Done with CCNP what now ?

niba10niba10 Member Posts: 54 ■■■□□□□□□□
where I should continue go for the CCIE or other track is recommended?

Comments

  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    Finished CCNP R+S? I'm currently studying for this, and have given some thought to what next. At the moment, I'd lean towards expanding with another CCNP before attempting CCIE. From what I've seen of CCIE R+S there is some overlap with at least Security, Data Center and Service Provider. For instance, MPLS. So, if you need to get up to speed on those areas anyway, why not get another CCNP?

    I also see quite a few dual CCNPs, and lots of CCIEs with dual (or more) CCNP. Longer term it also puts you in a position to get dual CCIE.

    The other thing is to think about the market, and where you might want to work. I know someone who went into Wireless because they noticed a huge shortage for people in Wireless, so it is easier to get a good paying job.

    But all of this depends very much on your personal circumstances, background, where you are working now, your aspirations etc.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • niba10niba10 Member Posts: 54 ■■■□□□□□□□
    OctalDump wrote: »
    Finished CCNP R+S? I'm currently studying for this, and have given some thought to what next. At the moment, I'd lean towards expanding with another CCNP before attempting CCIE. From what I've seen of CCIE R+S there is some overlap with at least Security, Data Center and Service Provider. For instance, MPLS. So, if you need to get up to speed on those areas anyway, why not get another CCNP?

    I also see quite a few dual CCNPs, and lots of CCIEs with dual (or more) CCNP. Longer term it also puts you in a position to get dual CCIE.

    The other thing is to think about the market, and where you might want to work. I know someone who went into Wireless because they noticed a huge shortage for people in Wireless, so it is easier to get a good paying job.

    But all of this depends very much on your personal circumstances, background, where you are working now, your aspirations etc.

    I have been at cisco center in my country and the instructor told us that SDN gonna fight R&S so I asked him if thier is a track in cisco
    which I can learn SDN he told me they will put it in DATA CENTER ? is it true ?

    And where I can get what is specifically each track certification do?
  • NOC-NinjaNOC-Ninja Member Posts: 1,403
    It depends on what you want or your goal. CCIE is very different on CCNP studying.
  • niba10niba10 Member Posts: 54 ■■■□□□□□□□
    NOC-Ninja wrote: »
    It depends on what you want or your goal. CCIE is very different on CCNP studying.

    Im currently have a regualar job not an IT so im looking for certification that I can get most benefit for me and get an good salary IT job.
    anyway where I can see what is the difference between each track ?
  • NOC-NinjaNOC-Ninja Member Posts: 1,403
    niba10 wrote: »
    Im currently have a regualar job not an IT so im looking for certification that I can get most benefit for me and get an good salary IT job.
    anyway where I can see what is the difference between each track ?


    Id suggest you find an IT job that directly use CCNA.
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    100% I have to say that the best way for you to increase your IT salary potential is to get IT work experience. CCIE or even CCNP without experience is not going to get you far, or at least not much further than a CCNA will.

    I think ideal would be for you to get a NOC job (or similar networking admin role) and work for 12 months, then have another look around. The good news is if you have CCNP, you should be able to get those entry level jobs that want CCNA a bit easier. If you get a job somewhere with good management, they should be able to accelerate you along a bit based on your CCNP.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • thewiz8807thewiz8807 Member Posts: 96 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Even at a NOC most of your CCNA knowledge may not be put to use. Some NOC positions use very minimal material like show commands, ping, traceroute, etc. Still, a NOC would be your best bet to reinforce what you've learned through using it daily. At least some of it anyways..
    Goals: Network+ (Done) -> CCNA: R&S (Done) -> CCNA: Security (Done) -> Security+ (Done) -> ITIL v3 Foundation (Done) -> CASP (Done) -> CCNP: R/S (In Progress) -> CCNP: Collaboration -> CCSK -> CCSP -> CISSP
  • niba10niba10 Member Posts: 54 ■■■□□□□□□□
    NOC-Ninja wrote: »
    Id suggest you find an IT job that directly use CCNA.

    yes but what if I cant work at IT now for one year from now and I got CCNP what other certifications I can get now that maximize my potential to get an good IT salary job one year from now ?
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    You won't make any more just because you have a CCNP vs a CCNA because you'll still have zero experience?
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    thewiz8807 wrote: »
    Even at a NOC most of your CCNA knowledge may not be put to use. Some NOC positions use very minimal material like show commands, ping, traceroute, etc. Still, a NOC would be your best bet to reinforce what you've learned through using it daily. At least some of it anyways..

    +1 - I work in a NOC and I'm a CCIE, there is really a large amount of my knowledge I don't use. I really shouldn't be in a NOC anymore.
  • OctalDumpOctalDump Member Posts: 1,722
    niba10 wrote: »
    yes but what if I cant work at IT now for one year from now and I got CCNP what other certifications I can get now that maximize my potential to get an good IT salary job one year from now ?

    Soft skills are probably the best thing. ITIL, Project Management. Security+ might be useful. If you have CCNP, you should be able to get ITIL Foundation and Security+ without to much struggle. The Project Management thing is useful initially to show that you have enough understanding to work well on a project team, but longer term it is good to show that you can lead projects. If you land a CCNP role, then projects will likely be part of your life.

    But a lot will also depend on what you do over that 12 months.
    2017 Goals - Something Cisco, Something Linux, Agile PM
  • TillyTilly Registered Users Posts: 4 ■□□□□□□□□□
    OctalDump,
    I also noticed the job market looking for certified technicians in wireless. I have thought long and hard about going that direction but I wanted to get my CCNP going first.
  • tbgree00tbgree00 Member Posts: 553 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Quick question, do you have a home lab with the Cisco equipment? Have been paying for a remote lab? I had a little trouble with my CCENT with 6 years of general IT experience and a couple switches at home.

    I'm not sure your definition of good IT salary job but it'll be a tough sell to get you into a CCNP level role without the related experience. Maybe a recruiter can help get you in the door with the cert but without experience to back it up a hiring manager may make assumptions about the certs you put on your resume.
    I finally started that blog - www.thomgreene.com
  • chrisonechrisone Senior Member Member Posts: 2,131 ■■■■■■■■■□
    CCIE is a great goal.

    However looking at this based on your experience and career goals, are you well rounded in other technologies or you are just familiar with R/S CCNP level concepts?

    Most jobs need engineers with R/S, Security, Wireless, DataCenter, some VOIP. So if you are lacking in those areas, you may want to do some CCNA/CCNP certs in other technologies. You don't want to be that CCIE guy who does not know what to do with an ASA firewall or Nexus switch.

    Good luck!
    Certs: CISSP, OSCP, CRTP, eCPPT, eCIR, LFCS, CEH, AZ-900, VHL:Advanced+, Retired Cisco CCNP/SP/DP
    2020 Goals:
    Courses: VHL (completed), CQURE: Windows Security Crash Course (completed), BlackHills InfoSec: Breaching the Cloud (completed), eLearnSecurity: WAPTv3 (completed), IHRP (completed), THPv2 (completed), PTXv2 (in-progress)
    Certs: VHL: Advanced+ (completed), OSCP (completed), AZ-500 (failed 1st attempt), eLearnSecurity: eWPT (failed 2x, no further attempts), eLearnSecurity: eCIR (complete), eLearnSecurity: eCTHPv2 (report: awaiting results), eLearnSecurity: eCPTXv2 (Late-Nov)
  • atorvenatorven Member Posts: 319
    Assuming that you’re already familiar with R&S CCNP level concepts, but you’re working in a system/network admin role with minor R&S duties, what would put you in a better standing for an engineering role, pursuing CCIE level knowledge or getting familiar with other tracks such as Security?

    How far would one need to go with understanding ASAs? I’ve had a look through the CCNP: Security track and some of those exams/topics don’t seem that interesting, that coupled with the exam costs/lack of preparation materials it doesn’t seem like a good investment to pursue this track fully.

    The Service provider track definitely looks interesting purely because of the topics, but at a quick glance it seems like this is the same stuff that would be covered at the CCIE R&S level, aren’t you better of working at the CCIE?

    How about certs from other vendors, I’m thinking Juniper at the JNCIP level, is this worthwhile?

    Changing jobs do a low paid R&S job is off the cards.

    Thanks guys.
  • MowMow Member Posts: 445 ■■■□□□□□□□
    @atorven

    I would say get familiar with other tracks. If you want a good understanding of the ASA, there are tons of resources out there, books, videos, Cisco documents, etc. You can get yourself an ASA 5506-X on ebay for around $400 and play around with that, and Firepower, etc. Once you understand how it works, and can confidently make changes without blowing things up, move on to something else, like wireless or learn some NXOS. CCIE level knowledge is great, but if you're not going to use it day to day, I would think it would get extremely frustrating to maintain that knowledge. Better to diversify and learn about topics you can roll into your day to day job, IMO.
  • chrisonechrisone Senior Member Member Posts: 2,131 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Its not just about what you feel is interesting topics or justifiable costs for learning a technology, its also about what employers are expecting you to know and do for said job/career.

    If you want to be a network engineer or network admin (networking related) employers want well rounded experienced engineers. Its rare to see a networking job where you just do r/s. These days its also hard to find an "all cisco shop." Be prepared to run into juniper, checkpoint, palo alto, F5, A10, brocade, etc. Sooner or later you will have to work on those other brands certs as well.

    2 cents
    Certs: CISSP, OSCP, CRTP, eCPPT, eCIR, LFCS, CEH, AZ-900, VHL:Advanced+, Retired Cisco CCNP/SP/DP
    2020 Goals:
    Courses: VHL (completed), CQURE: Windows Security Crash Course (completed), BlackHills InfoSec: Breaching the Cloud (completed), eLearnSecurity: WAPTv3 (completed), IHRP (completed), THPv2 (completed), PTXv2 (in-progress)
    Certs: VHL: Advanced+ (completed), OSCP (completed), AZ-500 (failed 1st attempt), eLearnSecurity: eWPT (failed 2x, no further attempts), eLearnSecurity: eCIR (complete), eLearnSecurity: eCTHPv2 (report: awaiting results), eLearnSecurity: eCPTXv2 (Late-Nov)
  • Danielh22185Danielh22185 Member Posts: 1,195 ■■■■□□□□□□
    chrisone wrote: »
    Its not just about what you feel is interesting topics or justifiable costs for learning a technology, its also about what employers are expecting you to know and do for said job/career.

    If you want to be a network engineer or network admin (networking related) employers want well rounded experienced engineers. Its rare to see a networking job where you just do r/s. These days its also hard to find an "all cisco shop." Be prepared to run into juniper, checkpoint, palo alto, F5, A10, brocade, etc. Sooner or later you will have to work on those other brands certs as well.

    2 cents


    Well said indeed! My job as a NOC Engineer touches on a ton of Cisco but I am also responsible to support Arista, Juniper, F5 LTM, Citrix Netscaler, Riverbed, all in the same regard.


    @OP

    CCNP with no job experience? Not to say it's unheard of or undo-able however I would say its rare for someone who is passionate about networking/IT to have an NP but not have a job even at an entry level within IT.

    I'm not trying to be rude or bash you, please don't take it in that way but reading your comments sounds to me like you are trying to pad your resume and fill it with certifications to force a salary you think you desirve. That simply isn't how it works. Quite honestly I question how legitimately you obtained your CCNP. I find it extremely shocking for someone to take a certification to the professional level yet not even is employed in IT. Agreeably I don't know you or your situation so I will reserve judgment.

    Certifications are the foundation of one's knowledge level. They should be used as a tool to build foundation knowledge and open those doors of opportunity. However like with any job your experience is based on what you have done and can prove that you can do is what gets you the job. If you have legitimately earned your certification that's great, however don't expect big pay with zero IT experience and a professional level cert. Unfortunately we have tons of "Paper Cert" people come through my NOC looking for a job thinking the cert will automatically guarantee them a position and the money but can't speak a lick about the simplest of network concepts.

    Don't get me wrong I am not trying to say that certification are worthless either. On the contrary I firmly believe in them. I can for one say I have learned a TON through my cert studies over the years. However I wasn't just memorizing answers just to pass a test. I was building my knowledge and skills. I firmly believe my certs got me where I am today not because of the letters beside my name but because of the conscious effort I put into learning and growing. This is what a certification really is to me.

    So...

    My suggestion to you:

    1) Reserve what you think you should earn for now.
    2) Accept you have no experience yet, and focus on building that.
    3) Continue to build that experience and in tandem you can obtain additional certs all with the goal in mind to solidify your skills becoming of a well rounded engineer.
    Currently Studying: IE Stuff...kinda...for now...
    My ultimate career goal: To climb to the top of the computer network industry food chain.
    "Winning means you're willing to go longer, work harder, and give more than anyone else." - Vince Lombardi
  • rjon17469rjon17469 Member Posts: 52 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'll echo some of what has been said earlier in that, a CCIE without daily on-the-job troubleshooting is particularly difficult. Not impossible, but if you're just getting into IT I would recommend multiple CCNPs over a CCIE.
  • DarwinJonesDarwinJones Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    I agree! with CCNA you're like targeting two birds with one stone...

    Also try to refer to this thread http://www.techexams.net/forums/ccnp/70900-what-do-next-after-ccnp.html
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