Is Linux a good career choice?

coldbugcoldbug Posts: 189Registered Members
Last week, my co-worker told me that there are too many people in Microsoft and the bubble will burst soon. As a young man (i'm 39 ..not young tho lol), you should get into Linux.
I have been thinking about it since that day. I think he's right. Even though I want to get into MCSA after my Sec+, I am rethinking this now. Isn't that right that there will be 10 Microsoft guys and only 1 Linux guy in a company and he's making all the big bucks. More money comes with more responsibility too I know, but it's ok I like to carry the burdens.
The problem is I have to learn it from letter A..from scratch. I have no knowledge about Linux....absolutely zero.
Do you guys think it's worth it to spend time on Linux and ditch the MS?
Thanks
"If you want to kick the tiger in his ass, you'd better have a plan for dealing with his teeth."

Comments

  • TheFORCETheFORCE Posts: 2,224Registered Members
    Simply put, No. Linux is great but there will always be a need for Microsoft.
  • Skyliinez92Skyliinez92 Level 99 Wizard Posts: 665Registered Members ■■■■□□□□□□
    Get trained in both. I'm training to become a Sysadmin in both MS and Linux. It will make the job role more interesting and mean even more money.
    Certs Achieved: CompTIA A+ | Net+ | Sec+, MTA NF (98-366), MTA OSF (98-349), MCTS: Win 7, MCP Win 10 (70-698)
    Currently Studying: MCSA: Windows Server 2016 ( 70-740 | 70-741 | 70-742 )

    "There are 10 types of people in this world; those who understand binary and those who don't." - Anon
  • PC509PC509 Passion For IT Oregon, USPosts: 708Registered Members ■■■■□□□□□□
    Microsoft isn't going anywhere. However, knowing Linux is a great skill to have. From AWS to security to web development, there is always a need for Linux. At the very least, have a nice foundation of the OS. Be able to navigate, search, know the locations of various things, how files and devices work, etc.. It's just good stuff to know. Hell, if you want to go all in, go for it. Just know that Microsoft isn't a bubble that's going to pop. At least not anytime soon.

    Of course, 2018 may finally be the year of the Linux desktop (joking, as it's been the same claim for 20 years!).
  • techfiendtechfiend Posts: 1,481Registered Members
    Learn both, focus on the one you enjoy more, they are very different. He's right that there are typically fewer linux proper positions and they often pay a little more. I wouldn't let that sway you from enjoying windows if you prefer it.
    2018 AWS Solutions Architect - Associate (Apr) 2017 VCAP6-DCV Deploy (Oct) 2016 Storage+ (Jan)
    2015 Start WGU (Feb) Net+ (Feb) Sec+ (Mar) Project+ (Apr) Other WGU (Jun) CCENT (Jul) CCNA (Aug) CCNA Security (Aug) MCP 2012 (Sep) MCSA 2012 (Oct) Linux+ (Nov) Capstone/BS (Nov) VCP6-DCV (Dec) ITILF (Dec)
  • zodiarkzodiark Posts: 14Registered Members ■□□□□□□□□□
    Same dilemma as mine. 0 knowledge as well in Linux, but still leaning (coz i'm in the Linux thread icon_lol.gif). Seriously, I think I'll go with Linux, beginning is always the hardest, but it may really be worth it.
  • brownwrapbrownwrap Posts: 549Registered Members
    I started in Sun in 1988, after moving from VAX/VMS. I have made a living since then performing Linux admin duties. Most of my work these days is a subset. I install and configure scientific software that runs on Linux cluster and Cray HPCs. I install software like:

    NCAR Graphics

    GrADS Home Page

    https://www.unidata.ucar.edu/software/netcdf

    https://support.hdfgroup.org/HDF5

    All of the above is running on Linux machines. We have Windows machines, but they are only used to log into the Linux hosts.
  • chrisonechrisone Senior Member Posts: 1,766Registered Members ■■■■■■■■□□
    Is Linux a good career choice?


    Yes. Highly YES!

    Regarding the windows being in a bubble concept. Simply NO, just no, very much no, very highly NO! Don't let others put limits or talk you into putting limits on YOU. You can be very skillful in linux and windows, let other chumps put limits on themselves and devalue their career.
    2018 Goals: SANS Advanced Security Essentials - Enterprise Defender (complete, not going for cert), SpecterOps: Adversary Tactics Red Team OPS (complete), eCPPT (obtained), OSCP PWK (in progress), Demystifying Regular Expressions (in progress), SLAE, OSCE CTP
  • si20si20 Posts: 465Registered Members
    Linux is a great OS...well, OS's. Therein lies the problem. In my books, Linux is THE BEST OS. Better than Mac. Better than Windows -but the problem is that the OS has only recently became usable for non-techies. And even then they'll need to know about root and some CLI to get around.

    If you have Linux roles near you, then by all means, study the Linux+, the Red Hat certs etc Unfortunately for me, there is only one company near me who want a linux sys admin who has 5+ years experience. They've been advertising for 2 years now.... yeah - not gonna happen around me.

    The Linux+ was a great exam/course - really fun. I learned so much. But i've also forgotten so much. It's a true case of "use it or lose it". I've pretty much lost it because there are no linux jobs around me and my day-job uses Windows, like most companies out there.

    So it all depends on your personal goals and if there are any jobs around you e.g junior sys admin roles using Linux.
    Future certs: CEH v10 (maybe)
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Senior Member behind youPosts: 2,582Mod Mod
    Of course. HOWEVER, in addition, learn everything else.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • crimsonavengercrimsonavenger Posts: 27Registered Members ■□□□□□□□□□
    Microsoft will never "burst" in that aspect. Yes, the desktop support market is and has been saturated for years, its just becoming a cheaper market not necessarily going to pop, but on the flip side there will always be demand for enterprise level and small business support for the server side roles. As far a Linux, its a mixed bag. It does not necessarily equate to more pay from the initial investment, the supply of skilled individuals still outweighs the small demand of actual usage. But like others have already mentioned, it does help open up the door to more avenues of career movement. If you're looking for enterprise level support or a role in the cloud game, it is an excellent stepping stone. If that interests you I also recommend getting into virtualization. If you're going for a sysadmin role you're better off learning both and not tying one of your hands behind your back.
  • ThePawofRizzoThePawofRizzo Senior Member Posts: 379Registered Members ■■■□□□□□□□
    Where I work, we are mostly a Windows shop, but do have a couple Linux systems. Any knowledge of Linux will be helpful, and if you can get to the point you are very comfortable with either it could help you be a bit more competitive in the job market.

    Whoever told you the Microsoft bubble is going to "burst" must live closed off from the rest of the business world.
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