Very lost on this resume with IT

diablo911diablo911 nonePosts: 34Member ■■■□□□□□□□

 Im not sure what do add, this is all i could think of, the bad thing about this is the few things i have listed that i have taken over the past few years i havnt touched it since and have already forgotten how to set up a dhcp or dns server,  if thrown into a company i would be sure where to start, but having forgotten it is more bothersome. Having gone through and almost at the end up a 4 year degree this is all i can think of. With the c++ im not very good with it, i can right something like please enter a number that goes to a variable and then i can output that variable, i know.

Education

 

The University of Southern Mississippi                                                                                          Hattiesburg, MS

Bachelor of Science in Computer Networking                                                                                  Current

 

Jones County Junior College                                                                                                                    Ellisville, MS

AAS in Computer Networking                                                                                                               August 2017

 

 

 

Relevant course work

. Cisco routing and switching

Four semesters in routing and switching, currently studying for CCNA.

 

              

 

Special Projects

. Linux server

Created a ticketing system through word press.

 

. Windows server

Worked with group policy, created DNS and DHCP servers, some work in IIS.

 

 

 

Programming languages

. C++

Two semesters in working with C++.

 

. Python

Currently self-studying, awaiting official class.  

 

 

Experience

U.S Army

Diesel mechanic

                             · Maintained fleet vehicles and equipment.

                             · Troubleshooting faulty devices and replacing major components.

 

Quick reaction force

                             · Protecting and moving UN officials between different locations in armored convoys.






Comments

  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+; CCNA R&S; CCNP R&S Posts: 881Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    What type of IT job are you looking for?  It's hard to give you advice without knowing what type of job you are targeting.
  • diablo911diablo911 none Posts: 34Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    @thomas_ honestly i have no idea. My major is in computer networking for this BS degree at southern ms. I figured that aims for network admin jobs, but most people i know that graduate do things completely different, obtaining the degree is just a formality for them needed to secure there current position. As for the instructors, i see some that are sys admins which obtained computer science degrees and self studied and have been working with linux over that past 15 years, but these guys dont know cisco. Then i meet guys that stop at the AAS degree and just got lucky studying and doing cisco work. Originally i thought a networker was supposed to know all about system administration and have cisco certs ex ex, seems like way to much to know, but  from the classes iv taken, and the programmers iv talked to, they said just learn as much as you can about linux,python and cisco if you want. The job titles are confusing, network engineer, system admin, system tech, network tech ex ex. In short i have no idea, iv never been this confused about anything before job wise, so many different companies that have so many different needs and all want different certs. Ya im not picky and would honestly take the first job that was offered, cisco isnt really fun, nor is linux or python, just a job, need money to stay alive.  
  • LonerVampLonerVamp OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, CCNA Cyber Ops, Sec+ Posts: 329Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    The job titles don't really matter so much as the job descriptions for each. I'm not what I consider to be a "network admin/analyst" but I was a "network analyst for 7 years. We just all had the same title, and I did sysadmin work in Windows during that time. When searching for jobs, keep all of those titles open and looked into. Look at the requirements and duties, and start deciding what you'd like to do or look into and learn.

    Also, coming out of college, you honestly aren't expected to have deep experience with day-to-day things, if that makes sense.

    Security Engineer/Analyst/Geek, Red & Blue Teams
    OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, CCNA Cyber Ops, Sec+, Linux+, AWS CCP
    2019 goals: GWAPT, Linux+, (possible: SLAE, CCSK, AWS SA-A)
  • MrNetTekMrNetTek 41 certificate exams, 51 training certificates, and a bachelor's and master’s degree. Posts: 87Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited July 31
    Three things I recommend:

    #1 Use a professional resume making service. 
    --- you want the very best resume to market yourself.

    #2 Network with your local job recruiters. Get advice from them.
    --- let recruiters do all the heavy lifting for you.

    #3 Comb through [entry-level] computer networking jobs, and review the job descriptions with great detail.
    --- get a feel for what's out there, and what employers are expecting. 


    To be successful, you need to cultivate your talents. Use all the online and offline resources at your disposal to figure things out.


    -MrNetTek at your service-
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  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+; CCNA R&S; CCNP R&S Posts: 881Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    If you're not picky on the type of job, then I would start look at the job postings and find the ones that catch your eye.  If you see a trend in what those job postings are asking for, then try to come up with bullet points from your experience, education, and home lab/studies that target the wish list of bullet points from the job posting.  However, don't worry about satisfying each and every bullet point on the job listing. Also, you may want to come up with different resumes that target different job roles.  For example, you may want to have one resume for help desk roles, another for sysadmin roles, and another for networking roles.

    As LonerVamp mentioned, job titles are kind of a toss up.  However, usually "Tech" positions are lower than "Engineer" positions.  I would recommend not following the titles too closely as they can mean completely different things depending on the company.

    Finally, if you haven't seen this thread, then I would recommend taking a look at it:

    https://community.infosecinstitute.com/discussion/113891/resume-writing-resources#latest
  • Muhammed HMuhammed H Posts: 93Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    @MrNetTek ;
    #1 Use a professional resume making service. // Can you name a good resume making service ?
  • MrNetTekMrNetTek 41 certificate exams, 51 training certificates, and a bachelor's and master’s degree. Posts: 87Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited July 31
    @Muhammed H

    https://www.resumewritinggroup.com/


    -MrNetTek at your service-
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  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Posts: 1,353Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    edited July 17
    diablo911 said:

    . Having gone through and almost at the end up a 4 year degree 


    DON'T use a professional resume service!  Save your money!  Sounds like you went to school, and you're almost finished.  Your school should have a career services department that can help you write, format, and tailor  your resume.  Reach out to them first, and see what happens.   
    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • Infosec_SamInfosec_Sam Security+, CCENT, ITIL Foundation, A+ Madison, WIPosts: 299Admin Admin
    DON'T use a professional resume service!  Save your money!  Sounds like you went to school, and you're almost finished.  Your school should have a career services department that can help you write, format, and tailor  your resume.  Reach out to them first, and see what happens.   
    I agree with this! I drafted up my resume to 90%, and then I approached an IT recruiter who gave me tips on how to polish it up. It's in the recruiter's best interest to make you look like an attractive candidate, so it's always an option to ask for some advice from them. It'll at least get an experienced set of eyes on it without the added cost of a professional service.
    Community Manager at Infosec!
    Who we are | What we do
  • Johnhe0414Johnhe0414 A+, Network+, Security+, Project+ USA, CAPosts: 105Registered Users ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited July 17
    MrNetTek said:

    #3 Comb through [entry-level] computer networking jobs, and review the job descriptions with great detail.
    --- get a feel for what's out there, and what employers are expecting. 


    Once you have your resume completed --- I would do this.

    Current:  A+ | Network+ | Project+ |Security+
    Working on: Cysa+
  • MrNetTekMrNetTek 41 certificate exams, 51 training certificates, and a bachelor's and master’s degree. Posts: 87Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited July 31
    @diablo911

    Entry-level people seldom have the skills to craft a competitive resume. A poorly written resume goes straight to the trash. My advice is....don't take chances---stack the deck in your favor.

    Sure, if you can find someone to help you write up a great resume, then do that. If not, pay someone. Even looking over your resume from above, there are misspelled words (example, word press should be WordPress), there are consistency issues with labels, and the general layout isn't very modern. 

    Read this: http://razorresume.com/professional-resume-writers/

    and...this: https://www.quora.com/Is-a-resume-writing-service-worth-it


    -MrNetTek at your service-
    LinkedIn  Tumblr  Facebook  Twitter  Instagram  Mix  My Blog



  • PantherPanther Posts: 114Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    OP can also go to their local unemployment center, who can help with such things for free.
  • yoba222yoba222 Posts: 980Member ■■■■■■□□□□
    I agree with MrNetTek on this one. If you happen have expert writing skills, yes you can probably save money and produce a resume that is better than what the professional services would create. But diablo911 isn't at expert writing level yet, and getting a professional version would make a big difference.
    Obtained: A+ | Network+ | Security+ | CySA+ | PenTest+ | CAPM | eJPT | CCNA R&S | CCNA CyberOps | GCIH | LFCS
    2019: Virtual Hacking Labs then OSCP
  • diablo911diablo911 none Posts: 34Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    @yoba222 , spent 3,000 plus on writing classes going to this college place, shouldnt i be an expert, just messing. I know how to write a resume for diesel mechanics which landed me a federal technician job cause i was taught skills, the problem is just that the university hasn't taught me any skills so i have trouble writing down stuff, i dont want to write things like setting up a DHCP server when that class was taken over 2 years ago and i completely forgot ex ex.
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Posts: 1,732Member ■■■■■■■□□□
    the problem is just that the university hasn't taught me any skills so i have trouble writing down stuff, i dont want to write things like setting up a DHCP server when that class was taken over 2 years ago and i completely forgot ex ex.
    This is a common feeling for new graduates. Your employers will understand that the college did not teach you how to do your job. Successful students will have be exposed to the concepts required to do the new job.
  • AvgITGeekAvgITGeek 70-410, 70-411 Posts: 337Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    edited July 20
    When is the last time you configured DHCP? If you say two years ago this is all about you and motivation or lack thereof.
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