Security+ vs. Network+

CrunchyhippoCrunchyhippo Member Posts: 389
I just obtained my CCNA certification, and I was hoping to add to it before my CCNP classes began in January. I'm looking at Network+, as it would be easier I was told, but I'm more interested in Security+. However, how feasible would it be to be able to study and pass it before the end of December? Any advice?
"Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons." - Popular Mechanics, 1949

Comments

  • BigToneBigTone Member Posts: 283
    I would think if you had the CCNA, network+ would be a piece of cake. I would go for the Security+, but in all reality by january you should be able to get both if you study.
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    After just completing the CCNA, you should be able to through the Net+ in a few weeks. If you already have the CCNA, there is not a lot of value in adding the Net+.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • Megadeth4168Megadeth4168 Member Posts: 2,157
    It took me about 3 months to study for and pass my Security+. So I don't see it being too big a problem passing it before the end of December.
  • ConstantlyLearningConstantlyLearning Member Posts: 445
    Don't bother with the N+ since you have the CCNA.

    It's definately feasible to be ready to take the S+ by the end of December.
    "There are 3 types of people in this world, those who can count and those who can't"
  • KGhaleonKGhaleon Member Posts: 1,346 ■■■□□□□□□□
    I didn't see much of a point in getting Network+ and Security+, they haven't really helped me any. They just take up room on your resume. Instead of Network+, get a cisco cert. Instead of Security+, go get one of those pretty security certs.

    A+ seems to be the only useful thing to get from Comptia, but that's just my opinion.

    KG
    Present goals: MCAS, MCSA, 70-680
  • CrunchyhippoCrunchyhippo Member Posts: 389
    A co-worker who has passed Security+ said that she found the study material dry and boring, and she didn't care for it at all. Since I've never explored it, I wouldn't know. Does anyone share her view on this?
    "Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons." - Popular Mechanics, 1949
  • Megadeth4168Megadeth4168 Member Posts: 2,157
    KGhaleon wrote:
    I didn't see much of a point in getting Network+ and Security+, they haven't really helped me any. They just take up room on your resume. Instead of Network+, get a cisco cert. Instead of Security+, go get one of those pretty security certs.

    A+ seems to be the only useful thing to get from Comptia, but that's just my opinion.

    KG

    Security+ counted as my elective for my MCSA and one of my electives for my MCSE. It also counts as an elective for MCSE:Security.

    So, for someone going the MCSE route it really is not a waste of time.
  • snadamsnadam Member Posts: 2,234 ■■■■□□□□□□

    Security+ counted as my elective for my MCSA and one of my electives for my MCSE. It also counts as an elective for MCSE:Security.

    So, for someone going the MCSE route it really is not a waste of time.


    Ditto. Yes, Sec+ material can be boring, but as megadeth implied, it is very handy cert especially if you go the MCSA/MCSE route.

    I passed my net+ and sec+ in approx 4 months time. Im no CCNA, but I studied for net+ in 3 weeks time and passed; not a great score, but passed. Sec+ I took 2 hardcore months of studying. The material was quite new to me, and I took extra time to learn it. I pulled away with a fairly decent score.

    your timeframe seems fine for passing both exams, let alone sec+. There is some overlap from net+ to sec+ also.
    **** ARE FOR CHUMPS! Don't be a chump! Validate your material with certguard.com search engine

    :study: Current 2015 Goals: JNCIP-SEC JNCIS-ENT CCNA-Security
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945 ■■■■□□□□□□
    A co-worker who has passed Security+ said that she found the study material dry and boring, and she didn't care for it at all. Since I've never explored it, I wouldn't know. Does anyone share her view on this?

    I think the material is very interesting, and I wish I had more time to prepare for the exam right now.
    Andy

    2020 Goals: 0 of 2 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • msnelgrovemsnelgrove Member Posts: 167
    There are some parts of Security+ like that. The majority I found is quite interesting
  • SchluepSchluep Member Posts: 346
    A co-worker who has passed Security+ said that she found the study material dry and boring, and she didn't care for it at all. Since I've never explored it, I wouldn't know. Does anyone share her view on this?

    It all depends on your level of knowledge and what interests you:

    A. If security does not interest you then you will find it dry and boring. I have no interest in reading a book about what folks in Hollywood are doing to ruin their lives, yet these such things sell in a very high numbers. Clearly someone has an interest, but that doesn't make it right for me.

    B. If you Security interests you and you are highly experienced then a beginning book may not be interesting since you are very familiar with the content at a higher level. I enjoy mathmatics but would be very bored reading a book on how to add and subtract whole numbers.

    C. If Security interests you and you have a lot to learn then it would definitely not be boring or dry. In fact you would probably find it to be a very interesting read.




    I guess the bottom line is that you can't neccessarily base what your experience will be off of someone else's experience when it comes to a topic of interest. Are there some books that are poorly written and therefore a difficult read regardless of interest level? Of course there are, but you can't assume this is the case off of one person stating that they found a book boring.

    As you stated you have a CCNA already and many people have posted comments here and in your other thread regarding the value of the ceritification based upon the experience and certification you already have. Where you go from here is up to you.

    Personally I am transitioning from Database to InfoSec and found that taking the CISSP exam first to become an Associate of (ISC)2 worked well for me. Just because I don't have the work experience doesn't mean it wasn't a good option for me a valuable learning experience.

    I don't see any reason why you couldn't obtain these certifications by December. While some could argue your time may be better spent on other paths, having them certainly won't hurt you if it is something you want to do.
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