Deskside support vs MSP support

AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
So I'm deciding between two offers one is more of a desk job, handling tickets working with different companies and environments to resolve tickets remotely. Mid size IT company direct hire with some benefits average pay but they said their willing to pay more after proving yourself. The other is through an agency but working directly with the IT group of a huge company, a bank, doing deskside support, with more moving and grunt work and tickets as they come and understanding the environment. Potential hire on with the company itself, but initially a littttleee better pay with no benefits. Seems i could learn more with the IT company but maybe not? The bank seems to have a team their that I also could learn from potentially. Advice? 

Comments

  • Cuse0311Cuse0311 Member Posts: 52 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Eh that's a tough one. Kind of depends on several factors. Are you single, your age, etc...Working without benefits can be beneficial in the short term, but what's your long term goal?
  • TheFORCETheFORCE Senior Member Member Posts: 2,297 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Go with the bank offer. Potentially better options and upside as well as looking better on the resume. 
  • AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Single early 30s I want to just learn develop and put a little cash in my pocket
  • Cuse0311Cuse0311 Member Posts: 52 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I agree with @TheFORCE. I would go with the bank offer, especially knowing the information you just provided.
  • yoba222yoba222 Senior Member Member Posts: 1,094 ■■■■■■■■□□
    If your looking to build experience for early IT career, I'd avoid the remote work and go for the hands-on offer, despite the no-benefits part initially. I vote for the bank job.
    2017: GCIH | LFCS
    2018: CySA+ | PenTest+ |CCNA CyberOps
    2019: VHL 20 boxes
    2020: OSCP 2020
  • AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Why is hands on better 
  • cyberguyprcyberguypr Senior Member Mod Posts: 6,878 Mod
    Because remotely you won't see the stupid physical layer stuff users do. You'll be left wondering why right-click isn't working when in reality the user is left-clicking and telling you he is using the right button.


  • AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Interesting, anyone else I need to make this decision asap! Thanks for the input all of you, very helpful!
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,400 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I guess it depends.   The first one sounds like an MSP.  Also, sounds like a full time role.  There are a ton of MSPs, so you can always find another MSP to work at if things change

    The bank will be quick cash. Also, you can learn and grow.  Plus the bank job sounds like-level 2 role.

    I say go with the bank
    The bank sounds like a level 2 role to me
    Also the bank is enterprise experience.   A lot of IT jobs are looking for enterprise experience.  You will probably get exposed to Service Now, SCCM, Mcafee Encrytion, imaging



    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Ok thank you, my mother is telling me to take the MSP job because of the benefits lol and she says I'm not young anymore but we know better right!I think I'm going to take the deskside contract for the reasons we mentioned, does anyone else have any input and again thank you guys it means a lot!
  • NetworkingStudentNetworkingStudent Member Posts: 1,400 ■■■■■■■■□□
    AODIT said:
    Ok thank you, my mother is telling me to take the MSP job because of the benefits lol and she says I'm not young anymore but we know better right!I think I'm going to take the deskside contract for the reasons we mentioned, does anyone else have any input and again thank you guys it means a lot!
    She does have a point there. You do need health insurance.

    Try making a pros and cons list for both jobs offers:

    Receiving two job offers can be both a blessing and a curse. Use these tips to learn how to choose between job offers.
    The Video:

    The website:

    https://www.topresume.com/career-advice/how-to-choose-between-job-offers-the-essential-guide?pt=YGccyYG4wZ5H&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook&utm_campaign=blog&utm_content=interview&utm_term=video

    From the web site:

    Start by writing down the components of your compensation package: salary, bonus, profit sharing, tuition reimbursement, healthcare coverage, and 401(k) match. Remember to add non-monetary things as well: fit with company culture, rapport with your future boss and co-workers, length of your commute, the possibility of flexible work arrangements. If family leave is or will be important in the near future, write that down too.

    Now that you have a list, choose five to six items that matter most. Be careful to look at your needs and wants in the short term as well as the long term. Then give each company a score between one and 10 for each of your priorities, with 10 being the best. When you add it all up, your result might look like this:

    Based on the math analysis, Company No. 2 is the winner with a higher overall score.

    Once you have this simple analysis done, think about one or two factors that matter most. Highlight them, so that you can pay attention to particularly high or low scores on those.


    Good Luck!!

    When one door closes, another opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the one which has opened."

    --Alexander Graham Bell,
    American inventor
  • AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Hmm, according to that the job with benefits etc would win. However the people who recommended the contract to hire position had a totally different assesment with a way different scoring system! Thank you.
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,774 ■■■■■■■■□□
    I don't know if this will impact your choice but in the New York City area a lot of banking jobs pay a premium for IT services. If you think you want to be in finance at all the bank might look good on your resume.

    I would personally prefer desk-side support but an MSP is a great place to learn. It sounds to  me like your question is about which choice is better for your career and that requires a little understanding of where you want to end up.

    Both jobs are going to present you good opportunities you just have to remember to take advantage to them. Career development starts at getting hired it does not end there.
  • AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Going with the deskside support, start on Monday, going to tell the other place it's a no go. Any advice for me as start this new venture? Thanks 
  • Neil86Neil86 Member Member Posts: 126 ■■■□□□□□□□
    edited September 2019
    Be a super absorbent sponge. Keep a journal of notes, findings, tips and tricks, etc. Show willingness to learn and stay positive. Keep your chin up through the stressful times. Even those are great learning experiences. Good luck.
  • Jon_CiscoJon_Cisco Member Posts: 1,774 ■■■■■■■■□□
    Just remember the end user is your customer. They only call you when they have a problem so don't take it personally if they are impatient. Be polite and offer to help.
  • itdeptitdept Registered Users Posts: 80 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Don't go with MSP. Take the bank job and keep up the hard work and study. My 2 cents
  • SweenMachineSweenMachine MCSA: Office 365, MCSA: Windows 7 (I am old), ITIL Foundations V3 Chicago areaMember Posts: 300 ■■■■□□□□□□
    It is funny to me how much anti-MSP sentiment there is (says the MSP executive hah)

    I think every situation is different, and I have seen it go both ways. I have had staff leave to go work for larger corporations and love it, and I have seen people ask to come back because they miss the challenge of an MSP.  Additionally, some people love the challenge of a single enterprise, others like the challenge of many smaller (and generally inconsistent) environments. 

    I will say this; I worked for a large, 50+ billion dollar revenue pharmaceutical company for 7 years that may or may not rhyme with Babbott Laboratories. I worked hard, loved the benefits, (still) love the company and mission and then people who make much more money than me decided they could easily off-shore the entire operation, and they did and I became unemployed. 

    I love working for an MSP because I feel a sense of security (oddly) in being the one who provides the talent for those outsourcing verse being in a seat that can be outsourced. When I started at the lowest level, I have never learned more in my LIFE than I did the first year working at an MSP. I also work for a decently sized MSP in the Chicago area, that has established a large presence in a very specific niche market (Senior Living/Long Term Care) so perhaps my view of MSPs is warped a bit as well.

    With all that said, sounds like you made a logical and intelligent decision based on your life situation; best of luck!

    -scott
  • AODITAODIT Member Posts: 39 ■■■□□□□□□□
Sign In or Register to comment.