What are the skills that will ACTUALLY help me in the IT business world?

jacky6jacky6 Posts: 8Member ■■□□□□□□□□
Hi,

As a security graduate, I have studied various ideas in security in my curriculum. For example, using IBM AppScan to test for security vulnerabilities.
Using IBM QRadar to collects log data, its network devices, host assets and operating systems, applications, vulnerabilities, user activities and behavior, and etc. As well as, SQL language, programming, penetrating testing, networks using Cisco packet tracer ,etc.

These are some of the examples that I have studied in the past years apart from other things as well.

I am currently looking to self-develop and self-improve my skills in IT using books, online materials, and other methods.

My question might be confusing but, all I need to under is what skills will I actually need in the business world in the IT department in order to be more efficient, responsible, impressive and relied on? Will having more programming skills help me? Or will I need to learn more about databases, user directories, how networks work in an organization? What can I focus on to be specific?

It might be frustrating to answer this question but I am hoping to get a job and I want to educate myself more than what I studies, I appreciate your input and experience-filled comments.

Comments

  • JDMurrayJDMurray Certification Invigilator Surf City, USAPosts: 11,089Admin Admin
    Microsoft Excel is the #1 business application on Earth. Those who know how to use it well truly excel above their teammates.
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Posts: 6,642Mod Mod
    I see what you did there. EXCELlent!
  • kriscamaro68kriscamaro68 Senior Member Posts: 1,186Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    The most important skills in my opinion are the following:
    People skills-Learn how to interact with people in a rational and friendly manner. A lot of I.T. people are anti-social and can't have a conversation beyond primitive grunting.

    Learn scripting\automation in your respective area. If your a Windows guy learn Powershell and Python. If you a *nix guy learn Bash and Python. Learn about Rest API's.
  • scaredoftestsscaredoftests Senior Member behind youPosts: 2,603Mod Mod
    people skills..people skills..
    good troubleshooting skills
    a thirst for knowledge
    willing to think outside the box.
    Never let your fear decide your fate....
  • EANxEANx Posts: 944Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    IT people are well-known for several business-skills deficiencies. The top two, IMO, being a lack of people skills and a lack of communications skills. Learn how to communicate complex topics in simple ways, learn how to stand up in front of other people and learn how to make other people comfortable around you as well as determine when they want to get away. Business is all about getting people to give you money and people are far more willing to do that when they like you.
    2018: CCIE Written (R/S) (done - Jan), CCIE R/S
    After that: MBA, OSCP
  • beadsbeads Posts: 1,403Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Learn how to troubleshoot, repair and install friggin' software. Nothing annoys me more than "security" graduates who haven't the most basic of administrative skills but expose nothing but opinion or tool use.

    - b/eads
  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Posts: 881Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    +1 on the communication skills. Take some technical writing/business writing courses including grammar. A lack of communication skills makes even the smartest person seem less than brilliant.
  • McxRisleyMcxRisley Eye of Barad-dûr Posts: 436Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    #1 Don't suck at your job
    #2 have the initiative to improve your skillset

    Do those 2 things and you will beat out over half of the talent pool because complacency is very real in this industry.
    I'm not allowed to say what my previous occupation was, but let's just say it rhymes with architect.
  • jacky6jacky6 Posts: 8Member ■■□□□□□□□□
    Thank you all, you were all extremely helpful.
  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Posts: 535Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Learn how to turn technology, systems, and platforms into business solutions for the company. The business types are rarely interested in flashy latest technologies or impressed with in depth knowledge of the products unless you can demonstrate how this helps their business with their products. At the end of the day, the whole purpose of technology is for employees who produce products for the company to be able to do it cheaper or faster or more efficiently, to provide solutions to businesses.
  • NetworkNewbNetworkNewb They are watching you Posts: 3,133Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    McxRisley wrote: »
    #1 Don't suck at your job
    #2 have the initiative to improve your skillset

    Do those 2 things and you will beat out over half of the talent pool because complacency is very real in this industry.

    This. And definitely over half! Like 75% have little motive to actually put in extra work and keep on improving. Not saying those people don't work hard, but actually spend time to improve yourself on your own time... Small percentage from my experience.
  • scadascada Posts: 48Member ■■□□□□□□□□


    True,





    People just stop learning and wonder why they never move up. Some people at work think I am nuts for starting a second masters and going over CISM. The not sucking at your job is key. Know what you don’t know, ask for help and put the work in when it is needed.
  • ErtazErtaz Posts: 878Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    JDMurray wrote: »
    Microsoft Excel is the #1 business application on Earth. Those who know how to use it well truly excel above their teammates.

    Truth. When you have 64 bit Excel, the world is your pivot table...


    Someone once stole an office license from me. I will find them. They have my Word.
  • labscloudlabscloud Posts: 136Member
    scada wrote: »


    True,





    People just stop learning and wonder why they never move up. Some people at work think I am nuts for starting a second masters and going over CISM. The not sucking at your job is key. Know what you don’t know, ask for help and put the work in when it is needed.

    Telling someone you don't know the answer is invaluable advice in IT. You look much smarter by admitting you don't know something, as opposed to spewing a word salad response. Keep skilling-up and you will see results. Get certs in whatever specialty you end up in, they will help you stand out at your job and during the interview process. You already have some experience with some security tools so read as much as you can to refine your knowledge on them.
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Posts: 3,867Mod Mod
    People skill. Know how to get along with people, learn to be friendly but firm, have hobbies, be outgoing.
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
  • N7ValiantN7Valiant Posts: 300Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    People skills.
  • DatabaseHeadDatabaseHead Posts: 2,333Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    Organization, handling stress, ability to learn quickly, ability to retain information, treating people with respect, managing upward, understanding the business you're in, at least the vertical.

    Those are some for starters.....
  • jwdk19jwdk19 Posts: 55Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    Learn the business process workflow. When I worked in health IT I made it a point to understand the patient flow(check-in process, basic overview of ICD codes, CPT codes etc.)

    This way I could help the clinic/hospital by having a better understanding of what the Doctors, Nurses meant when they said blah blah when I was entering the CPT code blah blah blah). It also helped me to gage the priority of a request/issue.

    Current example (pork processing facility) I pick the brains of production managers in order to understand the impact of how a network outage etc etc affects xyz department and how if abc automated line is down the company loses money by paying employees overtime (because they are manually processing the product) until we can get that system online .

    It is absolutely instrumental IMO, to learn and have at least an above basic overview of the business and how you fit into the "machine" in order to fully be effective at creating IT/Security solutions.
  • shochanshochan Techno Dancer ARPosts: 761Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Really the only way you learn soft skills/people skills is working in the hospitality business BEFORE you get into IT. I worked in restaurant biz for 10yrs kissing @$$ to earn a little more than my $2.13hr wage...hehe, but I have to say, it helped my communication skills to be able to explain to users "without talking over their heads"...I am not saying go rush out & work at your fave restaurant or hotel bar, but it will help you get over the fears of actually speaking to people instead of being "Melton" with your red stapler in the basement of your mom's home.
    2019 goals -> CEH (Feb), RHCSA (Dec)


    "It's not good when it's done, it's done when it's good" ~ Danny Carey
  • UnixGuyUnixGuy Are we having fun yet? Posts: 3,867Mod Mod
    @shochan: agreed working on hospitality is a great way to get those skills, but not the only way. Something as simple as joining a sports team and socialising can make a huge difference
    Goal: MBA, March 2020
  • AvgITGeekAvgITGeek Senior Member Posts: 227Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    people skills..people skills..
    good troubleshooting skills
    a thirst for knowledge
    willing to think outside the box.

    Jumping anacondas! THIS RIGHT HERE!
    We've gone through a couple interns/recent grads because they don't have what scaredoftests is talking about. Great, you have a degree but you are completely worthless when tasks are thrown at you.
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