quick Rant!!!!

ITrascalITrascal Member Posts: 55 ■■■□□□□□□□
it just really grinds the gears to see a 5 day course for $3400.  Seen a  Redhat on their site. Im thinking to myself REALLY? Ok im done

ps have any of you all paid this kinda money for a couple of days?

Comments

  • kaijukaiju Member Posts: 420 ■■■■■■□□□□
    These course are meant to be preps for the exam. If you went in with little to no knowledge then it was a waste of money (especially if it was out of pocket).
    Work smarter NOT harder! Semper Gumby!
  • shochanshochan Member Posts: 931 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I think the pricing is structured for businesses instead of individuals.


    2020 Goal ~ Linux+
  • mikey88mikey88 CISSP, CySA+, Security+, Network+ and others Member Posts: 493 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I could see people paying that much for something like CCIE prep with good instructors. I cringe however when someone spends thousands on a CompTIA boot camp. 
    Certs: CISSP, CySA+, Security+, Network+ and others | 2019 Goals: Cloud Sec/Scripting/Linux

  • E Double UE Double U Member Posts: 1,694 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Over $6500 for a 5/6 day SANS course, but doesn't bother me since my employer pays.
    Alphabet soup: CISSP, CCSP, CISM, CISA, GDSA, GPEN, GCIA, GCIH, GCCC, CEH, Azure Fundamentals, etc

    2020 goals: AZ-900, AZ-500, GDSA, ITILv4

    "You tried your best and you failed miserably. The lesson is, never try." - Homer Simpson
  • tedjamestedjames Scruffy-looking nerfherdr Member Posts: 1,156 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Over $6500 for a 5/6 day SANS course, but doesn't bother me since my employer pays.
    Mine won't pay for something like that. However, if you volunteer to work at a SANS training event, I think you can get the training for something like $1800.
  • ITrascalITrascal Member Posts: 55 ■■■□□□□□□□
    im logically thinking LOL what in that 5-6 day course is worth that much money tho. This kind of info better help someone pass 20 future courses
  • Swift6Swift6 RHCE, RHCSA, LPIC-2, LPIC-1, SCA, Linux+, Network+, CWTS ScotlandMember Posts: 268 ■■■■□□□□□□
    shochan said:
    I think the pricing is structured for businesses instead of individuals.
    You will find many students attending these courses are usually covered by their employer or contractors and self-employed paying for themselves.
  • Infosec_SamInfosec_Sam Security+, CCENT, ITIL Foundation, A+ Madison, WIAdmin Posts: 508 Admin
    edited July 2019
    I'm currently sitting in a boot camp from Infosec, and many of my classmates are in government positions that require a security clearance. From what I can tell, it doesn't look like many of the individuals are paying their own way through the class.

    I should mention that a boot camp is far from mandatory to pass a certification exam. I've heard it likened to flying first class vs economy in an airplane. They both get you to the same place, but you're going to have a much better/easier time in first class. You just have to decide whether or not the better experience is worth the higher price.
    Community Manager at Infosec!
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  • 10Linefigure10Linefigure CCNP R&S, Security+ USAMember Posts: 368 ■■■□□□□□□□
    @Infosec_Sam I see you sliding that advertising in there. 
    CCNP R&S, Security+
    B.S. Geography - Business Minor
    MicroMasters - CyberSecurity
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  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec, CISSP, SSCP, GSEC, EnCE, C|EH, CySA+, PenTest+, CASP+, Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 11,720 Admin
    Pricing is based on the target market for the product. If the target market is businesses rather than individuals then the prices for the products will be higher because businesses can typically afford to pay more. The individual consumer is rarely the target customer for professional business services, such as vendor-supplied training.
  • lucky0977lucky0977 Senior Member Member Posts: 218 ■■■■□□□□□□
    My company paid for 5 day boot camps for CISSP and CISM and while not in the price range of SANS courses, they are still ridiculously priced. In my view, it was an instructor reading the book to you and a lot of side-bar conversations pertaining to real world experience.
    Bachelor of Science: Computer Science | Hawaii Pacific University
    CISSP | CISM | CISA | CASP | SSCP | Sec+ | Net+ | A+
  • LonerVampLonerVamp OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, AWS SA-A, AWS Security, Sec+, Linux+, CCNA Cyber Ops, CCSK Member Posts: 507 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Have I paid that kind of money? No.

    Would I? That depends. (See below.)

    Have I known others to? Yes. For them, it's about what they get out of the deal, both learning and monetary return on investment. Do the certs open doors to new job opportunities or high pay rates? If so, dropping $5000 now for a larger raise in the near future (above and beyond what you'd get if you had instead invested that $5000) certainly makes long term sense for some. Just make sure you're ready to pursue that upward movement as a self-starter. Dropping that money to stay in your current gig and make what is likely a nominal raise you'd have gotten anyway means all you're getting is the knowledge for your own intangible personal gain. That's fine, but it sure is nice to recoup (and more) the investment.

    Security Engineer/Analyst/Geek, Red & Blue Teams
    OSCP, GCFA, GWAPT, CISSP, OSWP, AWS SA-A, AWS Security, Sec+, Linux+, CCNA Cyber Ops, CCSK
    2020 goals: AWS Security Specialty, maybe AWAE or SLAE, CISSP-ISSAP?
  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+ CCNA R&S CCNP R&S/Enterprise/Collab Member Posts: 946 ■■■■■■■□□□
    Not for IT stuff.  I have an aversion to sitting in a classroom listening to someone reading off of a Powerpoint presentation.  For the  entry- and mid-level I find it to be a waste because for the amount they charge for the course I could self-study, fail the exams a few times, and it would still be cheaper than taking one of these courses.  If I ever go for the CCIE I might consider it, but even then I'll probably end up just taking self-studying for it.
  • DFTK13DFTK13 Member Posts: 172 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Just me, unless my company is paying for it, I would never go through a mini course or boot camp for the thousands they charge. Especially if I had zero knowledge in the field. I do so much better when I self-study, I can actually absorb the knowledge better instead of being fed through a firehose. 
    Certs: CCNA(200-301), Network+, A+, LPI Linux Essentials
    Goals: CCNP Enterprise(ENCOR + ENARSI), AWS CSA - Associate, Azure AZ-104, Become better at python, learn docker and kubernetes

    Degree: A.S. Network Administration
    Pursuing: B.S. in I.T. Web and Mobile Development Concentration
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 1,995 ■■■■■■■■□□
    ITrascal said:
    it just really grinds the gears to see a 5 day course for $3400.  Seen a  Redhat on their site. Im thinking to myself REALLY? Ok im done

    ps have any of you all paid this kinda money for a couple of days?

    Educations costs, usually it's possible just to get some books, read and study them, and pass an exam. Someone is always willing to teach you for a modest fee, something you can do yourself for next to nothing. Global Knowledge has a four day A+ and Network+ certification course for $3,395 each. That's $6,790 for both, I picked up two ExamCram books, read them and studied for two weeks and passed both exams, and got a $3,000 raise at work having those certifications. You just need a little motivation. My employer told us if you have any of these certifications by next month, we will give you more money. A lot of my co-workers were jealous, they were made the same offer, but did nothing about it. Rarely do certifications have such a direct cause and effect, usually it's get this certification and someday it might help you get another higher paying job, maybe....              
    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
  • TechGromitTechGromit GSEC, GCIH, GREM, Ontario, NY Member Posts: 1,995 ■■■■■■■■□□
    LonerVamp said:
    Have I paid that kind of money? No.

    Would I? That depends. (See below.)

    Have I known others to? Yes. For them, it's about what they get out of the deal, both learning and monetary return on investment. T
    The most I've parted with personally for education was $400 for an extension for the GREM certification attempt, not counting the certification renewal I recently paid for. While my employer has generously paid for three SANS courses, travel expenses and reimbursed me for passing those certification attempts, they are no longer paying for any more SANS courses, except a few very restrictive cases. For example they will pay a SANS 401 course for a new employee, but not the certification attempt. My GREM will expire in January, 2022. So I can either try to cobble together 36 CPE's from different sources or take another SANS course, which I will have to most likely have to pay for out of pocket, even with a work study, it's $1,800 + travel expenses.       


    Still searching for the corner in a round room.
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