Seeking Any Advice

Hello, I am writing to ask for advice to help me be a bit more decisive. From experience, which area in IT is most attractive and maybe even perhaps fun? How do I narrow down which areas in IT that I want to focus on? What certificates should I try to obtain next, can I go straight to Security+? Any and all advice are welcomed, thanks in advance.

Comments

  • BigMevyBigMevy Posts: 68Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    techtia wrote: »
    I am writing to ask for advice to help me be a bit more decisive. From experience, which area in IT is most attractive and maybe even perhaps fun? How do I narrow down which areas in IT that I want to focus on? What certificates should I try to obtain next, can I go straight to Security+?

    Any and all advice are welcomed, thanks in advance.

    Asking which areas of IT are most attractive and fun is going to result in answers as varied as the responders. The best thing you can do is get some experience and that will give you better insight into what you find is interesting and what isn't. That will at least get you pointed in a direction. The certificates you mentioned are good entry ones to work on, and it will broaden your knowledge of the various areas of IT, and perhaps help you choose a path.

    If you're not working currently, try volunteering for some IT work with non-profits or the like. It will get you started in the field and help you start developing some idea of your likes/dislikes.

    Good luck.
  • $bvb379$bvb379 Posts: 155Member
    I am somewhat in the same position as you. A piece of advice, apply for any and all jobs you come across. Don't worry about what the sheet says when it list required experience or qualifications. You will most likely have to start in some kind of tech support or entry level job. Apply and take an entry level job like tech support at a larger company like Verizon, AT&T, or something at that scale. They just need to know you aren't an idiot and you should be able to move up quickly. For people with degrees and certs, these positions are simply "test" positions. Companies like hiring from within so taking one on the chin for a low paying, low level position is fine if you can swing it. Not sure what your financial situation is like.

    Going back to applying for jobs. Just be honest on your resume and be honest to the recruiter/HR person/hiring manager. I had a company call me yesterday and the guy pretty much told me up front that there are more qualified people for the position (nothing I haven't heard before). I told him my situation and he was impressed that I was so ambitious to get in the industry, so he set me up for an internship interview this Friday. I also graduated in 2013 so for someone to give me a chance to intern after I graduated really surprised me. The pay is low but he said I will be doing exactly what the people Tier 1 people do and they start at around $65K.

    Networking is also very important. Ask your parents (assuming you are in your 20's) if they know anyone who works at IT companies. They most likely do.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy SABSA, GCFA, GPEN, CISM, RHCE, Security+, Server+, eJPT, CCNA Posts: 4,050Mod Mod
    Get any job in your field of study (business). Fun starts AFTER you gain valuable HARD skills, think 3~5 yrs down the road when you have experience and knowledge and are able to solve interesting problems. Work to pay the bills and have fun outside work.
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • TheFORCETheFORCE Senior Member Posts: 2,297Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    BigMevy wrote: »
    Asking which areas of IT are most attractive and fun is going to result in answers as varied as the responders. The best thing you can do is get some experience and that will give you better insight into what you find is interesting and what isn't. That will at least get you pointed in a direction. The certificates you mentioned are good entry ones to work on, and it will broaden your knowledge of the various areas of IT, and perhaps help you choose a path.

    If you're not working currently, try volunteering for some IT work with non-profits or the like. It will get you started in the field and help you start developing some idea of your likes/dislikes.

    Good luck.

    Couldn't have said it better. This is a good advice. By us telling you this field or that field doesn't mean you will like it. Only you will know what you like by experiencing some of the areas on your own in an entry position to start with.
  • dcarey4698dcarey4698 Posts: 56Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    The more attractive field is going to vary depending on the person. You just have to do some research on the different fields and make a decision based off of what you think is interesting.
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