IT Test?

flurrballflurrball Member Posts: 50 ■■□□□□□□□□
I have been spamming my resume EVERYWHERE, and I just got a call back from a resort, they want to administer an IT Test. I played it cool on the phone and made an appointment for tomorrow morning, but I am really nervous.

I just got my CCENT and I'm studying for CCNA so I should be up on the networking stuff, but I got my A+ years ago, and I'm not really sure what to expect. The job is a System Analyst I position, so I'm guessing it will encompass more than just networking, is it even worth it to brain **** for a day? What kinds of questions are even usually asked with IT Tests? Is it simple ones like where do you insert memory sticks for upgrades, or hard ones?
Just stressing a little, I need a job pretty badly, and don't want to mess it up. Anyone with advice or experience is appreciated.

Comments

  • undomielundomiel Member Posts: 2,818
    No need to brain ****. Polish what you do know and don't worry about what you don't know. One company I applied for it seemed like the test was basically taken from the Network+ which I had never studied for. I wasn't even expecting a test they just plopped down in front of it during my interview. I applied what knowledge I had and got a decent score. They were impressed and continued on through the interview. I got the job. I saw people who I know scored worse get the job as well. It was more about the interview than the actual test from what I could tell. They just wanted to make sure of a certain minimal level of technical knowledge. So don't worry too much about it, if you know what you know you'll be fine.
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  • TurgonTurgon Banned Posts: 6,313
    flurrball wrote:
    I have been spamming my resume EVERYWHERE, and I just got a call back from a resort, they want to administer an IT Test. I played it cool on the phone and made an appointment for tomorrow morning, but I am really nervous.

    I just got my CCENT and I'm studying for CCNA so I should be up on the networking stuff, but I got my A+ years ago, and I'm not really sure what to expect. The job is a System Analyst I position, so I'm guessing it will encompass more than just networking, is it even worth it to brain **** for a day? What kinds of questions are even usually asked with IT Tests? Is it simple ones like where do you insert memory sticks for upgrades, or hard ones?
    Just stressing a little, I need a job pretty badly, and don't want to mess it up. Anyone with advice or experience is appreciated.

    Just relax and show up. Often the deal is to see how you react. In my case I answered..yup good at that, ok at the other..forgot that but did it..new to me but would like to learn it. I got the job over a guy who said yup..done that, done this, done everything.

    My boss told me this later after my hire.
  • flurrballflurrball Member Posts: 50 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Guess I'll just see what happens then, the job was listed as entry level anyway, so I'm sure I have at least that. Thanks for the advice.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    Look at it this way: if it's a non-IT person administering the test, it'll probably be a very basic set of questions. Your experience with the CCNA, A+, etc. should be more than enough to prepare you. Just make sure you have a good understanding of the job-requirements for the position you're applying, and you should be fine.

    If it's an IT person, like a CIO or a Sr. Admin giving the test, it's probably going to be more about how you react, than what you know. He'll be more interested in how you handle pressure, what your solution would be to a specific task, (as opposed to the Microsoft or Cisco way,) and how well you actually use the knowledge you already have. Just remember, answer the questions honestly, don't try to fake knowing something you don't. Pretending you know something gets you discredited in a hurry, saying "I don't know, I'd have to look it up or ask someone who knows" can get you a lot of respect from co-workers and employers.

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  • eMeSeMeS Member Posts: 1,875
    flurrball wrote:
    I have been spamming my resume EVERYWHERE, and I just got a call back from a resort, they want to administer an IT Test. I played it cool on the phone and made an appointment for tomorrow morning, but I am really nervous.

    I just got my CCENT and I'm studying for CCNA so I should be up on the networking stuff, but I got my A+ years ago, and I'm not really sure what to expect. The job is a System Analyst I position, so I'm guessing it will encompass more than just networking, is it even worth it to brain **** for a day? What kinds of questions are even usually asked with IT Tests? Is it simple ones like where do you insert memory sticks for upgrades, or hard ones?
    Just stressing a little, I need a job pretty badly, and don't want to mess it up. Anyone with advice or experience is appreciated.

    Did they give you a specific name of the IT Test, or is it something they invented in-house? If it is the latter I would be concerned.

    First, there are so many vendors of valid and EEOC approved test instruments that I don't understand why a company would develop such a thing in-house (and really, isn't the point of independent certification to validate some level of knowledge?).

    Second, this is typically a touchy subject with the EEOC, one particular point I remember is that test instruments used in hiring should not be casually created or adopted by people who know little or nothing about building tests.

    http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/factemployment_procedures.html

    If it is a valid selection instrument, then they should be able to tell you the name of it, and you should be able to find approved study material.

    The argument by an employer that has built their own tests will be that dumping and cheating is rampant in certs, and they can't be trusted. On the other hand, they will say that the in-house test is more secure. However a candidate could just as easily find someone who works or worked there or someone else that has access would supply the test information.

    Seems easier, less costly and less risky to me to just verify the certifications.

    MS
  • draineydrainey Member Posts: 261
    I wouldn't stress about it. Work on your interview skills and research the company so you can impress them that you cared enough to learn what you could about the company. Also the research can help you form one or two good questions about how does IT integrate with ...(insert company specific function/goal). This usually impresses potential employeers.

    One company I interviewed with never mentioned a test until, like Undomeil, we reached that point in the interview and I was taken to a seperate room and given the test. Said test however was only 15 questions most of which were low level and very easy to answer. The big thing most companies are looking for with this kind of test is how do you handle stress (test), how well (and creatively, logically) you think, and if it's entry level they probably will be looking to asses your customer service skills as you most likely will be dealing with end-users of some kind.

    Good Luck.
    The irony truly is strange that you're the only one you can change. -- Anthony Gomes
  • steve_fsteve_f Member Posts: 97 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I have had 2 interviews this week, both with tech tests.

    One was divided into 5 sections, DOS, XP, Office, Server 2003, SQL Server
    On the SQL server page I just wrote "no experience in this area"

    They told me later, that the test wasn't pass/fail, and they didn't expect me to know a lot of server/SQL stuff for the job I was applying for.

    They also told me that if I did TOO well on the exam, they wouldn't hire me, because they didn't want someone overqualified.

    My current employer uses the same test for 1st, 2nd and 3rd line support interviews.

    Bottom line, if the job description sounds like something you can do, the test should be easy for you. And don't worry if you don't know all the answers. Hope this helps.
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