Mentorship in IT

CyberJosh95CyberJosh95 MemberPosts: 43Member ■■■□□□□□□□
Going to try to keep this as short as possible...

How do you guys feel about mentorship in IT? I feel as if that's what I am lacking. I've been working in an Network/Infrastructure work center for the past 3 years and am the lowest/youngest member on the totem poll. I have worked hard to gain knowledge in the career field by attending classes, seminars and obtaining certifications on my own. My co-workers all to seem to be complacent in their roles because of the job security and could care less about the development of the younger people(myself). Every time I mention to them that I am getting ready to test for a new certification, they ask me why am I worrying about that since I have a decent job already. I motivate myself and feel the urge to "grind hard" until i am at the level that i would like to be in my career ,but they do not seem to want to help motivate or help guide me in the right path. So, I come here to TechExams for motivation and guidance. Is it bad that i have to come online for guidance? I just want some type of mentorship.

Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Comments

  • TheFORCETheFORCE Posts: 2,233Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Going to try to keep this as short as possible...

    How do you guys feel about mentorship in IT? I feel as if that's what I am lacking. I've been working in an Network/Infrastructure work center for the past 3 years and am the lowest/youngest member on the totem poll. I have worked hard to gain knowledge in the career field by attending classes, seminars and obtaining certifications on my own. My co-workers all to seem to be complacent in their roles because of the job security and could care less about the development of the younger people(myself). Every time I mention to them that I am getting ready to test for a new certification, they ask me why am I worrying about that since I have a decent job already. I motivate myself and feel the urge to "grind hard" until i am at the level that i would like to be in my career ,but they do not seem to want to help motivate or help guide me in the right path. So, I come here to TechExams for motivation and guidance. Is it bad that i have to come online for guidance? I just want some type of mentorship.

    Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.


    Nothing wrong with coming online for mentor-ship. We all do it to some degree. If there is no one in your work place that will provide feedback or show you something new i suggest you find some local groups on MeetUp and join them or join the local chapters for the so many certifications out there. ISACA for example, has local chapters everywhere and they have meetings on a monthly basis, you have to pay to be a member its like $185 a year but you dont have to be certified in anything ISACA to attend. I'd go with the MeetUp groups first though if you want personal and face to face talks.
  • sillymcnastysillymcnasty Posts: 254Member
    This forum alone has given me so much more guidance than a single person could, actually. Many opinions!
  • iBrokeITiBrokeIT Posts: 1,155Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    1-on-1 mentoring is far from popular in the IT field because of the rapid rate of change.

    Instead, you should build a professional network from multiple sources where you can crowdsource your advice. Forums, LinkedIn groups, Twitter lists, subreddits, Slack channels, professional societies, conferences ect... so many that I can't even list them all.

    You seem like a smart guy, you don't need a mentor to hold your hand, you need to surround yourself with like minded professionals that will motivate you to be a better version of yourself so that you can find your path (sounds like your coworkers are not in that category).

    Best of luck.
  • EANxEANx Posts: 940Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    To be a little pop-culture, I'm going to point you to the episode of My Name is Earl (Netflix, near the end of season 2) where Earl wants to move from the back of the store from the front. It's a bonus episode for anyone who enjoys the movie "Rudy".

    Mentoring in IT can be tough. Go too low and you'll encounter the answers you did. Go too high (executives) and you'll find answers you can't use. I'd say your mentors should be at least two levels above you but no more than four. They have to have some relevant insight where you want to go but their perspective has to be such that they can actually understand where you are and where you want to go.
    2018: CCIE Written (R/S) (done - Jan), CCIE R/S
    After that: MBA, OSCP
  • networker050184networker050184 Posts: 11,962Mod Mod
    Don't worry you'll be making twice as much as those people in a few years if you keep it up. I've been through the same always being the youngest, or close to it, and being surrounded by complacent vets. Keep learning, keep improving and pay it forward when you're the vet.
    An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes which can be made.
  • MJK9550MJK9550 Posts: 160Member
    CyberJosh I'm with you man. I am the youngest and least experienced but I am constantly learning and pursuing new certifications. I was hoping to have more guidance and mentoring at my current job, but I am the only IT presence for my company in this state. So I am basically on my own, I learn things but not as much as I would like to be learning. This at least gives me the experience to move up and plenty of paid time to study for certifications so it's beneficial at the moment. I will be moving on to bigger and better things soon and I know you will be too! Start trying to set stuff up. Never stop learning and dedicate yourself to your IT trade of choice and we will be making plenty of $$ and be able to say we did it on our own(mostly)!
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Posts: 3,863Mod Mod
    ..Every time I mention to them that I am getting ready to test for a new certification, they ask me why am I worrying about that since I have a decent job already..


    They're trying to to convince you not to study and develop your skills because you're threatening their complacency. They will feel bad for not improving their own skills.

    Solution #1: do not tell them anything. keep quiet about your personal development

    Solution #2: at the same time, always be willing to help and always ask to be involved in whatever project that's happening.

    Solution #3: Start thinking of your next job, work towards it. Keep quiet.
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
  • CyberJosh95CyberJosh95 Member Posts: 43Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Just a follow up/update to this post.

    I am now moving my way up and we are now getting younger people. I make it a personal effort to enure everyone on my team are heading in the right direction.  Whether its IT or just life...

    What are some methods you guys use to help morale?
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Posts: 1,573Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I would say this site is the only mentor I have. Fortunately it's a good one!
  • promethuschowpromethuschow Member Northern VA, NYCPosts: 144Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    UnixGuy said:
    ..Every time I mention to them that I am getting ready to test for a new certification, they ask me why am I worrying about that since I have a decent job already..


    They're trying to to convince you not to study and develop your skills because you're threatening their complacency. They will feel bad for not improving their own skills.

    Solution #1: do not tell them anything. keep quiet about your personal development

    Solution #2: at the same time, always be willing to help and always ask to be involved in whatever project that's happening.

    Solution #3: Start thinking of your next job, work towards it. Keep quiet.
    Jon_Cisco said:
    I would say this site is the only mentor I have. Fortunately it's a good one!
    Both UnixGuy and Jon_Cisco has some wonderful tips for you, just follow them. I would emphasis on UnixGusy's tips # 2, whenever it is possible, be the volunteer man. At the same time be in the look out for all that is changing in the tech world, and try to have some high level knowledge about them.
  • ecuisonecuison Member Posts: 119Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I think a lot of people here including myself wouldn't mind mentoring anyone here or anywhere for that matter.  I think to some varying degree, everyone here is feeling or have felt what you have been going through.  

    Keep moving in the direction you want to go.  Keep yourself current and keep gaining more knowledge.  No one can take that away from you. 

    All the hard work eventually pays off in more than one way, be it advancement, a new job that will value what you bring, etc....

    Good luck, and don't let the "lifers" keep you down.
    Accomplishments: B.S. - Business (Information Management) | CISSP | CCSP | TOGAF v9.2 Certified | Security + | Network +
    In the 2019 Pipline: CRISC, AWS Certified Solutions Architect - Associate, Masters in Cybersecurity
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