Question for people with some callmanager experience.

nice343nice343 Member Posts: 391
voice_topology.jpg

I just started really learning callmanager and I have a question.

the router which is acting as a gateway has an T1 connection to the PSTN

so what I am guessing is I create a dial-peer and point it to the PSTN on the router and after that I create a route-pattern on the callmanager server and point it to the router (gateway). is this the correct way?
dial-peer voice 1 pots
destination-pattern 9T
port 1/0/1:12
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Comments

  • LuckycharmsLuckycharms Member Posts: 267
    Are you using MGCP or H.323 ??? If you are new to Call Manager the easiest way is going to be using MGCP.... With mgcp most of all your dial peers will be built and controlled on the actual CCM box, and the gateways query that box for call setup. But I am not going the whole call structure for MGCP vs. H.323...

    But to answer your question. Your MGCP dial peers will look like this if you have a PRI.

    dial-peer voice XXX pots
    application mgcpapp
    port X/X/X

    If you give us more information on the kind of setup you are trying to build I will be more then happy to point you in the right direction for hours of reading.
    The quality of a book is never equated to the number of words it contains. -- And neither should be a man by the number of certifications or degree's he has earned.
  • nice343nice343 Member Posts: 391
    I am using h.323

    I am not totally new to cisco VOIP. I know how to configure callmanager express in and out I just wanted to broaden my knowlege by learning callmanager. And yes I know the difference between MGCP and H.323
    My daily blog about IT and tech stuff
    http://techintuition.com/
  • LuckycharmsLuckycharms Member Posts: 267
    Ok, then just create an H.323 gateway in call manager and create a dial-peer on the gateway to point out to the PSTN. You should be good after that.

    as for you destination pattern ... 9T is not usually stated that way because you usually use the 9 to tell the gateway/Call Manager this is an external call. So that is doesn't try to match internal extensions with the first 3/4 digits that are dialed. what you are saying in that statement is match 9anything... and pass 9anything...

    9.T is usually the way it is stated and the 9 is usually stripped off depending on how you want to send it. Sorry if this is confusing ... I am on my 3rd cup of coffee and 3 hours of sleep... but if you are still having trouble please post.
    The quality of a book is never equated to the number of words it contains. -- And neither should be a man by the number of certifications or degree's he has earned.
  • nice343nice343 Member Posts: 391
    I need to get this right.

    on the callmanager the route pattern has been configured as [email protected] to point to the router. is is still safe to use the 9.T on the router to point it to the PSTN? because from what I understand with the [email protected] the callmanager strips off the 9 before it sends it to the router /Gateway
    My daily blog about IT and tech stuff
    http://techintuition.com/
  • LuckycharmsLuckycharms Member Posts: 267
    Cisco Call Manager installations in North America are able to use the '@' macro in the route patterns to allow the use of variable length dial plans. If a caller dials a seven digit local number, or a ten/eleven digit long distance number, the call will be sent out to the public switched telephone network (PSTN) immediately after the last digit is dialed. However, this macro does not work outside of North America.


    Read this page, its a little dated but still good reading. http://www.cisco.com/warp/public/788/AVVID/dp_isdn_gateway.html It should start helping about half way down the page.
    The quality of a book is never equated to the number of words it contains. -- And neither should be a man by the number of certifications or degree's he has earned.
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