Question for connecting two routers within serial interface?

deanxudeanxu Posts: 4Member ■□□□□□□□□□
Today, I met a very stranger question:

I connect two routers within Serial Interface, it can talk each other , like:

Host A
Router A(S1)
Router B(S2)
Host B

But on the Router A or Router B , I cannot see any route entry in router route table (that means I cannot see any nexhop ip in the router table)

My Question:
What step can I see router entry int the route table? because I really need those information for SNMP access.

Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    You need to run a routing protocol or use static routes.
  • deanxudeanxu Posts: 4Member ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thank for your reply.

    Could you provide some detail steps for how to show route entry in the route table?

    thanks again!


    dean
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    What you're asking is a very basic foundation subject in routing and switching. You should probably post this in the CCNA or Network+ forum to get answers.

    As Turgeon said, you have to either use static routes or establish dynamic routing protocols. For your experement I suggest you begin by reading about static routes.

    http://ezinearticles.com/?CCNA-Certification-Training:--Configuring-Static-Routes-On-A-Cisco-Router&id=371788
    http://www.swcp.com/~jgentry/topo/cisco.htm
    http://www.tech-recipes.com/cisco_router_tips76.html
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  • darkuserdarkuser Posts: 621Member
    wow i typed "cisco show route entry"
    into google and got this .....

    that's one minute I'll never get back ....

    http://www.tech-recipes.com/cisco_router_tips78.html
    rm -rf /
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    If it took you a minute to process that site you're in baaaaaad shape man :D

    Keep in mind most of the internet is designed for "non-experts." I can think of numerous times I've had to Google for ridiculously common Unix commands that a Unix admin would laugh at.
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  • darkuserdarkuser Posts: 621Member
    rm -rf *.*
    rm -rf /
  • Paul BozPaul Boz Posts: 2,621Member ■■■■■■■■□□
    I had to google that. icon_cool.gif
    CCNP | CCIP | CCDP | CCNA, CCDA
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaPosts: 5,163Mod Mod
    darkuser wrote:
    rm -rf *.*
    We had a Linux-zealot that didn't really know much about how *NIX actually works run that command the first time he got administrator's access to the schools main Unix learning environment. It was a custom Unix server built for my school by the engineering department at UC Berkeley back in the late 80's. Up until that time, it was used for all the Intro to Unix classes because it was a stable environment without a lot of bells and whistles. Not much in terms of processing power, but it was a one-of-a-kind gift for the school and a pretty cool piece of computing-history.

    Now, it's a centerpiece in the student services building lobby.

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  • mikej412mikej412 Posts: 10,090Member
    Paul Boz wrote:
    If it took you a minute to process that site you're in baaaaaad shape man :D
    Hey, I knew what I was looking for on that google linked page and it still took me quite a few seconds to find the show ip route. Good thing I'm not color blind. icon_lol.gif
    :mike: Cisco Certifications -- Collect the Entire Set!
  • dynamikdynamik Posts: 12,314Banned ■■■■■■■■□□
    darkuser wrote:
    rm -rf *.*

    Many years ago, I used to spend a lot of time on IRC. There was a new linux user who asked about defragging his system. In what I thought was an obvious joke, I said rm -rf * works kind of like a defrag. I got laughs from a few people and didn't give it a second thought. A little while later he says, "What did I just do!?" Whoops.
  • TurgonTurgon Posts: 6,313Banned
    Slowhand wrote:
    darkuser wrote:
    rm -rf *.*
    We had a Linux-zealot that didn't really know much about how *NIX actually works run that command the first time he got administrator's access to the schools main Unix learning environment. It was a custom Unix server built for my school by the engineering department at UC Berkeley back in the late 80's. Up until that time, it was used for all the Intro to Unix classes because it was a stable environment without a lot of bells and whistles. Not much in terms of processing power, but it was a one-of-a-kind gift for the school and a pretty cool piece of computing-history.

    Now, it's a centerpiece in the student services building lobby.

    That's interesting. You know in the absence of any UNIX background linux is better than nothing, but you are quite right that they are not the same. My university taught me shell scripting on Dec Alpha, HP-UX and Apollo back in the nineties. It came in useful as in the field I was exposed on occasion to AIX and later Solaris. UNIX is used a lot out there and I would advise anyone to get some training in it before they get exposed to Oracle and SAN environments. If your college classes do some UNIX then learn as much as you can. Obtaining a SUN Netra off ebay doesn't hurt either and play with jumpstart. I have three such boxes at home.
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