Advice on how to stand out as a cable installer/low voltage tech?

Alhaji265Alhaji265 Member Posts: 203 ■■■□□□□□□□
I have worked on several projects as the title above. With several months of experience, what are ways to stand out? I'm assertive but there are times I don't have much of a clue what's occurring.

Answers

  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Member Posts: 611 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Well, typically how you stand out as anything is to ensure it's on your resume in your job experiences along with what you accomplished with it. Make sure that you list your jobs that you did cable installation and work with low voltage. Anytime on those jobs you completed a cable installation project ahead of time or without using all the materials, list that as an accomplishment. Emphasize - but don't spam - cable installation and low voltage work on your resume.
    Rather than assertion, be confident and enthusiastic.
  • Alhaji265Alhaji265 Member Posts: 203 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Well, typically how you stand out as anything is to ensure it's on your resume in your job experiences along with what you accomplished with it. Make sure that you list your jobs that you did cable installation and work with low voltage. Anytime on those jobs you completed a cable installation project ahead of time or without using all the materials, list that as an accomplishment. Emphasize - but don't spam - cable installation and low voltage work on your resume.
    Rather than assertion, be confident and enthusiastic.

    What I meant while I am on the field?
  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Member Posts: 611 ■■■■■□□□□□
    Alhaji265 said:

    What I meant while I am on the field?
    If by on the field, you mean on the job, just do quality work, complete it in a timely fashion, always exhibit professionalism and courtesy to colleagues and customers. Even if people don't comment anything, being a likeable friendly person on the job who accomplishes the work quickly and to high standards will get you noticed.

  • DFTK13DFTK13 Member Posts: 116 ■■■■□□□□□□
    @Alhaji265

    if you have a subscription to CBTNuggets, I highly recommend you watch Jeremy Cioara’s IT cabling series. It really put into perspective of what exactly goes on in running Cat5-6, different tools and methodologies as well as the overall design of good network cabling design. I know it helped me. 

    Aside from that, all I can say is be a good and hard worker, research the kind of projects and work you’re involved in, don’t just rely on your supervisors or more knowledgeable co-workers to give you all the answers. Be humble and open to constructive criticism and learn from it. 
    Current Certs: LPI Linux Essentials
    Expired: CompTIA A+, Net+, CCENT
    Goals: CCNA, RHCSA, VCP6-DCV

    Degree: A.S. Network Administration
    Pursuing: B.S. in I.T. Web and Mobile Development Concentration
  • thomas_thomas_ CompTIA N+/S+/L+; CCNA R&S; CCNP R&S Member Posts: 922 ■■■■■■□□□□
    You can buy the BICSI "Information Technology Systems Installation Methods" (ITSMM) manual and read through it.  At $260 it's a little pricey, but it's a good read for understanding the proper way to install structured cabling:

    https://www.bicsi.org/education-certification/[email protected]/technical-publications/information-technology-systems-installation-methods

    It has a lot of good information that might help you understand what's going on.  Also, it might cause you to die on the inside as you see just how much structured cabling isn't done to code/standards.  I'm not even talking minor stuff, but major stuff like just tossing cable across the ceiling tiles and not using plenum-rated cable when it should be used which are both life and health threatening if a fire breaks out.

    You can get BICSI certified.  They have copper and fiber cabling installation certification courses along with other ones.  Here's a link to their cabling installation certification:

    https://www.bicsi.org/education-certification/certification/cabling-installation
  • LordQarlynLordQarlyn Member Posts: 611 ■■■■■□□□□□
    thomas_ said:
    You can buy the BICSI "Information Technology Systems Installation Methods" (ITSMM) manual and read through it.  At $260 it's a little pricey, but it's a good read for understanding the proper way to install structured cabling:

    https://www.bicsi.org/education-certification/[email protected]/technical-publications/information-technology-systems-installation-methods

    It has a lot of good information that might help you understand what's going on.  Also, it might cause you to die on the inside as you see just how much structured cabling isn't done to code/standards.  I'm not even talking minor stuff, but major stuff like just tossing cable across the ceiling tiles and not using plenum-rated cable when it should be used which are both life and health threatening if a fire breaks out.

    You can get BICSI certified.  They have copper and fiber cabling installation certification courses along with other ones.  Here's a link to their cabling installation certification:

    https://www.bicsi.org/education-certification/certification/cabling-installation

    Snap, I had forgotten all about BCSI! Yes indeed, if you are not BCSI certified, getting it will help your career and stand out from those without the certification.
  • SteveLavoieSteveLavoie Member Posts: 697 ■■■■■□□□□□
    What help a lot for cabling tech is to build a portfolio of jobs (if your NDA permit). Show a couple of before and after. 
  • draughtdraught Member Posts: 229 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Does your company do anything other than cabling? The thing is even if you are recognized as the best low voltage tech ever. There's no path to promotion for that kind of job beyond senior tech or manager.
    Do a good job but plan to move on (unless you truly enjoy the work). There's ok income for fiber optics experts if you're really set on the more physical side of IT. 

    If I were you my entire goal would be to find another IT job within the next 3 months. Apply for any entry level IT position. Ideally look for field technician positions which will value that you have experience installing cat5/6,  fiber and switches/routers.

    I can terminate cable myself but I'm slow at it. In an interview anyone working in IT will like that you have that you have expert cabling skill so be sure to empathize it.






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