How to quit a job you like

renacidorenacido Member Posts: 387 ■■■■□□□□□□
I've landed a new job, cleared the background screening, and now comes the hard part - resigning my current position. I was in the military for 20+ years and in my civilian career I've never had to do this before. I'm finding it very hard to do because I have no hard feelings toward my boss, job, or company - I'm just moving on to something better.

Any advice on how to do this the right way?

Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Basically just tell your boss what you just posted here. No one should have a problem with you moving on to bigger and better things.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Just treat it like a band-aid and rip it off quickly and get it over with. You'll feel better after you do it.

    I just give them a resignation letter that's short and sweet then follow up in person or through IM asking if they want to sit down and go over anything. If your manager is a decent person, he'll understand why you're leaving and if he's not a decent person, then to heck with him.
  • 636-555-3226636-555-3226 Member Posts: 976 ■■■■■□□□□□
    I told my boss then sent a follow-up email (cc'ing HR). Just be honest. Say it isn't them, it's you. It's time for you to move on. Just watch a rom-com or two if you need better wording.
  • dustervoicedustervoice Member Posts: 877 ■■■■□□□□□□
    If you aren't 100% sure you want to leave then don't include HR in an email. Send it to your manager and request a meeting as well then HR can get involved after that initial conversation. its not as bad as you think it is, most managers will accept you moving on as they have done that in the past as well. for me its a bit different i tell HR immediately even before the boss as when i decide to leave a company, absolutely nothing will make me stay. No counteroffers, no promotion, no more duties, holiday, paid course , company car, my own secretary ... nothing!! good luck to you let us know how it goes.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,757 Mod
    Write a nice email and don't burn any bridges.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • BradleyHUBradleyHU Member Posts: 918 ■■■■□□□□□□
    just tell your manager(in person, or on the phone if they're not on site) that you're putting in your 2 weeks notice, and that you've accepted opportunity somewhere else. No need to say that it wasn't them or what not. Follow up with an email stating that you're resigning and when you're last day is, and thank you for the opportunity @ the firm. Keep it simple.
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  • BerkshireHerdBerkshireHerd Member Posts: 185
    Good advice from everyone.

    Just keep in mind it's a 2-way street. 99.999% of the time the company would have absolutely no problem letting you go, so you should have no problem letting them go.

    Sometimes you have to look out for ole number #1.
    Identity & Access Manager // B.A - Marshall University 2005
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb Member Posts: 3,298 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Probably just stop showing up and avoid all forms of contact. You've heard of ghosting from a dating perspective right? I think ghosting from a employee perspective is going to be the next "thing". Always good to avoid conflict whenever possible. :D

    Gratz on the new position btw!
  • tpatt100tpatt100 Member Posts: 2,991 ■■■■■■■■■□
    When I tried to put my notice in at my City job my manager wasn't in. So I left the letter on his desk and sent an email. Nosy a$$ person in another department saw it, read it and told HR I was quitting before I even got a chance to talk to my manager....
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Security +, ITIL Foundation, MPT, EPO, ACAS, HTL behind youMod Posts: 2,757 Mod
    tpatt100 wrote: »
    When I tried to put my notice in at my City job my manager wasn't in. So I left the letter on his desk and sent an email. Nosy a$$ person in another department saw it, read it and told HR I was quitting before I even got a chance to talk to my manager....
    That WAS not cool of that nosy idiot.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • renacidorenacido Member Posts: 387 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Thanks for the advice everyone. I wrote a simple and honest resignation letter and gave it to my boss in person in his office. He wasn't surprised, was sorry to see me go but was very understanding and supportive. I feel like a huge weight was lifted off of my chest and now I can be excited about my new job.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Mod Posts: 4,201 Mod
    Managers who take employees resignation personal irritate me. If they have budget problems they lay you off (no hard feelings there) but if you want to improve your life then how could you??

    Just be professional, thank them for the opportunity they given you and tell them that you want new challenges in your career and that you highly appreciate the time you spent with them.

    Just keep in mind that this is no shield against cry baby boss with emotional issues.
    Goal: MBA, Jan 2021
  • fmitawapsfmitawaps Banned Posts: 261
    Look at it from the other side. If the company were having money troubles and decided to lay you off, would they be nice about it, or would you be sitting on the sidewalk with your stuff in a cardboard box before you knew what happened?

    Be nice about it and give them two weeks notice. But only after you are dead certain the other job is for real, because there's probably no going back from this.
  • NOC-NinjaNOC-Ninja Member Posts: 1,403
    tell the truth. talk to your boss and tell him how you really feel.
  • gorebrushgorebrush Member Posts: 2,741
    renacido wrote: »
    Thanks for the advice everyone. I wrote a simple and honest resignation letter and gave it to my boss in person in his office. He wasn't surprised, was sorry to see me go but was very understanding and supportive. I feel like a huge weight was lifted off of my chest and now I can be excited about my new job.

    That's the way I would do it.

    EDIT: Congratulations on your new role, I wish you good luck!
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,297 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I had a similar struggle when I left a really local job, I could walk there from my house, I bumped into employees in town. I felt really awkward, but the next role was a big upgrade in specialization/pay/responsibility. The owner of the company totally understood, I was honest with him. I mostly felt bad because I was the only one that handled a ton of different things there and they didn't have, or want to spend, more money in extra staff or cross training. I helped find a new employee, helped train them, years later they still invite me to the holiday party, it doesn't have to be a bad thing when you leave.
  • pinkydapimppinkydapimp Member Posts: 732 ■■■■■□□□□□
    This was really hard for me to do the first time. Actually im lying. its been hard every time. Yet every move i have done has been extremely helpful to my career. So at the end of the day, you have to do whats best for you, your family and your career. Most people will respect that. You will have a few bosses that will try to guilt you about it, but they are simply looking out for themselves. Just be honest and move on.

    Congrats.
  • Danielm7Danielm7 Member Posts: 2,297 ■■■■■■■■□□
    The worst case I've ever seen was at a startup I worked at over a decade ago. One of the programmers was 20ish, being paid peanuts and all he wanted to do was go to college but said he couldn't afford it. His mom got a job at a local university and he was offered free schooling for the next few years. He left so he could dedicate himself to it. The owner and the manager dug into him, he's making the biggest mistake of his life, he'll never get an opportunity like that again...

    Years later the startup was sold, the employees were canned, the one who left finished a double major, got a job at a big pharma corp at a multiple of his original salary and has had a great life since. Yep, biggest mistake of his life indeed.
  • bpennbpenn Member Posts: 499
    This was really hard for me to do the first time. Actually im lying. its been hard every time. Yet every move i have done has been extremely helpful to my career. So at the end of the day, you have to do whats best for you, your family and your career. Most people will respect that. You will have a few bosses that will try to guilt you about it, but they are simply looking out for themselves. Just be honest and move on.

    Congrats.

    This is exactly how I feel. I put my notice in yesterday and it was very difficult but I have to take care of my family at all costs and this new opportunity will do just that.
    "If your dreams dont scare you - they ain't big enough" - Life of Dillon
  • MooseboostMooseboost Senior Member Member Posts: 775 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I have never left a position on bad terms, with the exception of one purchasing job. It is never an easy task, but in the end - you have to do what is best for you. I always try to make it work where I am, but if there is just no chance of moving up then you have to move out. That is how it was in my previous job - I tried my best to position myself to move up but the opportunity was not there and wouldn't be for years.
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  • NansNans Member Posts: 160
    Congratulations on your new job and dont be too shy
    2016 Certification Goals: CCNP Route /COLOR][B][/B][I][B]X[/B][/I][COLOR=#008000-->Switch/COLOR]:study:[COLOR=#ff8c00-->TShoot[], CCDP []
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