Starting off in Linux

Skyliinez92Skyliinez92 Level 99 WizardGielinor, UKPosts: 674Mod Mod
Hi all. I've spent a lot of time over at the CompTIA and MS forums, but I'm new to this dark side of TE icon_rolleyes.gif.

I want to start training myself in Linux and get a few certs from it. My end goal at the moment is to become a trained sysadmin in a Windows and Linux environment. I'm currently working towards my MCSE Server 2012/2016 and then plan doing Linux after.

I would like to know where to start as I haven't had a lot of experience in it yet. I've done a few Ubuntu and Fedora VMs at home on a graphical end, and spent a year working on Redhat v5 with a bit of AIX thrown in. I wasn't trained in Redhat, but the company who hired me decided to train me for the job so they didn't have to pay a full Linux-level salary. I got a fair bit of experience in it and even made myself a little command spreadsheet icon_rolleyes.gif.

Would it be worth going straight for the RHCSA? I don't think I need to do the Linux+, as I want to use it at an industry level and go for the big stuff. If I need to create Linux workstations I can use the experience I got from the VMs.

What would you guys recommend? I would like to hear how you guys started and what you used for training? I've seen sites like LinuxAcademy around which look useful. What would your advice be?

Thanks in advance!
Certs Achieved: CompTIA A+ | Net+ | Sec+, MTA NF (98-366), MTA OSF (98-349), MCTS: Win 7, MCP Win 10 (70-698)
Currently Studying: MCSA: Windows Server 2016 ( 70-740 | 70-741 | 70-742 )

"There are 10 types of people in this world; those who understand binary and those who don't." - Anon

Comments

  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Posts: 378Member
    Linux Academy 3 months free from Visual Studio on TechNet
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • shochanshochan Senior Member ArkansasPosts: 736Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Linux Academy 3 months free from Visual Studio on TechNet

    Do you have an URL?
    2018 goals -> PenTest+ Beta (failed), Linux+ Beta (pending results), CEH (mid Dec)
    2019 goals -> Linux+ 103/104 (Jan/Mar/Depends on Beta results), KLCP (June), RHCSA (Dec)
  • DoubleNNsDoubleNNs Posts: 2,013Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    I replied similarly in another thread - I'd first recommend starting w/ "The Linux Command Line" the book -- it'll teach you basic bash commands and ends up teaching some basic scripting. From there, a Linux Academy subscription would probably be best. They have tons of topics and domains on there.
    Goals for 2018:
    Certs: RHCSA, LFCS: Ubuntu, CNCF CKA, CNCF CKAD | AWS Certified DevOps Engineer, AWS Solutions Architect Pro, AWS Certified Security Specialist, GCP Professional Cloud Architect
    Learn: Terraform, Kubernetes, Prometheus & Golang | Improve: Docker, Python Programming
    To-do | In Progress | Completed
  • boxerboy1168boxerboy1168 Posts: 378Member
    Currently enrolling into WGU's IT - Security Program. Working on LPIC (1,2,3) and CCNA (and S) as long term goals and preparing for the Security+ and A+ as short term goals.
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    Hi all. I've spent a lot of time over at the CompTIA and MS forums, but I'm new to this dark side of TE icon_rolleyes.gif.

    I want to start training myself in Linux and get a few certs from it. My end goal at the moment is to become a trained sysadmin in a Windows and Linux environment. I'm currently working towards my MCSE Server 2012/2016 and then plan doing Linux after.

    I would like to know where to start as I haven't had a lot of experience in it yet. I've done a few Ubuntu and Fedora VMs at home on a graphical end, and spent a year working on Redhat v5 with a bit of AIX thrown in. I wasn't trained in Redhat, but the company who hired me decided to train me for the job so they didn't have to pay a full Linux-level salary. I got a fair bit of experience in it and even made myself a little command spreadsheet icon_rolleyes.gif.

    Would it be worth going straight for the RHCSA? I don't think I need to do the Linux+, as I want to use it at an industry level and go for the big stuff. If I need to create Linux workstations I can use the experience I got from the VMs.

    What would you guys recommend? I would like to hear how you guys started and what you used for training? I've seen sites like LinuxAcademy around which look useful. What would your advice be?

    Thanks in advance!

    RHCSA covers a lot of the basics so that would be good for you if you have some experience with RHEL already. If you want to go the free route then building your own lab using virtual box (http://www.brianlinkletter.com/how-to-use-virtualbox-to-emulate-a-network/) and reviewing Red Hat documentation is the way to go. If you have some money to spend you can go the Linux Academy route, which is nice because they allow you to quickly spin up and tear down servers.

    Once you're confident with all of the RHCSA objectives, it would be beneficial to move on the RHCE content and finally LPIC-2 content. This will build your skill set to the level of a competent Linux systems administrator.
  • Skyliinez92Skyliinez92 Level 99 Wizard Gielinor, UKPosts: 674Mod Mod
    Thanks for all the feedback guys. I think I'm going to skip the Linux+ and go straight for the RHCSA. I'm going to use the Linux Academy along with some resources you all mentioned. I'm also a physical learner so will most likely create a few VMs to practice with.

    @Verities - Is there a handy documentation for Redhat that I can use? I'll probably follow some Youtube videos if I get stuck but having a guide with me would be helpful. I want to make sure I'm learning the right things :). Also, is the RCHE harder than the CSA? And isn't the LPIC-2 part of the Linux+?
    Certs Achieved: CompTIA A+ | Net+ | Sec+, MTA NF (98-366), MTA OSF (98-349), MCTS: Win 7, MCP Win 10 (70-698)
    Currently Studying: MCSA: Windows Server 2016 ( 70-740 | 70-741 | 70-742 )

    "There are 10 types of people in this world; those who understand binary and those who don't." - Anon
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb They are watching you Posts: 3,122Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    https://www.amazon.com/RHCSA-RHCE-Cert-Guide-Certification/dp/0789754053/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492616872&sr=8-1&keywords=red+hat+rhcsa

    This book goes through step by step on how to do everything in Red Hat. Just skimmed a little bit, haven't actually done much with it so can't say a lot it about it personally.
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    Thanks for all the feedback guys. I think I'm going to skip the Linux+ and go straight for the RHCSA. I'm going to use the Linux Academy along with some resources you all mentioned. I'm also a physical learner so will most likely create a few VMs to practice with.

    @Verities - Is there a handy documentation for Redhat that I can use? I'll probably follow some Youtube videos if I get stuck but having a guide with me would be helpful. I want to make sure I'm learning the right things :). Also, is the RCHE harder than the CSA? And isn't the LPIC-2 part of the Linux+?

    Linux + is from CompTIA. LPIC-1/2/3 is from Linux Professional Institute. CompTIA and LPI have a current partnership for the Linux +/LPIC-1 combo; if you achieve one, you can automatically obtain the other.

    LPIC-1 is the base certification for LPI

    LPIC-2 is the intermediate certification for LPI

    LPIC-3 is the top certification for LPI

    I'm not sure what the CSA is but RHCE is a difficult exam because you have to configure a lot of things in 3.5 hours. It sounds like a lot of time until you're sitting in the exam and trying to complete all of the objectives. I haven't taken the LPIC-2 exam, but I've gone over the content for it and the objectives go much deeper than the RHCE.
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    https://www.amazon.com/RHCSA-RHCE-Cert-Guide-Certification/dp/0789754053/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1492616872&sr=8-1&keywords=red+hat+rhcsa

    This book goes through step by step on how to do everything in Red Hat. Just skimmed a little bit, haven't actually done much with it so can't say a lot it about it personally.

    Sander is a great author and instructor. I used only his RHEL 7 materials to pass my RHCSA 2 years ago, so I also recommend this book.
  • Skyliinez92Skyliinez92 Level 99 Wizard Gielinor, UKPosts: 674Mod Mod
    Verities wrote: »
    Linux + is from CompTIA. LPIC-1/2/3 is from Linux Professional Institute. CompTIA and LPI have a current partnership for the Linux +/LPIC-1 combo; if you achieve one, you can automatically obtain the other.

    LPIC-1 is the base certification for LPI

    LPIC-2 is the intermediate certification for LPI

    LPIC-3 is the top certification for LPI

    I'm not sure what the CSA is but RHCE is a difficult exam because you have to configure a lot of things in 3.5 hours. It sounds like a lot of time until you're sitting in the exam and trying to complete all of the objectives. I haven't taken the LPIC-2 exam, but I've gone over the content for it and the objectives go much deeper than the RHCE.

    Ah I understand, thanks. I meant the RHCSA but was trying to shorten it down :).

    Is it worth studying the latest version or Redhat? My obvious guess would be yes, but I used v5.5 at my previous job and I think v7 is out now? Is there much difference between each version?
    Certs Achieved: CompTIA A+ | Net+ | Sec+, MTA NF (98-366), MTA OSF (98-349), MCTS: Win 7, MCP Win 10 (70-698)
    Currently Studying: MCSA: Windows Server 2016 ( 70-740 | 70-741 | 70-742 )

    "There are 10 types of people in this world; those who understand binary and those who don't." - Anon
  • VeritiesVerities Posts: 1,162Member
    Ah I understand, thanks. I meant the RHCSA but was trying to shorten it down :).

    Is it worth studying the latest version or Redhat? My obvious guess would be yes, but I used v5.5 at my previous job and I think v7 is out now? Is there much difference between each version?

    The current versions of the RHCSA and RHCE are tested based on RHEL 7. Make sure you're using that version when studying and yes, RHEL 7 is much different than RHEL 5. When you begin your studies, you will notice the differences (mainly systemD).
  • BodanelBodanel Posts: 213Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I would say to skip everything else and just do RHCSA. Linux academy, Sander's book, Livelessons are good resources. Just choose one and do lots of labbing. NOthing will prepare you like a lab.
    If you manage to get RHCSA you will have a good foundation and you can learn everything else after that. It will be just a matter of time.
  • YuckTheFankeesYuckTheFankees Posts: 1,280Member
    If you dont mind paying for LA, I would definitely go that route since you can use their servers...and there are so many courses.
  • SlowhandSlowhand Questionably Benevolent Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,161Mod Mod
    One cool option you have, since you're already serving time in Microsoft-land, is to go for something like MCSA: Linux on Azure. If you have any interest in pursuing cloud-based training as well, you'd get your MCSE with the 70-533 exam after your 2012 journey, and another MCSA cert; all while getting some foundational Linux training in the process, which would set you up nicely for something like the RHCSA down the road. Just another option to toss out there.

    MCSA 2012/2016 >> MCSE (70-533) >> MCSA: Linux on Azure (LFCS) >> World Domination

    Free Microsoft Training: Microsoft Virtual Academy
    Free PowerShell Resources: Top 50 PowerShell Blogs
    Free DevOps/Azure Resources: Visual Studio Dev Essentials

    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
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