Success rate when applying out of state

What are the general success rates when applying for jobs out of state? Anyone has any success doing this?

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  • networker050184networker050184 Mod Posts: 11,962 Mod
    I've had a lot of success. Most of my job changes have involved moving to a different state. In general I have no idea though. I'd assume the more senior level you are the more success you'll have though. Not a lot of companies looking to bring in help desk from out of state for example.
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  • steelodonsteelodon Member Posts: 103
    That is a great point.
  • Cisco InfernoCisco Inferno Member Posts: 1,034 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Yeah unless its like the middle of Kansas, no one wants to bring in a support person from out of state.

    I did have TONS of luck when i did move to Colorado from Miami.
    Also, if you are dealing with recruiters while still out of state, let them know that you already have a lease ,etc. They wont work for you if its not set in stone.
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  • apr911apr911 Member Posts: 380 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I moved from Pennsylvania to Texas, from Texas to California and from California back to Pennsylvania each time with/for a new job. The role in Texas was mid-level and everything after that has been more senior. As it has been noted, your success is likely to vary depending on the level.

    Few companies will intentionally recruit out of state for entry level positions but that doesn't mean they wont hire you if you are a good fit. With most large companies, your location in another state wont matter much unless they have an incredibly urgent need and your relocation will delay your start which again ties into your level and experience since how long they are willing to wait for you to start is proportionate to how long it would take to replace you (i.e. if the req was open for 6 months and it took them 3 months to recruit, interview and hire you they are unlikely to balk at a delayed start to allow you to move... Conversely if the req was open for 2 weeks and it took them all of an afternnon to recruit, interview and hire you, they are unlikely to allow you time to move and settle).

    The more senior you are, the more likely you'll be able to get the company to foot the bill for your relocation and the greater those relocation benefits are likely to be (ranging from a stipend to a full service moving company).
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  • Basic85Basic85 Senior Member Member Posts: 176 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I've been contacted by out of state recruiters and I'm not so sure that I can trust them. I have a hard trusting local recruiters but someone out of state?
  • alias454alias454 Member Posts: 648
    It depends on what skills you have that aren't easy to find in whatever local market you are looking to move to.
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  • JockVSJockJockVSJock Member Posts: 1,118
    apr911 wrote: »

    The more senior you are, the more likely you'll be able to get the company to foot the bill for your relocation and the greater those relocation benefits are likely to be (ranging from a stipend to a full service moving company).

    Also, you can write off the cost of your move on your taxes if your moving for a job/career that is so many miles. Just keep track of all of your costs (movers, boxing material and mileage).

    When I moved to Texas, I declined the company to move me because I wanted to re-coup that money for the move.

    Don't get caught in the mentality that no one wants to move you, you're going to have to move yourself to advance your career.
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  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 890 ■■■■■□□□□□
    steelodon wrote: »
    What are the general success rates when applying for jobs out of state? Anyone has any success doing this?

    Done it many times quite successfully. Each time I had an offer within 1 month of throwing my resume out into the wild in that area. Some will tell you to lie and use a local "fake" address, I personally wouldn't. I kept my out of town address on my resume and of course it will come up and they will ask why I'm looking to relocate and I'm honest about why I am. (Wife got a promotion, better schools for the kids, etc) Another option that is fine is to remove your address all together. It's easy to figure out if your current employer is in another state that either you work remote, or you are relocating to the area.

    I've done it now 4 times with great success and better success than I did when I applied locally before I looked out of state in the cases where I just wanted something better.
  • MeanDrunkR2D2MeanDrunkR2D2 MCSA: Server 2012, MCITP: EDA KCMember Posts: 890 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Yeah unless its like the middle of Kansas, no one wants to bring in a support person from out of state.

    I did have TONS of luck when i did move to Colorado from Miami.
    Also, if you are dealing with recruiters while still out of state, let them know that you already have a lease ,etc. They wont work for you if its not set in stone.


    ummmm...I did that. But only because my wife got a promotion and I needed a job there. Of course I left that job for a better one 6 months later.
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