Career Advice - What Would You Do?

NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,407 ■■■■■■■■□□
Right now I'm contractor working on a IT project. The project is set to end in a year, but we have never been told as to when it will end. As of now, we are at the 6 month mark and the job is starting to slowing down.

Our senior manager emailed me and some of the other teams members, and mentioned there was an opening. Not everyone on the team got this email. We told not to tell everyone about this job.

The position calls field techs and follows up on cases. It was described to me as data entry heavy.
It's not something I'm interested.


Right now I'm applying to full time jobs, my hope is to get a full time IT job. I have been getting calls back too!!

My Questions:

1. Were you ever a contractor, what happened when the contract ended?

2. Would you take a job you feel you wouldn't like, just to pay the bills?

3. Do I trust that the recruiting company will get me a new job when the contract ends?
When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

--Alexander Graham Bell,
American inventor

Comments

  • UncleBUncleB Member Posts: 417
    1. Were you ever a contractor, what happened when the contract ended?

    2. Would you take a job you feel you wouldn't like, just to pay the bills?

    3. Do I trust that the recruiting company will get me a new job when the contract ends?

    1 - yes, many times. You know the approximate end date so you plan to have another job before this. If you don't have a job by this time and there is nothing else on the cards from the employers to tide you over then you need to have laid aside enough cash to se you through the lean times ahead.

    2 - yes. It is a fact of life that most of us have to pay the bills no matter what, but always keep looking for something that will advance your career while doing the work you don't like. You may not want to include the work on your CV is it isn't relevant to your career (especially if it is as a sex worker LOL) but if you include it the be prepared to be asked about it in interviews. I always found the best response when asked about such a deviation from the normal line of work was to be honest and tell them that you had to keep food on the plate - it shows you are a pragmatist and can respond sensibly when challenged instead of living in an ivory tower waiting for that next specialist gig to come along.

    3 - Not a chance. You are a resource to fill a gap they have and in all likelihood they will flush you like used toilet paper when it is finished. They owe no loyalty to you so don't expect it, but work on keeping them aware you would like to continue with them in a positive way just because there is a slim chance they will remember you if a similar role comes up. You are the only person you can count on so get out there and job hunt your ass off.

    Good luck in finding something out there.
  • volfkhatvolfkhat Member Posts: 947 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Yep,
    Yep,
    Nope.

    Unlike what "usually" happpens.... You actually know when your position is going away.
    SO start looking for your next gig.
    Most likely, your contract-house will toss you OUT-on-the-street when the contract ends.


    SO,
    i give credit to the email/person that sent you info about the other role.

    But if you don't like this data-entry job.... figure out what you do like... and take active steps to achieve it.

    You're gonna be okay. But definitely start looking :]
  • kiki162kiki162 Member Posts: 635
    1. Yes - it sucked, but knew it was coming.

    2. Been there done that. Do NOT rely on potential internal jobs to come through. Keep looking elsewhere, and stay away from temp jobs.

    3. Don't ever put your "eggs" in 1 basket. The only person that you can rely on is YOU. Start taking this time to make yourself more marketable. Go apply directly to a company and NOT through a 3rd party.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead CSM, ITIL x3, Teradata Assc, MS SQL Server, Project +, Server +, A+, N+, MS Project, CAPM, RMP Member Posts: 2,541 ■■■■■■■■■□
    1. Were you ever a contractor, what happened when the contract ended? Happened several times. Few times I impressed them so much I rolled into another position or was offered another position. Other times I had to hit the streets and find a new job. I usually started getting itchy about 75% through the contract.

    2. Would you take a job you feel you wouldn't like, just to pay the bills? Yes, if it was temporary. I was doing invoicing and reporting for 6 months after the tech portion of the project ended. The work was EASY and the pay was GOOD considering. Not something I would make a career out of but a 6 month break was NICE.

    3. Do I trust that the recruiting company will get me a new job when the contract ends? I don't think it's about trust, it's about if there is something available so I would keep my options open like kiki said.
  • mjnk77mjnk77 Member Posts: 164 ■■■□□□□□□□
    1. Were you ever a contractor, what happened when the contract ended? Yes. It was a two year contract at a DC, but they would bring you on before the two years if you were good, but let you go at two years if you weren't a good fit. When I was at 1.5 years they came to me to setup the onboard process, but before the paperwork was put through, there was a hiring freeze. They were bringing in an outside IT firm to outsource the jobs. I stayed on for another 1.5 until there was really no one left in the states.

    2. Would you take a job you feel you wouldn't like, just to pay the bills? If I wasn't able to collect unemployment, I'd take a job to make ends meet.

    3. Do I trust that the recruiting company will get me a new job when the contract ends? I liked the firm, but there were no jobs available. They said they'd let me know if something opened up, but I could see their job postings. Either I wasn't a fit, or I'd have to pack up and move and no guarantee it would work out. Remember, the recruiting firm makes money off you working, so they'll try and get you hired, but it may not be something you like or it could be something you're not right for.
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