Linux Server which Distro to use

datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
Gang,

I'm new to Linux, so I wanted to know which distro and version is good for someone new to Linux. Right now I learning with Red Hat ver. 9 'strike' in client mode, but i want o create a domain and have accounts authnticate with a server to get some real environment hands-on experience.

Thank you,
Datchcha
Arrakis

Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    CentOS, OpenSUSE, Debian/Ubuntu, etc.
  • datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
    dynamik wrote:
    CentOS, OpenSUSE, Debian/Ubuntu, etc.

    do these distros give the option to install a Server version? Example like Red Hat 9.0?

    thank you,
    Arrakis
  • sthomassthomas Posts: 1,240Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    I know for sure that CentOS does have a Server option and Desktop option. Not sure about OpenSUSE, but Ubuntu you have to download the Server version seperatley and it does not install the GUI by default from what I have been told. Check out www.distrowatch.com for information on different Linux distros.
    Working on: MCSA 2012 R2
  • undomielundomiel Posts: 2,818Member
    For openSUSE during install it doesn't present a specific server option but it gives you plenty of options to strip out unnecessary things i.e. a GUI and to add in things like Samba and command line tools. You can basically customize for a workstation or for a server easily.
    Jumping on the IT blogging band wagon -- http://www.jefferyland.com/
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    If you want to learn about the foundations of Linux, then I'd say start by getting yourself a copy of each of the following:

    Red Hat (Fedora)
    Debian
    Slackware

    Pretty much every flavor of Linux out there today is based on one of these three operating systems. All the RPM-based distros, like Red Hat, SuSE, etc will be similar, (but not identical). All the Debian-based OSes, like Ubuntu and Gentoo, will be similar. And then, of course, there is the granddaddy of them all, one of the oldest distros out there, Slackware. If you learn as much as you can about these three distros, then you'll be ready to tackle just about anything you'd find in the Linux world and go for distro-specific knowledge and tools. Incidentally, these are also the three core operating systems that CompTIA's Linux+ and the LPI certifications test you on. If you're looking to get some hands-on experience with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but don't have the cash to pay for it, you can check out CentOS. It's a free operating system that is designed to have all the features of Red Hat Enterprise. Just remember, it's not an exact copy, but it comes very close and will give you 99% of the experience you'd have on Red Hat, (without the support from Red Hat engineers).

    There are lots of things to learn, when coming from a Windows environment. The main difference, for example, between a desktop operating system and a server operating system is the types of applications that come included on the disc or download. There are also differences in how the file system(s) are laid out, such as Unix V and BSD. There's a lot to learn, and don't be afraid to ask questions when you're stuck or don't know what to do. I've also got a couple of good recommendations for books and online resources to help you out further:

    Sites to Bookmark
    LinuxQuestions.org - Whereas TechExams is a cert-specific site, this is a general-knowledge forum for Linux users and adminstrators.

    DistroWatch - A site dedicated to providing information and downloads of the latest Linux distros.

    The Linux Documentation Project - Pretty much everything and anything related to setting up or troubleshooting Linux is gathered here.

    And, of course, make sure you check the documentation available on the distro-providers' sites. Usually, they'll have forums and FAQs, as well as general documents and additional tools available to help you.


    Books to Check Out

    Running Linux

    Linux in a Nutshell

    Linux Systems Administrators Guide

    Linux Network Administrators Guide

    Linux in a Windows World

    And, of course, don't forget to check out books and resources on specific applications/services you run, such as DNS, web servers, or even Windows compatibility and software integration.


    In addition to Linux, you might also want to check out some of the Unix distros out there, like FreeBSD or Solaris, to broaden your experience with *NIX operating systems.

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    Let it never be said that I didn't do the very least I could do.
  • datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
    Slowhand wrote:
    If you want to learn about the foundations of Linux, then I'd say start by getting yourself a copy of each of the following:

    Red Hat (Fedora)
    Debian
    Slackware

    Pretty much every flavor of Linux out there today is based on one of these three operating systems. All the RPM-based distros, like Red Hat, SuSE, etc will be similar, (but not identical). All the Debian-based OSes, like Ubuntu and Gentoo, will be similar. And then, of course, there is the granddaddy of them all, one of the oldest distros out there, Slackware. If you learn as much as you can about these three distros, then you'll be ready to tackle just about anything you'd find in the Linux world and go for distro-specific knowledge and tools. Incidentally, these are also the three core operating systems that CompTIA's Linux+ and the LPI certifications test you on. If you're looking to get some hands-on experience with Red Hat Enterprise Linux, but don't have the cash to pay for it, you can check out CentOS. It's a free operating system that is designed to have all the features of Red Hat Enterprise. Just remember, it's not an exact copy, but it comes very close and will give you 99% of the experience you'd have on Red Hat, (without the support from Red Hat engineers).

    There are lots of things to learn, when coming from a Windows environment. The main difference, for example, between a desktop operating system and a server operating system is the types of applications that come included on the disc or download. There are also differences in how the file system(s) are laid out, such as Unix V and BSD. There's a lot to learn, and don't be afraid to ask questions when you're stuck or don't know what to do. I've also got a couple of good recommendations for books and online resources to help you out further:

    Sites to Bookmark
    LinuxQuestions.org - Whereas TechExams is a cert-specific site, this is a general-knowledge forum for Linux users and adminstrators.

    DistroWatch - A site dedicated to providing information and downloads of the latest Linux distros.

    The Linux Documentation Project - Pretty much everything and anything related to setting up or troubleshooting Linux is gathered here.

    And, of course, make sure you check the documentation available on the distro-providers' sites. Usually, they'll have forums and FAQs, as well as general documents and additional tools available to help you.


    Books to Check Out

    Running Linux

    Linux in a Nutshell

    Linux Systems Administrators Guide

    Linux Network Administrators Guide

    Linux in a Windows World

    And, of course, don't forget to check out books and resources on specific applications/services you run, such as DNS, web servers, or even Windows compatibility and software integration.


    In addition to Linux, you might also want to check out some of the Unix distros out there, like FreeBSD or Solaris, to broaden your experience with *NIX operating systems.

    Thank you - both of you have been super helpful...I am taking 70-270 this weekend, and afterward hope to start on Linux+...thanks again.
    Arrakis
  • datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
    I played around with Ubuntu a while back (6 months), and noticed how by default most of the screen items were broad or larger then what i wanted. I know this is just a facial issue with cosmetics, but it just didn't feel right and i couldn't get over it, but i was going from Red Hat 9.0 to Ubuntu. Not sure which version I installed, on the road right now...

    thank you,
    Arrakis
  • remyforbes777remyforbes777 Posts: 499Member
    Why don't you do a net install, which installs the bare minimum to get the OS up and on the network, then download only the packages you need. This is how I do all my Debian installs.
  • datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
    Why don't you do a net install, which installs the bare minimum to get the OS up and on the network, then download only the packages you need. This is how I do all my Debian installs.
    \

    Wow...easy now (smiles) I am not that advanced with Linux of any Distro...yet. Yet i say...hope to be there pretty soon.

    That's right...Ubuntu is similar to Debian..or Debian packages...

    Thank you,
    Arrakis
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    Why don't you do a net install, which installs the bare minimum to get the OS up and on the network, then download only the packages you need. This is how I do all my Debian installs.

    This is the best way to learn, really. Once you've got yourself some basic familiarity with the distro you want to start with, do a bare-bones install and begin working with individual software packages from scratch. It's how I learned to administrate X11: I installed a copy of Fedora without any GUI at all, and installed X11 and the applicable desktop manager from scratch, using both tarballs (.tgz files containing source code you compile yourself) and RPM's. Doing this will not only teach you the ins and outs of the software you're using, it'll also help you learn more about, and feel more in control of, your operating system.

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  • datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
    Slowhand wrote:
    Why don't you do a net install, which installs the bare minimum to get the OS up and on the network, then download only the packages you need. This is how I do all my Debian installs.

    This is the best way to learn, really. Once you've got yourself some basic familiarity with the distro you want to start with, do a bare-bones install and begin working with individual software packages from scratch. It's how I learned to administrate X11: I installed a copy of Fedora without any GUI at all, and installed X11 and the applicable desktop manager from scratch, using both tarballs (.tgz files containing source code you compile yourself) and RPM's. Doing this will not only teach you the ins and outs of the software you're using, it'll also help you learn more about, and feel more in control of, your operating system.

    Slowhand - what is X11? i'm looking into it right now...thank.
    Arrakis
  • PashPash Posts: 1,601Member ■■■■■□□□□□
    CENTOS is great for using distro like Red Hat as mentioned above. I am gonna install if to VMware this week for my lab.
    DevOps Engineer and Security Champion. https://blog.pash.by - I am trying to find my writing style, so please bear with me.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    datchcha wrote:
    Slowhand - what is X11? i'm looking into it right now...thank.

    Click on the link above, and you'll be taken to the X11 homepage. The short version is that X11 (and programs like it) provide the GUI for various Linux and Unix distros. They run just below the window managers, like Gnome and KDE.

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  • datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
    Thanks for the help gang, One last question.

    Now that i have Fedora Core 7 on my laptop and forcing myself to use Linux. I need to configure a Cisco Router, and in the past on my windows machine i always used hyperterminal with a rollover cable.

    What (if there is any) is the linux version of Hyperterminal?

    Thank you,
    Cheers!!!!!
    Arrakis
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    The first thing you need to do is make sure you have SSH on your Linux box, and that it's set up properly.

    After that, it's a matter of setting up SSH access on your Cisco device. You can also check out this video if you're having trouble. It shows configuration happening from within Windows, but the setup on the router and the commands you have to run are the same.

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  • sprkymrksprkymrk Posts: 4,884Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    datchcha wrote:
    What (if there is any) is the linux version of Hyperterminal?

    I saw this:

    gtkterm http://freshmeat.net/projects/gtkterm/?topic_id=20
    All things are possible, only believe.
  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    Look into minicom as well.
  • seuss_ssuesseuss_ssues Posts: 629Member
    sprkymrk wrote:
    datchcha wrote:
    What (if there is any) is the linux version of Hyperterminal?

    I saw this:

    gtkterm http://freshmeat.net/projects/gtkterm/?topic_id=20

    I have no experience with what sprkymrk recommended and it may be a great product. But i have used minicom several times. It is command line only though. If you choose to use it just google minicom +cisco and your sure to find a step by step setup.
  • remyforbes777remyforbes777 Posts: 499Member
    The Linux equivalent is called minicom. There is also a graphical version called cutecom. There is some configuration involved but that will help you with your quest with becoming more versed in Linux.
  • datchchadatchcha Posts: 265Member
    Thanks gang...will be trying everything...

    Cheers!!!
    Arrakis
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