Another Linux+ n00b with questions

Legacy UserLegacy User Posts: 0Unregistered / Not Logged In ■□□□□□□□□□
I currently use ubuntu as my desktop operating system. Should this be sufficiant distro to use to study for Linux+, or should i really be getting redhat/fedora?

Realistically how long do most people have to study to safely pass this exam? I'm fairly new to linux (although i've been using ubuntu for a couple months, but i don't do too much with it).

I was thinking if i study\practice for two hours a day or so i'd probably be good within three to four weeks. Is this a reasonable estimate? I find if I set myself a deadline i seem to be much more dedecated, but i'd like it to be a reasonable one.

Comments

  • sprkymrksprkymrk Posts: 4,884Member
    Personally that wouldn't be enough time for me... But I am not a good studier (not sure if that's a real word). I have off/on been using Red Hat/Fedora since version 7.1 back in about the year 2000. I have also taken a few college level security classes that used Fedora as the main OS. I also run an online broadcast on a Fedora server using shoutcast. That said, however, I am not sure I could pass any kind of test on Linux with only 3-4 weeks of study. Do you plan on studying for several hours a day? How good are you at memorization? Do you have other computer experience? I think if I were going to take the Linux+ test I would study at the rate of 1 chapter every 2 days (I have a terrible memory and fall asleep within minutes of opening any kind of technical text book). Given a 15 chapter book, that would amount to about 1 month of study followed by a few practice exams, followed by reviewing my weak areas, etc. I think if I really hunkered down and put my nose to the grind stone I would allow myself a good 2 months.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • exkor5000exkor5000 Posts: 54Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    I never took the exam, but i took the practice exams and they were a piece of cake

    The best way to learn a linux based system is to start with the hardest. My advice is either Slackware, Gentoo, or Debian. You should stop using windows for a while, just so you get the sense of what is a linux system is like. You can read books until next year but until you dive into it you wont get anywhere.

    you can use linuxforum.com for technical questions and tutorials.

    I have started using Slackware 2.5-3 years ago. Today I feel very confortable with any distribution on a desktop or a server level. I personaly find distros like Fedora deeply disturbing because they try to emulate a windows enviroment which strives far away from the original idealogies of a linux system.
    Also it is much easier to troubleshoot via terminal then by graphics, also cheaper and eats less memory (stability).

    good luck
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Posts: 4,884Member
    exkor5000 wrote:
    I have started using Slackware 2.5-3 years ago. Today I feel very confortable with any distribution on a desktop or a server level. I personaly find distros like Fedora deeply disturbing because they try to emulate a windows enviroment which strives far away from the original idealogies of a linux system.
    I hear this a lot from people that consider themselves to be "hardcore" linux users. I'm not sure why that is. Yes, Red Hat/Fedora has a great GUI, but does not make them any less linux? Despite a great installer and GUI, I know (as do many others) that the CLI is where you get the job done. Having a great GUI is a bonus in my opinion, not a handicap.

    I would also ask what "original idealogies" you are referring to? I thought the idealogies revolved around "open source", "choice", and things like that. I am not sure where the "must have ugly, clunky interface and be hard for someone to use until he fights his way to acquire knowledge" ideal came from. An experienced linux user knows he can install RH/Fedora without a GUI at all if it is going to be used as a server. Meanwhile a new linux user has a good way to find his way around the OS until he gains experience.

    I hope this doesn't sound too defensive exkor5000, I don't mean it as a flame at all. Everyone has their favorite distro and I have no problem with that. I am just challenging what I see as a prevelant attitude among many linux users that seems to belittle new linux users for trying anything other than the "real linux" distros. While Red Hat/Frdora are the only linux flavors I use (excepting knoppix and other live distros), I also have decent experience with Solaris and Free BSD.
    exkor5000 wrote:
    The best way to learn a linux based system is to start with the hardest.
    Maybe. That is also sometimes the best way to keep people going back to Windows... If FreeBSD or Red Hat 5 had been my first experience with *nix, I am pretty sure I would have given up out of frustration. icon_wink.gif
    All things are possible, only believe.
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