HOST, LMHOST

HENNOHENNO Member Posts: 31 ■■□□□□□□□□
Could any one clarify the difference between, HOSTS and LMHOST.
Thanks

Comments

  • TheShadowTheShadow Member Posts: 1,057 ■■■■■■□□□□
    Historically it is a Microsoft thing. Normally you only have a hosts file in things like Linux. The LM stands for Lan manager. It helped NETBIOS work mostly.

    http://support.microsoft.com/?kbid=105997
    In Windows NT, the HOSTS file is for TCP/IP utilities, and the LMHOSTS file is for LAN Manager NET utilities. If you cannot PING another computer (using a friendly name), check the HOSTS file. If you cannot NET VIEW a server using only the TCP/IP protocol, check the LMHOSTS file.
    Who knows what evil lurks in the heart of technology?... The Shadow DO
  • sprkymrksprkymrk Member Posts: 4,884 ■■■□□□□□□□
    For the test just remember:
    A hosts file resolves host names to ip addresses.
    An lmhosts file resolves netbios names to ip addresses.
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • agustinchernitskyagustinchernitsky Member Posts: 299
    Hello,

    LMHOSTS is used in WINS resolution. Normally, there are ways to resolve NetBIOS names:

    1.- Using broadcasts
    2.- Using WINS servers
    3.- Reading LMHOSTS files

    The order depends on DHCP options or how you configure you local TCP/IP stack. Normally, if you don't use WINS servers, its: broadcasts then LMHOSTS.

    HOSTS file is used for "hosts", using FQDN. Normally you use DNS servers, but before they existed, people used hosts files to associate names with IPs.

    This was very difficult to mantain in big networks, so they invented DNS servers where all host names were centralized. Normally, you query a DNS then the Hostfile.

    WINS servers are used in networks were multiple logical segments are used... because NetBEUI is a non routable protocol. With WINS, legacy apps can register their NetBIOS names on a centralized server were all clients can query it.

    Hope it helps!
  • Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    WINS isn't used for Netbeui, it is used for TCP/IP to resolve Netbios names.
  • agustinchernitskyagustinchernitsky Member Posts: 299
    Yes, now its NetBIOS over TCP/IP. A long time ago was NetBIOS over NetBEUI.

    Still, were did I say WINS was used for NetBEUI? Maybe I forgot to add that NetBIOS over TCP/IP replaced it :)

    Cheers!
  • Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    It seemed strongly implied with "WINS servers are used in networks were multiple logical segments are used... because NetBEUI is a non routable protocol. With WINS, legacy apps can register their NetBIOS names on a centralized server were all clients can query it. "
  • agustinchernitskyagustinchernitsky Member Posts: 299
    Hello Danman,

    Yep, maybe I should add the NetBIOS over TCP/IP next time... :)

    Saludos amigo.
  • Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    Thats why I so disliked the Security+ practice exam that had the answer to disable (unbind) neteui on the public interface of a 98 dual homed PC.
    Netbeui won't do any good on the internet. Now Netbios (AKA MS client/MS file/print sharing) bound on the public interface would indeed be a security problem.

    Netbios over TCP/IP name discovery broadcasts can't generally cross routers, so WINS does the netbios resolutions similar to how DNS servers resolve FQDNs.
  • blargoeblargoe Self-Described Huguenot NC, USAMember Posts: 4,174 ■■■■■■■■■□
    Danman32 wrote:
    Netbeui won't do any good on the internet. Now Netbios (AKA MS client/MS file/print sharing) bound on the public interface would indeed be a security problem.
    If you're not behind a router and had netbeui turned on, then any host using your ISP on the same subnet as you could have their way with you
    IT guy since 12/00

    Recent: 11/2019 - RHCSA (RHEL 7); 2/2019 - Updated VCP to 6.5 (just a few days before VMware discontinued the re-cert policy...)
    Working on: RHCE/Ansible
    Future: Probably continued Red Hat Immersion, Possibly VCAP Design, or maybe a completely different path. Depends on job demands...
  • Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    I don't think that was the intent of the question. Even with only IP, someone on the same segment of the ISP could have their way with you. The point was to not allow netbios access from the internet. Netbios is somewhere around the session layer. Netbeui is at the network layer.
  • agustinchernitskyagustinchernitsky Member Posts: 299
    Well, that is why you should disable Print / File sharing and MS net client bindings on an interface that is connected to the inet. MS strongly recommends this :)
  • Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    I KNOW this. My point was what was on a Security+ practice question that seems to use Netbios and NetBeui synonymously.
  • agustinchernitskyagustinchernitsky Member Posts: 299
    I know you know!!

    The fact that they write the exams doesn't mean they are right on all the concepts... although they should!

    Saludos amigo!
  • jpeezy55jpeezy55 Member Posts: 255
    sprkymrk wrote:
    For the test just remember:
    A hosts file resolves host names to ip addresses.
    An lmhosts file resolves netbios names to ip addresses.

    When I was studying for this exam, I would always get them mixed up...I found the easiest way to remember that LMHosts is for NetBios is to think of your alphabet... LMN -- LMhosts goes with Netbios. Once I made that simple connection, it made sense and I never forgot which was which and what it did.

    Just my goofy thought process in action... icon_rolleyes.gif
    Tech Support: "Ok, so your monitor is not working, the screen is blank, and no matter what you do it stays blank? Do you see that button on the bottom right hand side just below the screen? Press it. . . . Great, talk to you next time!"
  • Danman32Danman32 Member Posts: 1,243
    Hey, if it works, who cares? I kinda like it myself.
  • agustinchernitskyagustinchernitsky Member Posts: 299
    Not bad at all!!!
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