Just checked on my CompTIA status...

ResevenReseven Member Posts: 237 ■■■□□□□□□□
I just passed my A+ (2003) and I logged into CompTIA to check and see if they had received the test results. I was surprised to see this...
cert.gif
Is there any point to taking the 602,603, or 604? Should I not worry about anything else A+ related? I'm going for Net+ next.
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Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,312 ■■■■■■■■■□
    I personally think that if you are going to spend the time going for something more advanced, you'd probably be better off going the MS or Cisco route. If you feel need you a stronger foundation for those, I'd hit the Network+ (per your plan), Server+, and Security+. It really depends on what your goals are. Just remember, the extra certs and knowledge you gain along the way will never hurt you, so if they appeal to you, go for it.
  • Daniel333Daniel333 Member Posts: 2,077 ■■■■■■□□□□
    I personally regret wasting my time with Net+, I now feel (studying for my CCNA), that the CCNA is better recognized, is a better building block and the information makes your more viable in the real world. Net+ was so esoteric I wouldn't bother again, if I knew then, what I know now.

    But it can't hurt...
    -Daniel
  • KasorKasor Member Posts: 923 ■■■■□□□□□□
    Don't just go after certification...., know what career field that you are going to.
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  • int80hint80h Member Posts: 84 ■■□□□□□□□□
    There really are no place for the CompTIA certs in the IT industry. The CCNA and MCSA are they defacto entry level certs in the industry, so there really is no point going after these pre-entry level certs.
  • Megadeth4168Megadeth4168 Member Posts: 2,157
    int80h wrote:
    There really are no place for the CompTIA certs in the IT industry. The CCNA and MCSA are they defacto entry level certs in the industry, so there really is no point going after these pre-entry level certs.

    Not true... It really depends on where you are and what the employer is looking for. I got my current 40K+ job with just an A+ certification... The other factor is that I also had 3 years part time experience with the employer ahead of time... The only certification they were asking at the time of taking applications was an A+. I did not have the A+, so I studied for 2 weeks and passed both exams. Had I not passed those exams, my application would have been thrown out... That was one of the ways for them to weed out applications....

    The only reason I took the Network+ was to refresh myself on the concepts of Networking and because my employer was paying for the exam.

    I think you can move on from CompTIA exams now... Although I do highly recommend the Security+ exam. Not only because it is an elective for the MCSA/MCSE but also because I think there is a lot to gain and learn from this exam.
  • sthomassthomas Member Posts: 1,240 ■■■□□□□□□□
    int80h wrote:
    There really are no place for the CompTIA certs in the IT industry. The CCNA and MCSA are they defacto entry level certs in the industry, so there really is no point going after these pre-entry level certs.

    MCSA and CCNA are not entry level certs in my opinion. Also, A+ and Net+ were required for my current job and they have helped me throughout my IT career.
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  • JDMurrayJDMurray MSIT InfoSec CISSP SSCP GSEC EnCE C|EH Cloud+ CySA+ CASP+ PenTest+ Security+ Surf City, USAAdmin Posts: 12,273 Admin
    Microsoft recognizes the A+, Network+, and Security+ certs. So if you're going the MCSA/MCSE route they are not a wasted effort.
    ...and because my employer was paying for the exam.
    And never turn down any education that your employer is willing to pay for--even if it's a CompTIA certification exam.
  • royalroyal Member Posts: 3,352 ■■■■□□□□□□
    I've always preached that anyone going into any certification should go for A+ and Network+. They both provide excellent foundations.
    “For success, attitude is equally as important as ability.” - Harry F. Banks
  • MrfixitRightMrfixitRight Member Posts: 61 ■■□□□□□□□□
    sthomas wrote:
    int80h wrote:
    There really are no place for the CompTIA certs in the IT industry. The CCNA and MCSA are they defacto entry level certs in the industry, so there really is no point going after these pre-entry level certs.

    MCSA and CCNA are not entry level certs in my opinion. Also, A+ and Net+ were required for my current job and they have helped me throughout my IT career.

    I agree, they are definately NOT entry level. Now, the CompTIA A+ and to some extent, the Net+ are entry level certs, not "pre-entry" level. (What does that mean anyway? "Pre-entry" level?) For someone just starting out in the IT arena, I would suggest to get at least the A+, it can help you in your job search. (Employers do like to see certifications on a resume/job app) And having at least this one can't hurt as much as having none. Personally, I didn't take the A+ and Net+ exams until late in my career, but I got into the field a LONG time ago, and had the experience. The reason I finally took the A+ was that my employer at the time kept asking me about it, if I had it or not. So, I finally got tired of getting the 3rd degree and sat the exam on a Saturday, went back to work that Monday and showed my boss the results sheets. Three weeks after that I took the Net+ exam. Two months later I got a promotion! Go figure. (I already had, at that time, an MCP in Windows NT Workstation and Server.)
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    int80h wrote:
    There really are no place for the CompTIA certs in the IT industry. The CCNA and MCSA are they defacto entry level certs in the industry, so there really is no point going after these pre-entry level certs.

    I definitely disagree with this assumption of CompTIA certs. CompTIA certs do have their place, but it may not be in the same rankings as MCSA and CCNA, or MCSE and CCNP. When I worked at CompUSA as a PC technician, A+ was perfectly suitable for me. We also did home and small office networking for our customers, where we'd drive out and set up networks with Linksys/Netgear routers and workgroup computers. In these cases, Network+ was ideal. We also built custom systems, ranging from gaming rigs to servers, so both A+ and Server+ were encouraged. It fit what we did, in our situation.

    MCSA/MCSE, CCNA/CCNP, LPIC, RHCE, etc., also have their place. Some of them are entry-level for their environment. Administrating a network of a hundred users is a far cry from building systems and setting up Linksys routers. However, the MCSA, for example, would be considered "junior" or entry-level in situations like these. (By some companies, not all.) Of course, most of us look at MCSA and CCNA as mid-level certs, in comparison to what's out there.

    I think the perspective people have of CompTIA exams is a little skewed, in most cases. For a lot of us, taking the Linux+, for example, was a challenge. The reason being that most of us are used to Windows environments, and the CLI in Unix/Linux, along with the new filestructure, is a bit daunting. However, someone who has worked with Unix or Linux for ten or fifteen years wouldn't have trouble passing the Linux+ test. In fact, that's usually the type of person who may feel that it's a waste of time for them to take the Linux+ test when they could probably get more of a challenge from LPI, Red Hat, Sun, or any of the other more advanced Unix/Linux certs out there. That's the rub, though. . . just because you find something easy, doesn't mean that no one should 'waste their time on it'. You study and test on what's appropriate for your experience-level, your job-role, and/or what's in demand for the type of job you want.

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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,161 Mod
    Reseven wrote:
    I just passed my A+ (2003) and I logged into CompTIA to check and see if they had received the test results. I was surprised to see this...
    cert.gif
    Is there any point to taking the 602,603, or 604? Should I not worry about anything else A+ related? I'm going for Net+ next.

    It looks like the 2003 version of A+ really does provide an upgrade path to the new 2006 certs. From what I've heard, having an older A+ certification allows you to only take one of the speciality exams, and bypasses the needs for the "A+ Essentials" exam, altogether. As for upgrading, I'd say that you really have no reason to, unless you're going to be a PC technician. The basic concepts you learned in the 2003 tests, the foundational concepts regarding CPU's, memory, storage, doesn't really change. Access and performance speeds change, brand-names change, but the general concepts don't really change. Most certs, CompTIA ones especially, are created with the idea that you learn these types of concepts, in favor of specifics and particular tools and technology. Once you're A+ certified, even if you don't work in the field for a few years, you should be able to spend a little time perusing NewEgg, and be back in with what CPU goes at what speed, what motherboard supports what memory, etc.

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  • plettnerplettner Member Posts: 197
    icroyal wrote:
    I've always preached that anyone going into any certification should go for A+ and Network+. They both provide excellent foundations.

    I totally agree.

    If I were employing someone in desktop support or LAN support role that had A+ Network+ and maybe MCDST, I would choose them over someone with just an MCSA/MCSE.

    The CompTIA certs enables employers to determine someone with a foundation knowledge of PCs and networking.

    I have been employed in a organisation where they did not want people specifically with higher certs (such as MCSE), because they wanted to "mould" junior staff in a certain way that was beneficical to the organistaion . Network+ and A+ show that these people have a basic knowledge of IT but aren't "know-it-all-types" (just paraphrasing what the surpervisor told me).

    This organisation would then assess the juniors and then pay for them to go onto higher certs (MCSE being the big one). They mandated the staff should obtain their MCSE during their employment. That way they had staff who were certified and did things the "company way".
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