Advice for next cert - done with Cisco

nickelitonickelito Member Posts: 54 ■■□□□□□□□□
Hey guys.

So after completing the CCNP R&S I figured it is time for me to focus on something different for a while.
Might come back later to pursue the SP or Sec certifications but right now I feel that its time for me to add some extra value to my resume - not just R&S knowledge.

The problem is that I have no idea what to go for...
Security is always good I guess, Virtualization is hot I guess, Linux is something I would like to get more depth in - not sure if a cert is the right place for that though.. Python would be nice to be fluent in - although definitely not cert-viable.

So what is your thoughts? What would add value to my profile, be rewarding and also good for the future?
I was going for the CCIE R&S for a few months but I just couldn't continue as it felt very dated and not really worth it for me since i need to build on other areas than plain old R&S...

I've been working as a Network engineer for 5+ years and have ofc been exposed to most areas mention above - although there are some gaps here and there since I haven't officially studied for any of it.

Not really sure an entry level cert like Security+ would be worth it for me, but still.. gotta start somewhere and building a nice foundation is never a bad thing.

Certs that comes to mind:

CEH - Sounds cool but dont know much about it. Is it basic or does it hold some value?
SCPE - Network testing cert. Will be available for me through work. Hardly known by anyone but could add some flavour.
CISSP - Obtaining this one would be cool for sure, but I dont know how much work it is and how long time to study we are talking about. I'm not looking for an easy-to-get cert but certainly not a monster like CCIE either.
RHSCA - Would be really cool to pursue and get a paper on decent Linux knowledge. But how valuable is this cert really?
COA - Openstack cert, will probably be able to get this through work.

Others...

CCNA Security - I know, I said I'm done with Cisco for now, but this seem to hold a pretty high value in the market so if this is the best next step then sure, I'm game.
Vmware/Citrix - Not really interested. At all.

tl;dr
Me = CCNP with 5 years of networking exp. Help me choose whats next!

Comments

  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • dmoore44dmoore44 Member Posts: 646
    With your networking knowledge and a virtualization cert, you'd be primed for a devops role. The OpenStack cert sounds interesting, but i'm not sure it has much demand. You might be better off with the VMware or Citrix certs mentioned by @ajs1976, or you might also consider the AWS or Azure tracks.
    Graduated Carnegie Mellon University MSIT: Information Security & Assurance Currently Reading Books on TensorFlow
  • ccie14023ccie14023 Member Posts: 183
    Why do you say the CCIE R&S is "dated"? The material is or the certification?
  • TheFORCETheFORCE Senior Member Member Posts: 2,298 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I wouldn't go much into citrix, i know a lot of places are stilling using it but even they are trying to getaway from Citrix, especially with VDI getting more and more mainstream and available.
  • nickelitonickelito Member Posts: 54 ■■□□□□□□□□
    ccie14023 wrote: »
    Why do you say the CCIE R&S is "dated"? The material is or the certification?


    In my opinion, both.
    Dont get me wrong - I'd love to be holding the cert but looking at where I am in my career I there is just no point for me to prove with another cert that I know how switching and routing works,,,

    With the time and effort put into getting the CCIE, I would get 3-4 other certs in other areas and that would be more beneficial for me since I work as a consultant and need to be broad in my tech knowledge.

    Also, I am not sure how the demand will look for CCIE-level knowledge in the upcoming years.
    Personally, I think that there will be more demand for, say a CCNP with coding and virtualization skills than a pure die hard networking guy.
    I think hybrids will be high in demand - Devops, if you will.

    There are already so many R&S specialists out there, but how easy is it for a company to get hold of someone who knows Openstack inside out?
  • joelsfoodjoelsfood Member Posts: 1,027 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Yeah, but how many companies are using openstack vs how many companies have networks? ;)
  • nickelitonickelito Member Posts: 54 ■■□□□□□□□□
    joelsfood wrote: »
    Yeah, but how many companies are using openstack vs how many companies have networks? ;)

    Well, another question is "how many companies are constantly trying to cut down on IT-costs and what will tomorrows tech allow them to do with the network?"

    Myself, I'd rather prepare for learning all about tomorrows networks than yesterdays - and that is what CCIE is all about in my opinion, becoming an expert on configuring Cisco's switches/routers that even Cisco themselves are moving away from!

    This is a bit off-topic, but I'll bite...
    What I'm saying is that where the industry is currently moving towards, I would be better off proving that I know Linux or virtualization for example than ticking of another networking cert..

    It's obvious that I know networking by now, job exp + CCNP says so.. do I really need another cert proving that?
    Ofc, CCIE is the top of the food chain but how much market value will it hold 5 years from now?
    SDN isn't just a fad, neither is virtualization and Linux is here to stay too..

    Manually configuring MP-BGP, QoS and Multicasting? - dont count on it!

    If I was to go for 2 years of 4 hours studying per day I'd at least want to know that what I am studying for will be relevant in the SDN era - which CCIE is not.
  • mbarrettmbarrett Member Posts: 397 ■■■□□□□□□□
    nickelito wrote: »
    Myself, I'd rather prepare for learning all about tomorrows networks than yesterdays - and that is what CCIE is all about in my opinion, becoming an expert on configuring Cisco's switches/routers that even Cisco themselves are moving away from!
    They are shifting focus to growth areas for the company, but moving away from them? They are the industry leader, and there hasn't been anything to indicate reduced demand that I've seen. Many of the traditional route+switch technologies are evolving to exist in software form rather than encased in hardware, but that doesn't mean the technology is becoming obsolete. Even as the technology evolves to be less visible, there's always a demand for people who know the vital, intricate technology that moves data around.

    To answer your original question, there is the Cisco Network Programmability Developer Specialist if you want to focus more on Python, development etc. and a couple others related to that. It sounds like you might just have to try different projects/jobs until you find the thing that really gets you interested & fired up.
  • SeekBytesSeekBytes Member Posts: 143
    Hi, Joel.

    What's your view ? I am nearly there with the CCNP RS and I have exactly the same questions.

    I am sure that network virtualization and network programmability are two important areas, but I am not sure where to start.

    Kind Regards.
  • kiki162kiki162 Member Posts: 635
    Doing Sec+ is a good place to start, you could also go for the SSCP and then the CISSP. CCNA Security also sounds like a good option too. For RedHat, unless you wanna get into sysadmin work, it's not worth it.

    Look like SANS/GIAC courses too. Doing GSEC is also a good one to do after CISSP.
  • VeritiesVerities Member Posts: 1,162
    Can't go wrong with OpenStack, its hot and going to get hotter:

    https://www.openstack.org/user-stories/
  • nickelitonickelito Member Posts: 54 ■■□□□□□□□□
    kiki162 wrote: »
    Doing Sec+ is a good place to start, you could also go for the SSCP and then the CISSP. CCNA Security also sounds like a good option too. For RedHat, unless you wanna get into sysadmin work, it's not worth it.

    Look like SANS/GIAC courses too. Doing GSEC is also a good one to do after CISSP.

    How does CEH hold up against certs like SSCP and CCNA Sec?
  • Node ManNode Man Member Posts: 668 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I agree with a bunch of you. CCNP R&S with a couple lower certs - such as Linux+, VMWare or Citrix, etc, sounds more employable than just a CCIE.
  • SeekBytesSeekBytes Member Posts: 143
    I think that I also struggle a bit with thinking about the next step.

    CCIE was something I was interested in learning for getting deeper in certain areas of routing and switching that I did not touch with the NP track.

    Regardless the old debate between SDN and the CCIE, I think that there's much more demand for virtualization and cloud. A good CCNP definitely helps with the underlying network. Now I am wondering if I have to pick an operative system and which hypervisor I should be learning.

    I had a few paths in mind:

    RHCSA, KVM/Esxi/ OpenStack.
    MCSA/E, Esxi/Azure

    I am curious to know what other think.

    Kind Regards
  • chrisonechrisone Senior Member Member Posts: 2,130 ■■■■■■■■■□
    What is your career goal? where do you see yourself employed in 5 years and what type of job do you see yourself doing?

    You are getting lost in CCIE vs SDN vs What the future holds vs Your current experience vs Other people experience......
    Certs: CISSP, OSCP, CRTP, eCPPT, eCIR, LFCS, CEH, AZ-900, VHL:Advanced+, Retired Cisco CCNP/SP/DP
    2020 Goals:
    Courses: VHL (completed), CQURE: Windows Security Crash Course (completed), BlackHills InfoSec: Breaching the Cloud (completed), eLearnSecurity: WAPTv3 (completed), IHRP (completed), THPv2 (completed), PTXv2 (in-progress)
    Certs: VHL: Advanced+ (completed), OSCP (completed), AZ-500 (failed 1st attempt), eLearnSecurity: eWPT (failed 2x, no further attempts), eLearnSecurity: eCIR (complete), eLearnSecurity: eCTHPv2 (report: awaiting results), eLearnSecurity: eCPTXv2 (Late-Nov)
  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    nickelito wrote: »
    Personally, I think that there will be more demand for, say a CCNP with coding and virtualization skills than a pure die hard networking guy.
    I think hybrids will be high in demand - Devops, if you will.


    I couldn't agree more and have already been heading down this path myself for the past couple years. My openstack cert and experience, even though pretty high level at this point, has already gotten me quite a bit of attention on the job market.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • dmoore44dmoore44 Member Posts: 646
    SeekBytes wrote: »
    I think that I also struggle a bit with thinking about the next step.

    CCIE was something I was interested in learning for getting deeper in certain areas of routing and switching that I did not touch with the NP track.

    Regardless the old debate between SDN and the CCIE, I think that there's much more demand for virtualization and cloud. A good CCNP definitely helps with the underlying network. Now I am wondering if I have to pick an operative system and which hypervisor I should be learning.

    I had a few paths in mind:

    RHCSA, KVM/Esxi/ OpenStack.
    MCSA/E, Esxi/Azure

    I am curious to know what other think.

    Kind Regards

    OpenStack isn't really a virtualization platform like Hyper-V/ESX/Xen/KVM - it's an orchestration platform that allows you to manage several hypervisors as well as your public cloud resources (AWS, Azure, etc...).

    If you're interested in OpenStack, make sure to also check out OneOps. They offer similar features, but OpenStack is much more robust.
    Graduated Carnegie Mellon University MSIT: Information Security & Assurance Currently Reading Books on TensorFlow
  • nickelitonickelito Member Posts: 54 ■■□□□□□□□□
    So if i wanted to go for a VCP certification, would it be logical to take the NV or the DCV?
  • CE1028CE1028 Member Posts: 84 ■■□□□□□□□□
    nickelito wrote: »
    So if i wanted to go for a VCP certification, would it be logical to take the NV or the DCV?

    IMO Both. Normally, I'd say you if don't have much virtualization experience, then I'd start with the VCP-DCV and then take the VCP-NV. The issue is VMware requires you to take one of their courses to get the VCP-DVC. However, since you have the CCNP R&S, you can take the VCP-NV without taking one of their courses. Then once you have an existing VCP, you can take the VCP-DCV without one of their courses too
  • nickelitonickelito Member Posts: 54 ■■□□□□□□□□
    CE1028 wrote: »
    IMO Both. Normally, I'd say you if don't have much virtualization experience, then I'd start with the VCP-DCV and then take the VCP-NV. The issue is VMware requires you to take one of their courses to get the VCP-DVC. However, since you have the CCNP R&S, you can take the VCP-NV without taking one of their courses. Then once you have an existing VCP, you can take the VCP-DCV without one of their courses too

    Oh is that true? I dont need to take the courses because I have the CCNP? Great news!
  • CE1028CE1028 Member Posts: 84 ■■□□□□□□□□
    nickelito wrote: »
    Oh is that true? I dont need to take the courses because I have the CCNP? Great news!

    yup, that's only for VCP-NV though. Check path 2. Just FYI, VMware certs expire every 2 years
    https://mylearn.vmware.com/mgrReg/plan.cfm?plan=64294&ui=www_cert
  • chmodchmod Member Posts: 360 ■■■□□□□□□□
    RHCE, LPI and Linux+
  • varelgvarelg Banned Posts: 790
    @ chmod: I wonder how did you arrive to this conclusion: all of them, RHCE + LPI + Linux+?!
Sign In or Register to comment.