Computer slow to load personal settings when logging in

madboymadboy Member Posts: 18 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hi everybody... i've been doing freelance tech work for a small company and I just helped them set up a new computer (Office install, anti-virus, printer set-ups, adding to the domain, etc). Nothing too hard.

The only thing is, when the computer is logging into their network, it takes a long time to load personal settings.

Now the only thing is, they get their DHCP from a D-link router, so I don't know if this is related.

-Is it something i should configure on the router to speed up connection to the network?

-They also have Active Directory. Not sure if there is something in here.

-Lastly, I was looking at the MSConfig command, startup tab. I don't know if there is something in here i could uncheck to make the login process faster.

Anyway, everything they've asked me to do has been easy, but now i feel like a bit of an idiot. I don't know if anyone else has experienced a similar problem of a slow login (personal settings). icon_confused.gif

Comments

  • TeKniquesTeKniques OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, CISA, SSCP, MCSE (03), Security+, Network+, A+, Project+ Member Posts: 1,262 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Sounds like a DNS problem to me. Check the other computers' DNS settings and make sure there is not a local DNS server you should be using instead of the ISP's.
  • mobri09mobri09 Users Awaiting Email Confirmation Posts: 723
    What kind of computers are they?
    How much memory do they have?
    Use msconfig and if your not sure what to uncheck, search google (there are many websites that will inform you what to uncheck.
    You also might want to think about using static DHCP rather than dynamic.
    It might speed up your network a tad.
    There is also a new great utility out called bootvis (freeware) which drastically enhances startup times.
    good luck
  • madboymadboy Member Posts: 18 ■□□□□□□□□□
    TeKniques wrote:
    Sounds like a DNS problem to me. Check the other computers' DNS settings and make sure there is not a local DNS server you should be using instead of the ISP's.

    Yeah i was thinking of that. I still want it to get an IP address automatically and a DNS server address automatically though, but i'll check the values on another computer. Or perhaps the other computers are using a particular DNS sever address.

    Thanks.
  • TeKniquesTeKniques OSCE, OSCP, CISSP, CISA, SSCP, MCSE (03), Security+, Network+, A+, Project+ Member Posts: 1,262 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Well in that case, I suggest you do the following:

    1. Set up a local DNS Server if there is none.
    2. Set up a DHCP server to distribute your addresses instead of the D-Link router and within the DHCP set it to distrbute the DNS address and default gateway as well.

    AD relies heavily on DNS (it is the main reason AD can function), when there are problems with DNS a lot of bad things can happen.

    Good luck.
  • forbeslforbesl Member Posts: 454
    If users are allowed roaming profiles on the domain, the personal settings and profile will always take time to load. Unless they frequently travel from computer to computer, it's best just to use local profiles on the domain instead of roaming profiles. Whoever the domain administrator is should be able to provide you with that info.

    In addition, if you are using AD, the DNS server IP on the workstations should be the AD domain controller's IP address. The AD domain controller should be set up to allow zone transfers with an external (the ISP or other service provider's) DNS server.
  • RussSRussS Member Posts: 2,068
    My first question would be .... what sort of logon do they have .. local or domain?

    Next - what sort of email are they running? Exchange, POP or IMAP?
    www.supercross.com
    FIM website of the year 2007
  • madboymadboy Member Posts: 18 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for all of the responses...

    Because of my time restraints, i won't be able to set up DHCP from the server even though i think this would help matters quite a bit. I'm not sure if DNS is service on the server or router... but that seems to be exactly where the issue is (both DHCP and DNS).

    The login is to the domain, and this is when it takes a long time to load personal settings.

    Email is a pop account.

    Anyway, i have a D-link router at home, so i might familiarize myself with the DHCP settings... honestly, they are going to need to get DHCP running from their server which is a job that needs a lot more time and at the moment, is something i need to learn more about.

    The job went from very easy to a bit more complicated. haha
  • RussSRussS Member Posts: 2,068
    OK - If they are logging into a domain it is a fair assumption that they will be dragging their profile over the network when they log in and shut down.
    That being the case - check the size of their profiles ... especially how big their pst or dbx files are and also how big their My Documents and Desktop are. At one client I was getting ripped about how slow their network was and when I investigated I found 800meg pst files gig plus My Documents and up to 2 gig in folders on their desktop.

    Needless to say I got a nice apology from that client icon_lol.gif
    www.supercross.com
    FIM website of the year 2007
  • TrailerisfTrailerisf Member Posts: 455
    madboy wrote:
    Thanks for all of the responses...

    Because of my time restraints, i won't be able to set up DHCP from the server even though i think this would help matters quite a bit. I'm not sure if DNS is service on the server or router... but that seems to be exactly where the issue is (both DHCP and DNS).

    The login is to the domain, and this is when it takes a long time to load personal settings.

    Email is a pop account.

    Anyway, i have a D-link router at home, so i might familiarize myself with the DHCP settings... honestly, they are going to need to get DHCP running from their server which is a job that needs a lot more time and at the moment, is something i need to learn more about.

    The job went from very easy to a bit more complicated. haha
    Setting up DHCP is a very easy task... Windows 2003 holds your hand the whole way... Start to finish in under 30 seconds... then turn off dhcp on your router....

    For DCHP setup you'll want to know the following IPS addresses ahead of time

    Gateway (ie your router)
    DNS
    WINS (you probably wont have so skip it)
    Broadcast address (ie 255.255.255.0 assuming no other subnets)

    Depending on how your network is setup, you will notice a huge difference on logons.... I fixed a new client's office network yesterday because they didnt have DHCP setup... logins were literally 15 minutes... now under 15 seconds.
    On the road to Cisco. Will I hunt it, or will it hunt me?
Sign In or Register to comment.