Which is more valuable: MCSA or VCP?

Murph2390Murph2390 Member Posts: 11 ■□□□□□□□□□
So my boss gave me the choice of taking a classroom course paid by the company. I'm leaning toward the VMware class because playing around the Vsphere is so much fun. However, the other option is Microsoft and a lot of the VM's we run are Server 2012. So I need help deciding

Comments

  • dave330idave330i Member Posts: 2,091 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Check few job sites to see which cert is more in demand in your area.
    2018 Certification Goals: Maybe VMware Sales Cert
    "Simplify, then add lightness" -Colin Chapman
  • bettsy584bettsy584 Member Posts: 69 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Go with VMware mate, as it's only of the only certifications that you MUST go on a training course to get. It's not all about certifications, but it's worth baring in mind as if your looking at "value" you are probably looking at what it can add to you as a person.

    Microsoft is easier to pick up on your own as you can lab along with CBT Nuggets/Pluralsight with a single laptop. That's more difficult that VMware as you would have to nest the entire environment.

    The decision should also come down to your day to day job. Do what you are actually going to use, I have 30+ certifications, some of which are pieces of paper I wasted hours of my life getting.
  • markulousmarkulous Member Posts: 2,394 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Eh, just depends on what you want to do. If you're going to an environment where you're managing VMware systems, then the VCP is probably better suited for that. If it's more of a generalist Systems Admin in a Windows environment then maybe the MCSA would be better.
  • NorrisMcWherterNorrisMcWherter Member Posts: 13 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Get your work to pay for your VMWare course as its very expensive and will complement your CCNA well. Then go self study do your MCSA, which is cheaper, and sits "on top" of VMWare and Cisco tech. You'll then have your IT base knowledge to go specialise from. Simples.
  • snokerpokersnokerpoker Member Posts: 661 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I would go with VMWare all the way. Their certs seem to be more in demand + if your boss/company is paying for it... even better!
  • bettsy584bettsy584 Member Posts: 69 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Good choice! Like someone else said, a Cisco CCNA (or equivalent knowledge) is really required to truly understand VMware Networking. The amount of VMware VCP's I have come across who do not know the basics of subnets, VLAN's, routing, trunking, tagging etc is scary.

    VMware networking is easy to understand when you know about all these things, difficult if you don't. I suggest INE's CCNA course if you are looking to ramp up your networking. I have watched the course twice over the last 3-5 years.
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 968 ■■■■■■■□□□
    The VCP is probably more valuable.... but only "artificially".

    The MCSA can be attained entirely through selfstudy.
    but VMWARE requires you to take their $3,000 bootcamp (before sitting the exam).

    So, if you wanted to hedge your bets... get the boss to pay for the vmware class.

    However, i think VMware is in a downward trend (personal opinion).
    Microsoft's Hyper-V got a very late start, but they have already caught vmware in terms of capabilities. (Arguably, they may have surpassed them)
    Also, where Vmware charges for all their features; MS inlcudes everything out the box.

    I wouldn't be surprised if VMware eventually fades into a RIM/blackberry...

    /endrant
  • bettsy584bettsy584 Member Posts: 69 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Agreed with volfkhat. VMware is dying, whether the VMware fan boys want to admit it or not. Mainly due to cloud, and Vmwares ridiculous licensing model.

    Also like you said Hyper-V is as good (if not better) now. VMware will always be a thing and exist, but it will be a side line skill IMO as most businesses move to cloud and PaaS/IaaS.

    That being said if your in a company using VMware and you are not thinking about going consulting anytime soon, get to know it, and properly.
  • dave330idave330i Member Posts: 2,091 ■■■■■■■■■■
    Would have thought IT folks would have better understanding of what VMware did as a company. icon_cry.gif
    2018 Certification Goals: Maybe VMware Sales Cert
    "Simplify, then add lightness" -Colin Chapman
  • TacoRocketTacoRocket Member Posts: 497 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I think a mix of both would be helpful for you. I see a lot of people asking for VCP and MCSA.
    These articles and posts are my own opinion and do not reflect the view of my employer.

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  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 968 ■■■■■■■□□□
    bettsy584 wrote: »
    Agreed with volfkhat. VMware is dying, whether the VMware fan boys want to admit it or not. Mainly due to cloud, and Vmwares ridiculous licensing model. Also like you said Hyper-V is as good (if not better) now. VMware will always be a thing and exist, but it will be a side line skill IMO as most businesses move to cloud and PaaS/IaaS. That being said if your in a company using VMware and you are not thinking about going consulting anytime soon, get to know it, and properly.
    Yep.... what she said :]
  • 9bits9bits Member Posts: 138 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Excuse my ignorance, but help me understand the separation between VMWare and Cloud services. To my understanding, most cloud services use virtualization, and a lot of them use VMWare. So even if your company isn't directly using virtualization, it would seem your cloud service provider probably is. So VMWare used locally or remotely is still VMWare being used.

    Now, perhaps some other virtualization platform is increasing in market share, in which case there may be merit to the claim of VMWare dying. But I don't see the shift to cloud services as being direct evidence.
  • bettsy584bettsy584 Member Posts: 69 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Cloud architecture mate, loosely coupled applications etc. Apps are moving away from being server orientated. Have a look at things like the Azure Cloud Design Patterns.

    Virtualization is not dying, but VMware are. They fired 1,000 people at the start of the year. Most companies don't need things like NSX, View, vCloud if they are going to consume cloud services, therefore VMware are going to be niche to the large enterprise market.

    P.S - only crap private clouds use VMware, Azure/AWS/GCP don't. Private Cloud is not cloud IMO, it's hosted Data Center with some orchestration/billing tools.

    Only my opinion. I am sure it will cause a stir with the VMware huggers.
  • LexluetharLexluethar Member Posts: 516
    Vmware bc to be a VCP you must take the course, someshing that costs like $3,000. You can simply study and take the Microsoft exams to be certified (not saying it isn't hard bc it is but a class isn't a requirement.
  • bettsy584bettsy584 Member Posts: 69 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I do, they are desperate to get into true cloud services but can't get past the simple IaaS services, like with vCloud. They then offer other products (which are great), but demand is going to slow. For example, companies are going to consume things like VDI from AWS, using something like Workspaces, instead of deploying View.

    NSX etc, is only going to fit private clouds or massively large enterprises.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure / Core Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016 Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    The short answer: have your company pay for the mandatory VCP class, then take that exam. Study for the MCSA exams on your own, since they don't require classes to qualify for the cert, they just need you to take the exams.

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  • dave330idave330i Member Posts: 2,091 ■■■■■■■■■■
    bettsy584 wrote: »
    I do, they are desperate to get into true cloud services but can't get past the simple IaaS services, like with vCloud. They then offer other products (which are great), but demand is going to slow. For example, companies are going to consume things like VDI from AWS, using something like Workspaces, instead of deploying View.

    NSX etc, is only going to fit private clouds or massively large enterprises.

    Guessing you haven't read the Q2 2016 earning report.
    2018 Certification Goals: Maybe VMware Sales Cert
    "Simplify, then add lightness" -Colin Chapman
  • LexluetharLexluethar Member Posts: 516
    Regardless of people's vmware views let's stay on topic and help the OP.

    Vmware if you want to have yourself $3,000 if you plan on taking that exam anyways.
  • thatguy67thatguy67 Member Posts: 344 ■■■■□□□□□□
    When I was going to interviews last last year, everyone was "impressed" the most with my VCP. Probably because of the cost though.
    2017 Goals: []PCNSE7 []CCNP:Security []CCNP:R&S []LCDE []WCNA
  • Mike7Mike7 Member Posts: 1,107 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Agree with the posters.

    From a certification standpoint, go for VMware training as the certification requires you to take their class.
    You can self-study and take the MCSA exams.

    From job scope perspective current and future; it depends on what you will be doing. Will you be doing vSphere related tasks? Or more Microsoft domain admin tasks such as GPOs? Go for the one that will make you more productive.

    As for VMware vs Microsoft; it depends on your company investment, existing expertise and the VM OS mix. Microsoft Hyper-V is great for pure Microsoft shops but not so good with Linux. I had my share of fun with RHEL/CentOS core **** (Linux equivalent of Windows BSOD) whenever the kernels are updated and conflicted with Microsoft Linux integration components.
  • KyrakKyrak CISSP, PMP, MCSE CP&I, VCP5/6, CCNA R&S/Sec/Cyber Ops, ITIL, A+/N+/Sec+ Member Posts: 143 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Slowhand wrote: »
    The short answer: have your company pay for the mandatory VCP class, then take that exam. Study for the MCSA exams on your own, since they don't require classes to qualify for the cert, they just need you to take the exams.
    +1 I took my VCP before my MCSA as well. For recruiter search word purposes, MCSA is will get you more hits (just go search Dice for VCP vs MCSA), but for your question, get work to pay for the VCP then get MCSA on your own.
    Up next: On Break, but then maybe CCNA DC, CCNP DC, CISM, AWS SysOps Administrator
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 968 ■■■■■■■□□□
    thatguy67 wrote: »
    When I was going to interviews last last year, everyone was "impressed" the most with my VCP. Probably because of the cost though.

    I'll bet those same People are easily impressed by shiny objects.

    Personally, i'm more impressed by your novell CLA ;]
  • powerfoolpowerfool Senior Member Member Posts: 1,658 ■■■■■■■■□□
    +1 more for VMware. As mentioned, it requires a classroom course to get the certification. You can self-study for whichever MCSA you are looking to sit.
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