Binary Bit and Decimal Values

mgmguy1mgmguy1 Linux Essentials certified , Cisco CCENT certified PA Member Posts: 480 ■■■□□□□□□□
Team, I am having a really hard time understanding the Basic fundamentals of binary and deciam conversion.

I am useing the Syngress Network Plus Book by Robert J. Shimonski. I am on Page 336-337 and I am a bit lost. Is there a book or a Video I can buu that deals with only this subject matter. I know I can do this but I just need some help.

Thanks.
mgmguy1
"A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B."

Fats Domino

Comments

  • ally_ukally_uk Member Posts: 1,145 ■■■■□□□□□□
    To work out Binary I use this simple method

    For example take 192 in the decimal form

    to convert it to Binary write out the Base2 number system on a piece of paper

    ( Base 2 number system)

    128,64,32,16,8,4,2,1


    Now you have your decimal value of 192 and you want to convert it to binary it's pretty simple.

    The decimal value is made up of the Base2 number system in this case 128 + 64 = 192

    So what you do is put a 1 under those values which make up your decimal value

    128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1
    1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0

    So 192 converted to binary = 1.1.0.0.0.0.0.0

    128+64 are the binary values which make up 192 hence the 1s

    ....................................................................................................

    To convert binary to Decimal it's pretty simple

    For example your given the binary value 0.0.0.1.0.1.0.0

    Again write out the Base2 numbers

    128.64.32.16.8.4.2.1

    then fill in the values you are given

    128.64.32.16.8.4.2.1
    0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0

    Add up the 1s above

    So 16+ 4 = 20

    Thus the Binary value of 0.0.0.1.0.1.0.0 = 20


    Hope this helps this is my way of doing it
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
  • ally_ukally_uk Member Posts: 1,145 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Note there is a mistake in my post and for some reason the changes wont save
    ......................................................................


    Now you have your decimal value of 192 and you want to convert it to binary it's pretty simple.

    The decimal value is made up of the Base2 number system in this case 128 + 64 = 192

    So what you do is put a 1 under those values which make up your decimal value

    128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1
    1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

    So 192 converted to binary = 1.1.0.0.0.0.0.0

    128+64 are the binary values which make up 192 hence the 1s
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
  • ally_ukally_uk Member Posts: 1,145 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Did this help?
    Microsoft's strategy to conquer the I.T industry

    " Embrace, evolve, extinguish "
  • mgmguy1mgmguy1 Linux Essentials certified , Cisco CCENT certified PA Member Posts: 480 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Yes it did thank you. I Think I am getting the hang of this.
    "A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B."

    Fats Domino
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,352 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Good write-up ally_uk. Don't worry mgmguy1, after practice and working with it, you will be able to count binary in your head and perhaps do the subnetting in your head. It takes time. I know I certainly had quite a bit of trouble learning subnetting, but after practice it became easy. You'll get there. Just let us know if you need help and I'm sure there are plenty of people to help you out. :)
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • mgmguy1mgmguy1 Linux Essentials certified , Cisco CCENT certified PA Member Posts: 480 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Thanks. I am trying. Math is not my strong suite but I wil keep trying to understand it.
    KNow of any pre-formated questions like in a Math book I can do. You know. Q & A stuff
    "A lot of fellows nowadays have a B.A., M.D., or Ph.D. Unfortunately, they don't have a J.O.B."

    Fats Domino
  • nitishhnitishh Member Posts: 8 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Ally_uk is right about the binary stuff . The most imp point to remember is that a bit can have only 2 vlaues either ON or OFF

    1 stands for on and 0 stands for Off

    so if you wanted to write 192 in binary it basicly means that the two bits that are On are 128+64 the rest of the bits are off . Allways use the more significant bits .

    Similarly 10 would be

    0-0-0-0-1-0-1-0 or 1010 because the bit 8 and 2 are ON the rest are off


    128-64-32-16-8-4-2-1

    hope it helps
    MCSE, CCNA, CCNP, CCIE#13243, CISSP, CCSA
    Bit by Bit
  • deneb829deneb829 Member Posts: 292
    If you're having a hard time with the binary number places, a good way to think about would be to look at "normal" number places

    100,000 10,000 1000 100 10 1

    So, the number 154,306 would be
    1x 100,000 = 100,000
    5x 10,000 = 50,000
    4x 1,000 = 4000
    3x 100 = 300
    0x 10 = 00
    6x 1 = 6

    What you might not realize is that you are adding them all together to get the number one-hundred fifty-four thousand three-hundred and six.
    Remember with normal numbers (also called base 10 or decimal) each place can only have numbers between 0-9

    Now, let's look at the binary places. Instead of one's, tens, thousands, etc the places look like this:

    128 64 32 16 8 4 2 1

    and instead of the numbers 0-9 in each place, we can only have the numbers 0-1 (zero through one). We add them the exact same way we do with the normal numbers.

    So, the number 11011010 in binary would be
    1x 128 = 128
    1x 64 = 64
    0x 32 = 0
    1x 16 = 16
    1x 8 = 8
    0x 4 = 0
    1x 2 = 2
    0x 1 = 0

    or 128+64+16+8+2 = 218

    I hope this makes some sense.
    There are only 10 types of people in this world - People who understand binary and people who do not.
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