Terrible timing with being laid off

tester4employmenttester4employment Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Yes, I guess there is no good time, but I would prefer this happened after I took the CISSP. All the employment opportunities I have found either require or desire a candidate who is a CISSP. Should I include on my resume that I am taking the exam mid-April, so I am not immediately eliminated by HR representative? Or is there a better option?


Thanks for your time.

Comments

  • TechGromitTechGromit Completely Clueless Ontario, NY Posts: 1,818Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    I wouldn't what if you fail your exam? You can't "almost" have a certification you either have it or you don't.
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • tester4employmenttester4employment Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    That was exactly my concern. I guess I can mention that I am currently pursuing the CISSP.
  • iBrokeITiBrokeIT Posts: 1,151Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Your resume should be reserved for your accomplishments. Your cover letter would be the place for your aspirations (such as CISSP) and why you are good fit for the position.
  • GirlyGirlGirlyGirl Posts: 219Member
    Yes, I guess there is no good time, but I would prefer this happened after I took the CISSP. All the employment opportunities I have found either require or desire a candidate who is a CISSP. Should I include on my resume that I am taking the exam mid-April, so I am not immediately eliminated by HR representative? Or is there a better option?


    Thanks for your time.

    I thought about adding a GIAC certification to my resume a couple days ago. I have not taken the exam yet but it's scheduled. Then I thought, what if I fail. Well, I won't fail but it crossed my mind for a second. Then I thought to myself, how would my resume look to the hiring manager/cyber security folks, like minded people. Then I opted against it. I figured I would laugh if I seen it on a resume so I wouldn't want to put it on my resume. But, I did consider it.

    I personally dislike seeing people list certifications that have not been passed. I kind of dislike seeing education listed that hasn't been completed. I am borderline with the education part. What if you take off a semester? What if a family emergency comes up? What if financial aid isn't approved? That estimated graduation date could change. I have repeated my fair share of college courses to know. Long story short, if it isn't passed I would not add it.

    The laid off part:

    I personally like to have three things. IF (that's a big IF) I absolutely can't have these three things I must have one. They are from top to bottom not bottom to top.

    1. Money in the bank-Best solution
    2. A good 10-20k credit limit credit card- Maxing out a credit card will drop your credit score and increase your dept to income...which will drop your credit score. But you can bounce back if you have some money in the bank to pay the minimal until you get on your feet. THEN you pay it off with lump sums.
    3. An IRA I can pull out of for the absolutely worst case- you will take a loss. Come IRS time you will take a loss. It will help short term and hurt long term come time to file taxes. Individual results may vary.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Senior Member behind youPosts: 2,587Mod Mod
    Don't put that on your resume. Put that in your cover letter or mention during an interview that you are in persuit. No, there I never a good time....
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • ThePawofRizzoThePawofRizzo Senior Member Posts: 381Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Our IT Security Manager recently hired a new analyst that had a couple foundational certs, including Security+. The new hire did mention on his resume that he was "pursuing the CISSP" which always makes me wince.....but the manager interview and hired him. That being said, I agree with GirlyGirl, if you don't have it, I wouldn't put it down on the resume. However, a mention on the cover letter, as stated IBrokeIT, I think is reasonable. Ultimately, a potential employer gets some idea you are working toward it.

    The problem I have with "I'm working on it" mentions on a resume, is that historically way more often than not when interviewed, or hired (never by me), when I've seen applicants that were "working on school" or "working on a cert", the "accomplishment" mostly never transpired. In fact, in a couple interviews when asked about how close they were in finishing their education, the applicants would begin the back-pedaling that they were on a "break", and then when pressed that the "break" was a couple years long so far....and mostly there was never a solid justification as to why they were on a "break" in the first place, let alone for years.
  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Posts: 868Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    GirlyGirl wrote: »
    The laid off part:

    I personally like to have three things. IF (that's a big IF) I absolutely can't have these three things I must have one. They are from top to bottom not bottom to top.

    1. Money in the bank-Best solution
    2. A good 10-20k credit limit credit card- Maxing out a credit card will drop your credit score and increase your dept to income...which will drop your credit score. But you can bounce back if you have some money in the bank to pay the minimal until you get on your feet. THEN you pay it off with lump sums.
    3. An IRA I can pull out of for the absolutely worst case- you will take a loss. Come IRS time you will take a loss. It will help short term and hurt long term come time to file taxes. Individual results may vary.

    This is all good advice. I speak from experience, having been laid off more than once.

    Re: credit card debt, way back when during an extended bout with unemployment, I was able to get some of my creditors to settle for a much smaller lump some. Another one dropped my interest altogether and agreed to let me pay $50 per month until it was paid off. Many of them will gladly work with you rather than let you blow off debt. These tactics also keep those black marks off your credit score.

    By the way, I'm working on becoming a millionaire...
  • ansionnachclisteansionnachcliste Posts: 55Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    The best advice is contained within this thread, so far.

    Put it on a cover letter.

    Best of luck with the job hunt and CISSP.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,596Mod Mod
    One thing, if you put it anywhere when you apply you better be ready to speak to the CBK. As a hiring manager if I see "$Cert expected by $Date" I will make sure you are not BS'ing me. I've seen this go south for way too many people through my career. As long as you can speak to the topics it's cool in my book.
  • SquishedSquished Posts: 191Member
    Sorry to hear this. Never a good time to get laid off but be glad it was after the holiday season. There is always greener grass on the other side.
    [2018] - A+ 901 (PASS), A+ 902 (PASS), Project+ (PASS), Security+ (PASS), Network+(PASS), CySA, Cloud+
    [2018] - MBA - IT Management - WGU (PASS)

    HR: “What if we train them and they leave?”
    ME: “What if we don’t train them and they stay?”
  • tester4employmenttester4employment Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for all the excellent advice. I will go with the cover letter statement. And try to stay above water financially in this process.
  • tester4employmenttester4employment Posts: 5Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Hi,

    Just to follow-up in this: I did end up finding a job and I just passed the exam for the CISSP. I won't have that problem again. Thanks again for all of your assistance.
  • smcmahan309smcmahan309 Posts: 4Registered Users ■□□□□□□□□□
    Congratulations on both counts! It's always good to hear a happy ending.
  • DZA_DZA_ Untitled. Posts: 234Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Miracles happened, congratulations on both fronts! I'm glad it worked out.
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