed_003 wrote: »
    I always change the default RDP port and even then i still get get on.. from within i can remote to it tho
    Check the firewall settings. By default, RDP is enabled for "private" but not "public" networks. Enable for "public".
  • Mike7Mike7 Member Posts: 1,080 ■■■■□□□□□□
    OctalDump wrote: »
    You'll ideally need bare metal box to install and configure Hyper-V which is a bigger part of the certification. It can be done in a VM with some trickery (I think VMWare workstation has a HyperV mode), but it is nicer to do on bare metal.


    I recommend VHD Native Boot (aka Boot to VHD); i.e. your primary OS is still Windows 7/8/10, and you dual boot your PC to a VHD file running Windows Server. Advantages include the ability to run Hyper-V, near-native performance, and the fact you can trash this VHD file contents without affecting your primary OS files.

    For instructions, can try http://www.neowin.net/news/guide-how-to-install-windows-10-using-vhds

    Disclaimer: As usual, do backup your files before trying.
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    Mike7 wrote: »
    Check the firewall settings. By default, RDP is enabled for "private" but not "public" networks. Enable for "public".

    i have all that allowed.. i even created custom rules opening the ports
  • Mike7Mike7 Member Posts: 1,080 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Either your home router is not configured properly, ISP blocking or your work place block outgoing RDP traffic.

    For the first case, it could be a case of port not opened, wrong Internet IP or forwarding configured wrongly.

    You need to figure out the root cause.
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    If they are blocking RDP, it's probably just port 3389 that they are blocking. You can use another high number port, say 63389, and that would like be fine. If you router supports port remapping, that'd be the easiest way. Otherwise you can change the port of RDP on your server.

    But just use Azure or some online lab if that is the problem you are trying to solve. Learning Azure is only going to help you in the long run.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • ed_003ed_003 Member Posts: 216
    OctalDump wrote: »
    If they are blocking RDP, it's probably just port 3389 that they are blocking. You can use another high number port, say 63389, and that would like be fine. If you router supports port remapping, that'd be the easiest way. Otherwise you can change the port of RDP on your server.

    But just use Azure or some online lab if that is the problem you are trying to solve. Learning Azure is only going to help you in the long run.

    I know i have the correct WAN ip and i have also changed the port from the default 3389.. Azure seems really cool but it makes me paranoid because even tho its free they charge me for drives that attach and i need to create vm with win 7 and 8 and it wont allow me unless i get another subscription icon_redface.gif
Sign In or Register to comment.