If I Pass Only CCIE Written

dppagcdppagc Posts: 293Member
will i get any form of certification?
«1

Comments

  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,123Mod Mod
    No. It's not a certification. It just says you've finished the written requirement to take the lab - the only certification you get is if you pass the lab exam. I would say you shouldn't even put a CCIE Written on your resume since it tends to be a thing most hiring IT managers I've met roll their eyes at.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    To add to what Iris said, the only things passing the written does is renew all your same- or lower- level certifications (*NA, *NP, any other *IEs), and unlock a CCIE section on the Cisco website so you can review/schedule lab dates and the like.
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • hurricane1091hurricane1091 Posts: 918Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Not saying I wouldn't put a CCIE written on my resume (especially if I was in the process of getting ready to take the lab), but my boss did tell me he hates when he sees that.
  • BardlebeeBardlebee Posts: 264Member
    Not saying I wouldn't put a CCIE written on my resume (especially if I was in the process of getting ready to take the lab), but my boss did tell me he hates when he sees that.

    I take my Written this Wed. I've heard this too and personally I am not going to do it. I will definitely put on there studying for my CCIE, but I probably won't list it as a cert or something of that level. When in the interview I will tell them I finished the written etc... I've heard mixed things about it honestly. So I figure just don't put it on there to be safe.
  • joelsfoodjoelsfood Posts: 1,027Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    Definitely do not put CCIE written on your resume. I can't count the amount of hiring managers I've heard ranting about that. Once you do pass it and have your lab scheduled, it is appropriate to mention that in an interview or cover letter though. IE, "In addition, I have my CCIE lab exam scheduled for next month"
  • BardlebeeBardlebee Posts: 264Member
    joelsfood wrote: »
    Definitely do not put CCIE written on your resume. I can't count the amount of hiring managers I've heard ranting about that. Once you do pass it and have your lab scheduled, it is appropriate to mention that in an interview or cover letter though. IE, "In addition, I have my CCIE lab exam scheduled for next month"

    Yeah, what this guy said. Problem is, from what I've read and what I can tell, the CCIE specifically has had a big problem with dumpers so putting CCIE Written on there is a heavy eye roll. Which is a shame because its quite a bit of work to pass as I've noticed :P
  • jamesp1983jamesp1983 Posts: 2,475Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Not saying I wouldn't put a CCIE written on my resume (especially if I was in the process of getting ready to take the lab), but my boss did tell me he hates when he sees that.

    No, the Written isn't a certification by itself. There isn't an "all-but-lab" cert.

    The Written isn't an easy test to pass legitimately, but my boss and I do find it easy to spot the dumpers. An in-depth tech screen will typically reveal them. We put candidates through a tech prescreen conf call, white board design session in the office if they pass the prescreen, as well as a troubleshooting lab that's 8 questions long (CCNP level).
    "Check both the destination and return path when a route fails." "Switches create a network. Routers connect networks."
  • BardlebeeBardlebee Posts: 264Member
    jamesp1983 wrote: »
    No, the Written isn't a certification by itself. There isn't an "all-but-lab" cert.

    The Written isn't an easy test to pass legitimately, but my boss and I do find it easy to spot the dumpers. An in-depth tech screen will typically reveal them. We put candidates through a tech prescreen conf call, white board design session in the office if they pass the prescreen, as well as a troubleshooting lab that's 8 questions long (CCNP level).

    Yeah I agree with this. I'm surprised how much my game has been stepped up since taking on this journey, 108 days in I feel like a CCNP+ :)

    It would be really easy to find the dumpers, but I think that is the problem with why Cisco is changing everything lately, is due to that bad interview spotting... not to totally derail this thread anyway ;) That is a whole other topic.
  • shednikshednik Posts: 2,005Member
    jamesp1983 wrote: »
    No, the Written isn't a certification by itself. There isn't an "all-but-lab" cert.

    The Written isn't an easy test to pass legitimately, but my boss and I do find it easy to spot the dumpers. An in-depth tech screen will typically reveal them. We put candidates through a tech prescreen conf call, white board design session in the office if they pass the prescreen, as well as a troubleshooting lab that's 8 questions long (CCNP level).

    This is why I've grown to appreciate the certification structure Juniper uses, every exam you pass gives you some recognition for what you've accomplished.
  • BardlebeeBardlebee Posts: 264Member
    shednik wrote: »
    This is why I've grown to appreciate the certification structure Juniper uses, every exam you pass gives you some recognition for what you've accomplished.

    Since I work on Juniper a lot nowadays, I was thinking about doing that. But I would then have to recert in two separate lines. I may pursue after my CCIE. I've heard the same thing from other posts as well and from articles stating the CCIE Written is way off base and should just be done away with or create a CCNP+ cert of sorts, then have the lab.
  • theodoxatheodoxa Posts: 1,340Member
    joelsfood wrote: »
    Definitely do not put CCIE written on your resume. I can't count the amount of hiring managers I've heard ranting about that. Once you do pass it and have your lab scheduled, it is appropriate to mention that in an interview or cover letter though. IE, "In addition, I have my CCIE lab exam scheduled for next month"

    I've never really understood that attitude (among hiring managers). In my mind, having passed the CCIE Written shows that you are progressing towards your CCIE. I wouldn't pay for an exam that doesn't even give you a cert unless I expected to be lab ready well before it (the written) expired. I look at the CCIE Written as a CCNP+ and if I were hiring would prefer someone who has their CCNP and passed the CCIE Written over someone with just a CCNP as it shows they are trying to get better and not just coasting.

    If it is about cheating (brain dumping), I could see not giving it much weight (beyond that already afforded by having a CCNP and experience), but to view it as a negative makes no sense. The only exception I can think of is if someone had passed the CCIE: Written, but never had a CCNP. I would look at that with suspicion. But, a CCNP who has passed the CCIE Written > a CCNP all other things being equal.
    R&S: CCENT CCNA CCNP CCIE [ ]
    Security: CCNA [ ]
    Virtualization: VCA-DCV [ ]
  • bermovickbermovick Posts: 1,134Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    To be honest, I sortof cheated in that area (or I did before my 18 month window expired).

    I would NOT put down that I had CCIE Written in my list of certifications (since obviously it's not something that stands on its own), but in my "Currently studying" I specifically listed the CCIE Lab. It usually started a conversation about whether or not I had passed the written and how close I was and anyone else the interviewer knew who had taken the lab (etc etc), without giving the impression that I'm trying to claim I have a level of knowledge I don't (yet) have.
    Latest Completed: CISSP

    Current goal: Dunno
  • joelsfoodjoelsfood Posts: 1,027Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    the problem is that so many people do **** the CCIE written and have no intention of ever taking the lab. If you have a good memory, a **** and $400 gets you to point where you can say you've passed the CCIE written, without ever having to invest in bootcamps, rack rentals, lab exam, travel, etc. And I see it happen all of the time. That's what taints it. As mentioned, if you can say I've passed written, I have lab scheduled for next week and tickets purchased, that's something else (I should be finishing up right around this time next week, so I am also biased ;) ). But just having passed CCIE written and putting it on your resume always raises my hackles. I'm not a hiring manager, but I am senior staff who sits in on and submits two cents on hires, etc.
  • ScalesScales Posts: 95Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Not sure if this has been mentioned - if you pass the written and you hold any Associate or Professional Level certifications it will renew all of them.
  • billscott92787billscott92787 Posts: 933Member
    Coming from someone who has done a TON of interviews for the second largest telecommunications company in the world I would put it on your resume. In all honesty, I haven't come across a single person that has rolled their eyes at it. In addition, it is going to get you more visibility since head hunters are going to target on those key words. That being said, if you put it on your resume you better be able to back it up. I don't have the CCIE lab done, it is something I want to do but when I see it on a resume, I immediately start gearing up the technical grill questions.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,123Mod Mod
    Coming from someone who has done a TON of interviews for the second largest telecommunications company in the world I would put it on your resume. In all honesty, I haven't come across a single person that has rolled their eyes at it. In addition, it is going to get you more visibility since head hunters are going to target on those key words. That being said, if you put it on your resume you better be able to back it up. I don't have the CCIE lab done, it is something I want to do but when I see it on a resume, I immediately start gearing up the technical grill questions.

    Eh... I would say not to put it on the resume. Every customer and even internal to my company, it's a negative to put the CCIE written on your resume. It is NOT a certification and while it might not disqualify you completely always, I've known plenty of managers that automatically send that resume to dumpsterland if they see it there. Either that or you get the hardest technical interview you've ever experienced you need to be able to back up "close to" CCIE knowledge.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • billscott92787billscott92787 Posts: 933Member
    I will still tend to disagree as it shows your progressing toward the lab. I have seen TONS UPON TONS of resume's with this and has not ever affected one from getting a single interview. Seen it at multiple different companies as well. The key is being able to back up whatever question they may ask. Yeah you may not be "close to" CCIE knowledge but in all honesty, how can you say that? You have no idea what knowledge the person has listing that on their resume. They could be prepared to take the lab, just passed the written, and are sitting in a month for the official lab. In that case one should just totally omit it from their resume? That sounds pretty dumb in my opinion. I would want to show potential employers that movement. I guess things may work differently out in democratic/communist CA land though LOL.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,123Mod Mod
    Democratic/communist CA land? Really? That's a stupid comment to somebody not agreeing with you.

    The reason it's viewed as a negative is that so many people **** the written but never end up passing the lab and it's still a NON-certification. So many people end up listing it or listing multiple CCIE writtens without ever passing a lab. They're just hoping to get past HR word searches and by the time they get to a technical manager, the manager realizes they don't have a CCIE or nowhere near the knowledge of what they need to pass. There's plenty of people in this thread from all over the country stating the same thing. It may be different for your particular company or the group of people that you professionally associate with but it's not anywhere near the norm from what I've seen in the medium to larger sized customers I deal with or even internally to my own company.

    The only way I would take a CCIE written seriously is if there is a lab date booked but too many people take the written and do nothing with it. I've seen people's resume's with "CCIE Written 2010" listed under certifications and it's 2014-2016. It's obvious that they're not taking the lab, the written is expired, etc but it's still sitting there on the resume and it's listed under certifications 99.9% of the time.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • billscott92787billscott92787 Posts: 933Member
    Actually it is not a comment. It's a true statement based on political representation. :) I wasn't trying to argue.

    That being said, yes there are many people who can **** the written and never pass the lab. They can do the same on CCNP do you recommend people don't put a CCNP certification on their resume? I see there are many people on here saying the same there are some saying different. I would say it's highly doubtful that it is just different for my company (AT&T) and I've seen it as well at multiple different employers. Also, with the statement that is being given, are you assuming someone is interviewing for a CCIE job with a written? Because if not, then how would the technical manager expect them to have CCIE knowledge?

    In my past experiences most hiring managers have common sense of knowing that if someone has passed the CCIE Written that it doesn't constitute the knowledge of passing the lab. That being said, at the end of the day, I guess it's based on personal preference. I would welcome putting it on my resume to answer any technical questions that they threw my way but I love a challenge!
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,123Mod Mod
    I'm pretty sure my state's political representation is not listed as "communist party" nor do you know anything about my personal political beliefs.

    CCNP can be dumped. You're right. But it's also a real certification. Not a pre-qualifier to take a certification lab. To list CCIE written as a certification screams unethical to me as well as others. It's also a half-accomplishment. Maybe they're not going for a CCIE job but why are they listing a non-certification on their resume to get past HR filters in the first place? In most cases, they're going for a network engineer job - not a NOC level job. And as myself and others have said - if you're going to list the CCIE Written, you better be prepared for a TOUGH technical interview because ideally, you're close enough to the lab or at least lab-level book knowledge to have passed that written. If you don't have that knowledge, you're wasting the interviewers time.

    The exception to the above that I see is fine is if the employer is asking for a "CCIE Written," then sure. List it. Or you have a lab date booked - list both but not under certifications.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • billscott92787billscott92787 Posts: 933Member
    They are listing it because it's a pre-qualification for the lab which shows that it has been passed and that person is "potentially" progressing toward the lab. I honestly don't see the big harm. I guess it's all personal preference. Also, I did not once claim to know your political beliefs, but the overall state of residence may as well have a dictator. LOL

    That being said, I had an old manager that would be hysterical over seeing CCIE Written on people's resume and immediately want to interview every single person with it listed. I had to explain the similar points you are here. I've seen both sides and I don't see the harm if you have knowledge, can back that up to a CCNP level, and you're not applying for a CCIE job.
  • joelsfoodjoelsfood Posts: 1,027Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    CCIE Written is not a certification. Period. It's like calling yourself a doctor because you passed your MCATs. It's only use is as a qualification to allow you to sit the lab exam.
  • billscott92787billscott92787 Posts: 933Member
    Again, never said it was a certification.
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,123Mod Mod
    Also, I did not once claim to know your political beliefs, but the overall state of residence may as well have a dictator. LOL

    This is a professional forum. I don't come here to debate or deal with politics or mock someone's state because I don't agree with what I interpret as its ideological beliefs. It's unprofessional to say the least and this is Techexams - not Redstate or MSNBC.

    You have professional points I agree with and others I don't which I may respectfully disagree with but it's relative to your experience. Also put the thread in context of the OP. Look at some of the threads he's started and remember that he recently passed the CCNP. If he were to pass the CCIE Written in the next month and start listing that on his resume, I don't think that would fare well for this particular individual.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • billscott92787billscott92787 Posts: 933Member
    This is a professional forum. I don't come here to debate or deal with politics or mock someone's state because I don't agree with what I interpret as its ideological beliefs. It's unprofessional to say the least and this is Techexams - not Redstate or MSNBC.

    You have professional points I agree with and others I don't which I may respectfully disagree with but it's relative to your experience. Also put the thread in context of the OP. Look at some of the threads he's started and remember that he recently passed the CCNP. If he were to pass the CCIE Written in the next month and start listing that on his resume, I don't think that would fare well for this particular individual.


    Agreed. Depends on the individuals professional experience.
  • pevangelpevangel Posts: 342Member
    shednik wrote: »
    This is why I've grown to appreciate the certification structure Juniper uses, every exam you pass gives you some recognition for what you've accomplished.
    Not true. You do not get a cert or any recognition for passing the Junos Troubleshooting exam which is a prerequisite for the JNCSP exams.

    I don't get why hiring managers would rant over a candidate listing an exam in their resume. What exactly bothers them about it?
  • IristheangelIristheangel CCIEx2 (Sec + DC), CCNP RS, CCNA V/S/R/DC, CISSP, CEH, MCSE 2003, A+/L+/N+/S+, and a lot more from m Pasadena, CAPosts: 4,123Mod Mod
    pevangel wrote: »
    I don't get why hiring managers would rant over a candidate listing an exam in their resume. What exactly bothers them about it?

    What I've seen is that a lot of managers see it as disingenuous when it's listed under their certifications since it's not a certification. A lot of folks have taken it without any intention of taking the lab, just want to renew their CCNP, and they hope they clear HR screenings with just having "CCIE" on their resume. I think the general attitude I've seen among hiring managers is that it's not a certification and most of the people they interview with a "CCIE written" are so far from being anywhere near CCIE that they're burnt out by it.

    Other fun things I or others have seen on resumes:
    - CCIE Written x8
    - CCIE R&S (W) <- Not elaborating it's a written. Just (w) all over their resume and Linkedin. Hoping that no one notices or asks for a number.
    - CCIE Written 2009 (or other date from years ago and it's obviously past the time they can use it for the lab)
    etc etc etc

    It's not a bad idea to show you're working towards a CCIE - like Bill said - but it shouldn't be listed as a certification and I think it's better to put down that you have a lab date scheduled because then myself or other people looking at your resume know you're actually serious about taking your CCIE. A lot of these jokers putting it down list it under certifications hoping some HR person doesn't notice it's a written and they get expedited to an interview. I guess it must work some of the time and there are plenty of companies out there that still don't do proper technical interviews but if you get a manager or peer engineer that sees that and understands what it means, you're either a) opening yourself up to be grilled even harder than before on your technical interview or b) potentially ending up not getting an interview.
    BS, MS, and CCIE #50931
    Blog: www.network-node.com
  • Legacy UserLegacy User Posts: 0Unregistered / Not Logged In ■□□□□□□□□□
    This thread went a little left field.. but anyway the way I see it as anyone is free to do whatever they want on their resume whether or not it will lead to employment is another question. Plenty of people in this forum review resumes and conduct interviews so they know first hand how it negatively it looks.

    Problem with listing CCIE written on your resume you will trigger calls meant for opportunities for CCIE holders. You will ultimately end up wasting everyones time since its false advertising and once it is realized you are not a CCIE holder then phone call will be over. While no one can really say what an IT manager may think is great to find on a resume or they hate and toss out but its up to you to take that chance and possibly quickly get your resume tossed out for having that.

    IMO I feel if you have not passed the lab then you should not be mentioning it in your resume. You can mention it in your cover letter and interview. No one likes there time wasted and if someone who screens you doesn't know the difference will ultimately wasting everyones time.

    If you really know your stuff and have the experience to back it up advertise your CCNP proudly in bold letters on your resume and kill those interviews with your CCIE written knowledge. Having CCNP on your resume is enough to get the calls coming in.

    my .02 cents
  • DPGDPG Posts: 780Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    pevangel wrote: »
    I don't get why hiring managers would rant over a candidate listing an exam in their resume. What exactly bothers them about it?

    It isn't the hiring managers that are getting butt-hurt over this.

    If you have passed a written exam, it should be notated somewhere on your resume without blatantly saying "I am CCIE certified (but not really)."

  • lrblrb Posts: 526Member
    The CCIE written is not a certification itself, that is a fact. If you are putting it on a resume saying "CCIE Written" then I personally don't think that is right. When I was studying for the lab I had "Currently preparing for my CCIE R&S lab exam" on my CV listed as "professional goals" which I think is more accurate.
Sign In or Register to comment.