job boards and certs needed

ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
From time to time, people on TE will tell others to check the job boards in your area, to see what certs are needed for that area.

What do you do, when there are hardly ever any jobs posted?

I want to choose a path that not only do I like, but that wouldn't be a waste of time in my area. I am one of those fools, who really likes Cisco networking side, as well as the Microsoft/Linux server side.

But I would like to focus and then eventually specialize. Like if I go the Cisco route and stay there, I would go for my CCNP or higher or specialized. Flip side is MCSA to MCSE and even Linux certs.

So in summary, how do I find out what the hot certs are for my geographic location, when little to no jobs are posted?

Comments

  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    Chadius wrote: »
    What do you do, when there are hardly ever any jobs posted?


    You move.... Gotta go where the jobs are.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Member Posts: 1,040 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Chadius wrote: »
    From time to time, people on TE will tell others to check the job boards in your area, to see what certs are needed for that area.

    What do you do, when there are hardly ever any jobs posted?

    I want to choose a path that not only do I like, but that wouldn't be a waste of time in my area. I am one of those fools, who really likes Cisco networking side, as well as the Microsoft/Linux server side.

    But I would like to focus and then eventually specialize. Like if I go the Cisco route and stay there, I would go for my CCNP or higher or specialized. Flip side is MCSA to MCSE and even Linux certs.

    So in summary, how do I find out what the hot certs are for my geographic location, when little to no jobs are posted?

    TIPS

    You can start with a cert search on google in your area then....

    1. dice, indeed, or google search
    2. Craigslist - make sure to select jobs posted today or the past week
    3. ziprecruiter or bartech talent network
    4. Meetup.com - a good way to meet with people that are in the field you want to be in
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/Collab Member Posts: 959 ■■■■■■■□□□
    If there are not a lot of jobs in your immediate area, I would look at the jobs posted in the other major cities close to you. If that doesn't work switch to looking at the major cites in the states close to the state you are living in. That should give you an idea.

    I don't see a problem with getting the lower microsoft and linux certs and then going deep in the area you choose. That's what I plan on doing.
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Member Posts: 1,040 ■■■■□□□□□□
    You can always come to Virginia, Maryland or DC!!!! We have plenty of jobs here!
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I would love to move. Wife isn't on board with leaving family etc. (also have kids in school) This might change in a couple of years. But not anytime soon.

    I am trying to maximize my skills vs certs vs degree for my area. Then if needed, leave the area when my son graduates and joins the army.

    It would suck to finish the CCNA, and get no traction out of it here. Then have to start the MCSA later when I find out the CCNA was a bust for flat lands Kansas. lol
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Looking at the CCNA, CCNP, MCSA, and MCSE jobs for Kansas....and a lot of the jobs are asking for a cert from both sides. (i.e. CCNA and MCSA, etc)

    So I guess I just need to keep on the route I am doing.

    Or am I falling for the employer wish list of job descriptions? lol
  • ITSpectreITSpectre Member Posts: 1,040 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Chadius wrote: »
    Looking at the CCNA, CCNP, MCSA, and MCSE jobs for Kansas....and a lot of the jobs are asking for a cert from both sides. (i.e. CCNA and MCSA, etc)

    So I guess I just need to keep on the route I am doing.

    Or am I falling for the employer wish list of job descriptions? lol

    Im learning that you don't really need 100% of what is in the description.... But it helps to get the certs that will get you past the filters. Me for example all I have is a Sec+ and A MTA... that is only going to get me so far. I need some more certs and a degree if I want to get where I want to be.
    In the darkest hour, there is always a way out - Eve ME3 :cool:
    “The measure of an individual can be difficult to discern by actions alone.” – Thane Krios
  • MowMow Member Posts: 445 ■■■□□□□□□□
    You can search for Cisco Partners in your area and see if there are any job openings. Some places keep job postings up for a long time, even if they're closed, so you can have some reference as to what they were looking for when they had a position.

    https://locatr.cloudapps.cisco.com/WWChannels/LOCATR/openBasicSearch.do
  • TrucidoTrucido Member Posts: 250 ■■□□□□□□□□
    The cool thing about being a network engineer/network administrator (my goal) is that you can literally go anywhere in the world, and your skills would be needed at pretty much every company. Thats the best job security type job that I can think of, and I wouldn't mind moving from Ohio to Florida / TX/ Cali/ ect if the pay is worth while.

    I guess it's all situational though. I dont have kids, my girlfriend would move no problems, ect ect.


    Id say the best way to find out what is needed in your area is to network with different recruiters for jobs in your line of work or what certs you're going for. If 20 different companies dont have any of those jobs, it probably means there arent many out there.
    2017 Certification Goals
    CompTIA A+ [ ] CompTIA Net+ [ ] CompTIA Sec+ [ ] CCENT [ ] ITIL [ ]
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Good idea guys.

    Another issue, is having the CCNA and doing CCNA type work is two different things. My lab at home has Cisco equipment, but working daily in an environment with it, is another thing. So how am I supposed to know if I like working with Cisco and doing networking, if I am only 1 inch deep into it so far? (maybe more than 1 inch, but not too deep)
  • MowMow Member Posts: 445 ■■■□□□□□□□
    In my experience it is different, but not enough to make you change your mind about networking, IMO. You will creep into many different areas of infrastructure, because everything rides on route/switch. Also, a greenfield lab is a lot different than a production network. Once you're comfortable with the CCNA topics in the lab, you can imagine it will include those, but with greater complexity and more variety. Throw into the mix past admins who didn't know what they were doing and it can get frustrating at times. But if you like it so far, you'll probably like it going forward.
  • sandman748sandman748 Member Posts: 104
    Keep up with the CCNA. Even if you move into another area of expertise (virtualization, cloud, whatever) all of it rides on top of the network. Understanding that at the CCNA level will only make you better in those respective areas. So many server admins who can't grasp the basic concepts of how their traffic gets from point A to point B it is amazing. Although I'm sure those guys say the same thing about me when I ask stupid questions about their stuff.
    Working on CCIE Collaboration:
    Written Exam Completed June 2015 ~ 100 hrs of study
    Lab Exam Scheduled for Dec 2015
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    True. I get what your saying.

    We have a data center of sorts, but I only switch out failed units. Which has happened once. They come pre-configured to us from our network team. So just the nuts and bolts, no configs at all really. Sucks. lol
  • revboxrevbox CompTIA: A+, Network+, Security+, Project+, CySA+ ISC2: SSCP Little Rock, ARMember Posts: 90 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I wouldn't sweat it that much. With remote/offshore/cloud becoming all the rage, it isn't like you are tied to only working for your immediate physical area. I live in Arkansas where our cost of living is super low compared to the rest of the country and thus our per capita income is low also. We're the type of state where a salary of 30 - 40 K a year can support a family of 3 or 4 and be middle class. This makes us super attractive to surrounding major metro areas (OKC, Dallas, Memphis, St. Louis, New Orleans) where we can support remotely (network/dba/app support) and work in tandem with your standard hardware tech/rack-and-stack equipment guy and get paid 20 K a year less than someone with a similar skill set that'd be local to them.
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    The cost of living is low in my area as well. You have a good point. Obviously you would need the chops before they would let you remote work.

    Sounds like I should stay my course, finish my CCNA, and then hope someone gives a fresh CCNA guy a chance? Because all I seem to be able to get, is desktop support jobs. (which I am super tired of, and more skilled than the positions are asking for)
  • ClmClm CISSP | CCSP | CCSK | AWS x 4 | ITIL | PCEP Member Posts: 444 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I would say start looking for some remote positions i know a lot of networking and security positions can be remote
    I find your lack of Cloud Security Disturbing!!!!!!!!!
    Connect with me on LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/myerscraig

  • revboxrevbox CompTIA: A+, Network+, Security+, Project+, CySA+ ISC2: SSCP Little Rock, ARMember Posts: 90 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Someone will give you a chance if you have a CCNA, especially companies who want to lowball and not hire someone with a higher cert. Think of an environment that is already setup and they just need someone to keep the lights on and occasionally add new firewall rules along with port management on enterprise switches. Also, I hear you on the desktop support stuff. Ever since I joined LinkedIn and started listing stuff I get plenty of those offers where you work part-time for 3rd party vendors on an on-call basis. No thanks bro.
  • beadsbeads Senior Member Member Posts: 1,511 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Remote work? This site is only concerned with remote work though many still have some travel requirements. The down side to working virtually is there will be virtually no chance for promotion and many junior to mid level types fail due to the lack of daily work structure. Its a mixed blessing but a nightmare for HR.

    https://www.virtualvocations.com/
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I'll look into it.

    I did some searching in Indeed, Simply Hired, CareerBuilder, etc. Instead of just typing CCNA or MCSA, I typed Network Engineer and System Admin.
    Ton of system admin type jobs in my area, versus any network gigs. The network gigs are all asking for 5+ years experience. The systems jobs are 3+.

    But there is also 3 times the jobs on Indeed at least.
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 897 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Don't worry, there are plenty of jobs in this area. I'll actually be sitting for my MCSA Server 2012 exam next month so I'll hopefully have that knocked out. Depending on what your long term goal is career wise may push you more to the CCNA or MCSA. As far as the experience asked for, its usually garbage for the most part. :) Go for what you like and you'll do well. And if you do move, figure out a shorter move, like KC. Lots going on up there and lots of career growth too.
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Yea I'll check out the options after my ccna is complete. Good luck on the mcsa. I studied for the 2008 version but never day for the first test.
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 897 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Thanks man. I'm sure once you have that CCNA it will help open up a few doors for you. :) I'm debating on that being my next step after I whoop the MCSA's butt, or if I should go towards the MCSE: SI. I really want to be as well rounded as possible. :)
  • ChadiusChadius Member Posts: 313 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Either way. I want to specialize. Cisco or Microsoft route. I have always wanted to get that upper echelon cert. (ever since the MCSE 2003 was on the market and same with the CCIE) I have friends that have done those and it was a life changer for them. Not saying that it would be that way for me, but it shouldn't hurt. ;)

    I was really close to changing my degree at WGU. Switch over to the Network Admin degree. But the thought of doing the MCSA on WGU's time limit, seemed daunting. That and they have crap for study materials. lol I'm still thinking of doing it. Just finish the CCNA on my dime. (also because I am not sure I can pass it before the deadline for the new test to come out) Just giving myself leeway.
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