Pass !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Sl@yer[email protected] Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Hey Everebody

I just passed my CCNA exam with a score of 987/1000

So, thanx for everyone who's been there for me

Comments

  • HumperHumper Posts: 647Member
    Would you mind providing some info on what you used to pass? BTW Congrats icon_lol.gif
    Now working full time!
  • upigradupigrad Posts: 8Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    hi,
    congrats on your success. i am really happy that someone achieved their goals.
    Kindly can u look at my results and give me suggestions on what i need to start doing more i have posted my results at the forum index.
    again congrats and thanks for looking at my post
    cheers
    Moving up to CCNP
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    Congratulations! :D

    Nice score -- take the rest of the day off and celebrate!

    What's next?
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • Sl@yer[email protected] Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    hi everyone

    Sorry for being late but I'll answer the questions that were asked above

    Regarding my study, I attended a CCNA course at New Horizons where the instructor was so great and deeply experienced and I had the chance to practice on real lab for Hands-on experience. Then, I studied the Cisco Press' INTRO and ICND Exam Preperation Guide and I reviewed the material with Sybex 5th Edition. I also used Boson NetSIM during the review.

    As for upigard, I really advise you not to focus on the exam. You should study the material deep enough so that exam questions will become second nature to you. There's no specific area to focus on when it comes to real job!!! However, I assure you that subnetting, frame-relay and routing protocols are among the most important topics on the exam...

    As for mikej412's question, I'm really confused and I need an advise here. I'm confused wheather to have an MCSE, CCDA or CWNA within the next few months since the CCNP course is REALLY costy and I'm willing to take when I graduate next year. So please, if anyone has an idea on what mo next step should be, don't save it for yourself!!!!

    I hope that you got the answers you wanted.

    Thanx
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    As for mikej412's question, I'm really confused and I need an advise here. I'm confused wheather to have an MCSE, CCDA or CWNA within the next few months since the CCNP course is REALLY costy and I'm willing to take when I graduate next year. So please, if anyone has an idea on what mo next step should be, don't save it for yourself!!!!

    If you have a lot of Microsoft experience (and have already been studying, then you might be able to get the MCSE within the next few months -- 7 exams is a lot. For the MCSE you might want to break it up into smaller chunks -- MCP, then MCSA, then MCSE. The MCP and maybe MCSA in the next few months could be more realistic -- but it again depends on your experience and the time you have to devote to certification exams.

    The CCDA is one exam on "fluffy topics" rather than technical topics -- more like technical interviewing skills and technical writing stuff and touchy-feelie customer requirement stuff. Its good because it gives you another Cisco Associate Level Certification -- but only a Cisco Business Partner may be interested in you because of this (or maybe a VAR -- but they'd most likely also be a Cisco Business Partner). At this level it seems to be good for cheap pre-sales support (for unqualified sales leads), rather than any heavy design work (but you have to start somewhere).

    The Cisco Press book Fundamentals of Campus Network Design (Teare & Paquet) came out just after I got my CCDA/CCDP. I'm not sure how helpful it would be for the Certifications, but I think it would be great to read to see if you like the design stuff -- and its a lot smaller than the certification books. If you read it and like -- then maybe consider Top-Down Network Design, 2nd Edition -- since this book does help with the certifications (both DA-DP). Then get the Cisco Press CCDA Certification books (if you're still awake) and study for the exam.

    The CCDA could fit in that few months you mentioned.... but could be of limited value depending on the opportunities in your area.

    Hum.... the CWNA..... could be useful. Again it depends on where you live and work and the opportunities. I'm guessing, but I figure eventually Cisco will come out with a Wireless Certification -- other than those CQSs.

    To get the most "Bang for the Buck" with your certification dollars -- the MCSA might be the best option. You get the MCP, and it shows progress towards the MCSE. And it works great with the CCNA for those entry level network admin positions. After that and some experience -- then target the CWNA, MCSE, or CCNP depending on your personal interest and which will help you advance in your career.
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • Sl@yer[email protected] Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanx man :)

    I guess I'm going to take the MCSE starting this summer

    I realy appreciate your help icon_wink.gif
  • uksmurfuksmurf Posts: 18Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Good work [email protected] - I passed yesterday and it's been a HUGE relief!!
  • duncnzduncnz Posts: 29Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    mikej412 wrote:
    To get the most "Bang for the Buck" with your certification dollars -- the MCSA might be the best option. You get the MCP, and it shows progress towards the MCSE. And it works great with the CCNA for those entry level network admin positions. After that and some experience -- then target the CWNA, MCSE, or CCNP depending on your personal interest and which will help you advance in your career.

    mikej412

    Really good post for those of us starting out. Just wondering what you think of A+ when it comes to those "entry level network admin positions?" I'm considering doing that once I've got CCNA but perhaps MCSA might be better, or maybe I should do both. Pretty sure I could pass the A+ without too much study. Was hoping to avoid getting into the MS route too deeply (MCSE) but is it just a fact of life now? Guess it depends a lot on what sort of job you get, hopefully I can get one with just CCNA...

    Well done [email protected], hope to join you soon!
  • remyforbes777remyforbes777 Posts: 499Member
    Not trying to bust your bubble, but unless you have previous experience as a net admin , an A+ is not going to give you the knowledge to even be an entry level net admin. You have to get some MS knowledge to be able to do that job. CCNA is more on the networking side, i.e. routers, switches, firewalls. MSCE deals with creating, and administering a Microsoft based network. If thats what you want to do then go the MCSE or MCSA route.
  • Sl@yer[email protected] Posts: 6Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    CCNA is more on the networking side, i.e. routers, switches, firewalls. MSCE deals with creating, and administering a Microsoft based network. If thats what you want to do then go the MCSE or MCSA route.

    You make a point here, but what should I do as a next step??

    I really appreciate your opinion

    Good work [email protected] - I passed yesterday and it's been a HUGE relief!!

    Gongrats!!! It's really a great relief......... icon_lol.gif
  • remyforbes777remyforbes777 Posts: 499Member
    Your path depends on what you want to do in life. What are you more passionate about, administering a network, or configuring switches and routers? If you want to be multi purpose, go for your MCSA instead of the MCSA. There are fewer tests to pass than the MCSE. That will give you a good base. You will know how to administer a Microsoft network and you will have a good base with configuring switches. The biggest task is figuring out what part of IT you want to specialize in.
  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    duncnz wrote:
    Just wondering what you think of A+ when it comes to those "entry level network admin positions?"

    The A+ is more useful for the MCPs (and deskside support and upgrading user PCs) ... and the server admin track (MCSA)... and even into the good stuff (MCSE and taking care of enterprise 2000/2003 servers).

    An A+ in a networking track just means that you might get to do the router memory upgrades -- while the other guys get to do the router configurations.

    If you are going to dual track -- servers & networking -- then the A+ is fine and useful.

    Everytime I hear A+ I think "entry level hardware" -- but its still more than that -- probably "entry level PC tech" might be a better description -- along with "entry level printer tech" ... etc
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • duncnzduncnz Posts: 29Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    mikej412 wrote:
    duncnz wrote:
    Just wondering what you think of A+ when it comes to those "entry level network admin positions?"

    The A+ is more useful for the MCPs (and deskside support and upgrading user PCs) ... and the server admin track (MCSA)... and even into the good stuff (MCSE and taking care of enterprise 2000/2003 servers).

    An A+ in a networking track just means that you might get to do the router memory upgrades -- while the other guys get to do the router configurations.

    If you are going to dual track -- servers & networking -- then the A+ is fine and useful.

    Everytime I hear A+ I think "entry level hardware" -- but its still more than that -- probably "entry level PC tech" might be a better description -- along with "entry level printer tech" ... etc

    Thanks mikej412, that's kind of what I thought. I'd only really be doing the A+ to give myself that little extra edge over someone that might have CCNA by itself. Also, I'm a practical kind of guy that likes to pull things apart (routers, computers, cars, whatever) and having worked with computers for years, A+ maybe just backs it up and suggests you can do a number of things over and above entry level Cisco stuff.
Sign In or Register to comment.