Query about CISSP/SSCP

BlueTeamRicBlueTeamRic Member Posts: 5 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello. I have a query about CISSP/SSCP that I'm hoping someone who has been in a similar situation may be able to help with.
Basically I would like to obtain CISSP qualification, but lack the 5 years required experience required to become certified.
I currently have 2 years experience in Security (8 years overall IT)
Is there any worth in becoming a CISSP Associate, or would it be better to take the SSCP certification?
I recently passed the CompTIA CSA+ exam, and hold the CEH cert as well. The CEH expires next Summer.
The thing is, most Security jobs require a CISSP certification. I rarely see SCCP as an accepted cert for Job requirements.
Or, would I be better off re-certifying for the CEH?
Thanks for any help.

Comments

  • SteveLavoieSteveLavoie Member Posts: 1,066 ■■■■■■■■■□
    First, depending on what you did in IT for 8 years, some of your more general IT experience could be applicable. Also, your SSCP help you in reducing the experience requirement by 1 year. So you need only 4. So, if you scrape hard your work experience and show it in its best aspect, you could be nearer from your goal.

    Also take into consideration that you will need time to study before writing the test. So you have 2 years, study for about 6-7 month, then you need another 1 year to be considered full CISSP, if your current work is in Security.




    https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP/Prerequisite-Pathway
  • shoeyshoey Member Posts: 111 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Skip the SSCP... If you feel confident you can study and pass the CISSP then you might as well not waste your time and get the CISSP Associate. I took the SSCP and then got my CISSP, and didn't find much of a benefit to taking the SSCP (imho). I'd rather of been a CISSP Associate instead of an SSCP eventually being followed by a CISSP.
    "I have missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I have lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I've been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I've failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed." - Michael Jordan
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Member Posts: 1,539 ■■■■■■□□□□
    You can’t call it CISSP Associate...it’s official title is Associate of ISC2...they are very clear about how you can word it.

    I don’t think SSCP adds much value to your resume. I wouldn’t let CEH expire...and passing a cert doesn’t automatically renew it, make sure you read how many credits...I believe it’s 40.

    What kind of budget are you dealing with? Taking the CISSP is an ok option but it depends...are you wanting a new job soon? Are you in an area that has SANS events? The work study program is great and only a little more expensive...plus you could claim it for CEH.
  • shoeyshoey Member Posts: 111 ■■■□□□□□□□
    TechGuru80 wrote: »
    You can’t call it CISSP Associate...

    Yeah, I should of said something about that instead of just continuing on using it. I am a bit confused though, because after I got my SSCP I was an associate of (isc)2 as well...
    "I have missed more than 9,000 shots in my career. I have lost almost 300 games. 26 times, I've been trusted to take the game winning shot and missed. I've failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed." - Michael Jordan
  • TechGuru80TechGuru80 Member Posts: 1,539 ■■■■■■□□□□
    It’s basically the title you get when you don’t have the experience to qualify...you can also get it for CAP...basically everything but CISSP concentrations.

    The weird thing I noticed was for my digital badge on acclaim it says something to the effect of passing the CISSP but not having the experience. Either way nobody was like oh Associate of ISC2 that’s great...it just made my life easier not having to take the exam later on...more of a personal choice than anything.
  • laurieHlaurieH Member Posts: 109 ■■■□□□□□□□
    First, depending on what you did in IT for 8 years, some of your more general IT experience could be applicable. Also, your SSCP help you in reducing the experience requirement by 1 year. So you need only 4. So, if you scrape hard your work experience and show it in its best aspect, you could be nearer from your goal.

    Also take into consideration that you will need time to study before writing the test. So you have 2 years, study for about 6-7 month, then you need another 1 year to be considered full CISSP, if your current work is in Security.




    https://www.isc2.org/Certifications/CISSP/Prerequisite-Pathway

    What he said - most likely you will have sufficient experience in what you've done to satisfy the experience requirement. Review the domains carefully and see what work you may have done that matches at least two of the domains. You might surprise yourself...
    CCNA - expired
    CISSP - live n' kickin'
    My CISSP study apps
    My CISSP study advice blog
  • SteveLavoieSteveLavoie Member Posts: 1,066 ■■■■■■■■■□
    sorry, I wasn't very clear. You resumed what I had in mind. Also, I wanted to let him know that he had to take into account the time between now and his exam.
  • breelizbreeliz Registered Users Posts: 3 ■□□□□□□□□□
    You need 5 years cumulative work experience in 2 or more of the domains. You may have been doing something in IT that wasn't titled "Security" but you may have performed job functions that constitute work in one or more of the domains. You may very well have more than the required amount of experience. Read the domain descriptions and compare them to your job functions.

    More importantly, read the requirements more carefully. You misinterpreted them. If you do this with the test questions you will have problems.

    Good luck!
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