College major?

ecceneccen Member Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
Hello everybody, I just got my MCSE couple days ago and would like to major in relating field...

My current major is Electrical Engineering and it is interesting for sure... but I am getting feeling that it is not what I want to do. Past 6 months, I looked into Microsoft Certifications and yea, I am MCP/MCSA/MCSE now and find it more interesting than E/E stuff.

So... which major would be great for networking field? I am at the first year in a college and am really considering changing my major.

Comments

  • blackguymdblackguymd Member Posts: 54 ■■□□□□□□□□
    Computer Information Systems
    Management Information Systems
    Computer InformatioN technology
    Network Security
    Information systems
    Information technology
  • kicker22kicker22 Member Posts: 80 ■■□□□□□□□□
    nice! to do mcse in 6 months..from scratch..
    but anyway, I would say go for CIS :)
    but make sure you pick a right school for that major..
  • ecceneccen Member Posts: 2 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Thanks for the reply but those are considered as minor courses in most schools... I wonder if I can take Computer Science as major and an IT course as minor.

    However, I am not really into those programming stuff so not sure about Computer Science either. Argh!
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    I agree with Kicker. CIS. You will learn databases along with networking and some programming. Learn SQL and .NET.
  • dmafteidmaftei Member Posts: 83 ■■□□□□□□□□
    eccen wrote:
    I wonder if I can take Computer Science as major and an IT course as minor.
    You definitely can, but you cannot avoid programming... Programming is cool, though, you might end up liking it.
    BSEE, MSCS
    www.maftei.net
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    Please be sure of the different between Computer Science and an MIS degree. A lot of people lump MIS in with Computer Science, even though they are almost unrelated fields. With an MCSE, I would recommend going for an MIS degree. Lots of college are beginning to offer bachelors in MIS.

    Just in case you aren't sure what the difference is, I'll try to explain. With Computer Science, you get into lots of math and heavy programming and not too much system administration. CS basically gears you towards software development. MIS degree are business oriented degree with concentrations in Management Information Systems. You will generally take classes from a broad area such as Networking, Programming, and Systems Analysis. This leads you towards Network Administration or business-oriented IT jobs. This is the route I'm taking.

    Hope this helped.
  • ChadaeChadae Member Posts: 65 ■■□□□□□□□□
    When i was in college my original major was Computer Science...but at my 2nd year, I took a concentration in Information Systems track. This was the best for me b/c it had business courses...such as accounting, system analysis to name a few...and it also had some programming courses. So to me, that was the best track!
  • ChadaeChadae Member Posts: 65 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I wonder if I can take Computer Science as major and an IT course as minor.

    However, I am not really into those programming stuff so not sure about Computer Science either. Argh!

    Oh and my minor was Webmaster...interestingly enough- providing that I dont even create webpages anymore. I agree with demaftei-- i dont think there is a way around the programming with CS. Programming wasnt that bad though :)
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    Programming is an inevitable part of IT. If you are an Admin somewhere, you will be writing some code. Whether it's a program your boss wants you to write or just something to make your job easier.
    Plus, it's fun. ;)
  • MindrakerMindraker Member Posts: 25 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Heh I was a German major with an International Studies minor...
    Long live the liberal arts grads! icon_lol.gif
    Anyways, let's just say life has taken a "turn or two".
  • gojericho0gojericho0 Member Posts: 1,060
    University of Pittsburgh as a great Information Science Program. I have taken courses in Telecommunications, Internet Construction, Database Analysis and Design, Systems Analysis and Design, Web Development, Data Structures in C and OOP in C++. You could also just do your EE major and goto grad school for Telecommunications. Pitt and Colorodo also have great telecom grade programs. PM me if you have any questions about Pitt's program
  • ajs1976ajs1976 Member Posts: 1,945
    Watch out for the "Management Information Systems" programs. It might be a business program and will have little to do with computer topics. Make sure the MIS is "Management of Information Systems."

    Whatever major you pick, don't choose it on title alone and what other people say they think the program is about. Dig in to the course requirements and descriptions and pick a major based on your interests and needs.
    Andy

    2017 Goals: 1 of 5 courses complete, 0 of 2 exams complete
  • bjuarbebjuarbe Member Posts: 29 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Well Im currently a Computer Network Operations major at my school. Its a associate degree program. I finish in december, Im looking for a school where i can get a bach. in a equilvalent field of study, Which im having trouble finding. Im also thinking about getting my bach. in a buisness field. So i can have 2 different degrees so i can be more useful?
    Any and all help and will be appreciated. I live in NY if anyone knows any schools...
    Theres JUSToneBOBBY!
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    Concerning bachelors. You're really only going to find Business degrees tailored towards IT. There really aren't any (not from what I've seen anywa) "Networking" bachelors degrees or anything such as that. Though business wouldn't be that bad. I was concerned about the same thing and have talked to multiple professors and even the Admin here. All say that having a bachelors in business wouldn't hurt a thing. It would give you the opportunity to advance. Though I would always compliment the degree with certs. Hope this helps.
  • Ten9t6Ten9t6 Member Posts: 691
    I am currently finishing up my BSIT so I can get started on a Masters in information security..... If you like the security side of Networking...a degree in finance would be good also. That way you could work towards your CPA. I know a lot of CPAs that are being recruited to fill security positions. I am currently training one that holds a position that I would like with the government, doing Information Security.

    Just a thought...
    Kenny

    A+, Network+, Linux+, Security+, MCSE+I, MCSE:Security, MCDBA, CCNP, CCDP, CCSP, CCVP, CCIE Written (R/S, Voice),INFOSEC, JNCIA (M and FWV), JNCIS (M and FWV), ENA, C|EH, ACA, ACS, ACE, CTP, CISSP, SSCP, MCIWD, CIWSA
  • bighuskerbighusker Member Posts: 147
    I'm going for two degrees - Computer Science and Business Administration. I used to be MIS, but it was a little too easy for my tastes. Additionally, it seemed like most of the IS-specific classes were a bunch of theoretical jargon and not much practical training/knowledge. I took a "Business Data Communications" class which was supposed to be about networking, and I don't think we ever even talked about computer networks. It was more from the standpoint of how to administer/manage a network, which is fine...but if you don't know the first thing about networking, it doesn't do you much good.

    I don't know what it's like at other schools, but MIS is essentially a minor in business and a minor in computer science at my school. Didn't seem like it was really that useful. It would be a lot better if their curriculum was more geared toward getting certifications and such, but that might be the case at other places.

    eccen, does your school offer a major in "Computer Engineering" by any chance? With all the physics and math classes you have to take as an EE, maybe something like that would be more up your alley? Any type of engineering degree is going to be very well-respected.
  • BackdraftBackdraft Member Posts: 16 ■□□□□□□□□□
    Depending on how you feel about distance learning or traveling, there are several schools that offer Bachelors degrees in networking related and Info Tech fields. First is Davenport University www.davenport.edu Also look at Peirce College in Philly, www.peirce.edu and Drexel University www.drexel.edu for the actual school, and www.drexel.com for distance learning. Finally, Franklin College of Ohio offers one in Info Tech through distance & on site. www.franklin.edu
  • turtlenodheadturtlenodhead Inactive Imported Users Posts: 28 ■■□□□□□□□□
    bighusker wrote:
    eccen, does your school offer a major in "Computer Engineering" by any chance? With all the physics and math classes you have to take as an EE, maybe something like that would be more up your alley? Any type of engineering degree is going to be very well-respected.

    I'm from computer engineer. And the way I see it, computer engineer is all theory and nothing practical. And with the courses, almost all the course are mandatory.

    The way I see it, computer engineer is more into theory and implementation of computer, computer science is more into usage of computer.
  • bighuskerbighusker Member Posts: 147
    bighusker wrote:
    eccen, does your school offer a major in "Computer Engineering" by any chance? With all the physics and math classes you have to take as an EE, maybe something like that would be more up your alley? Any type of engineering degree is going to be very well-respected.

    I'm from computer engineer. And the way I see it, computer engineer is all theory and nothing practical. And with the courses, almost all the course are mandatory.

    The way I see it, computer engineer is more into theory and implementation of computer, computer science is more into usage of computer.

    Erm...I'm not sure I agree. Computer Engineering, like most Engineering disciplines, is completely comprehensive and consists of both theoretical and practical applications. By definition, engineers are people who implement and create...so there certainly is a lot of practicality associated with it. A Computer Engineering degree is going to qualify you for *a lot* of computer-related fields.

    And as a computer science major, I can tell you that CS has very little to do with "usage of computers." It's all about programming, algorithms, and math. It's almost more of a mathematically-related field than technological. In that regard, there's also a lot of mathematical theory involved with CS (especially calculus).

    CIS/MIS is much more about "usage of computers", especially from the business side of things.
  • garv221garv221 Member Posts: 1,914
    bighusker:


    I agree with your above post. CS is mostly theory and databases. Engineering is more geared toward the network design and project management of technology. Theoretically if you were to take jobs right out of college based on degrees in CS and Commuter engineering the CS guy would be cooped up in a cube writing code. The Computer Engineer would be into some network implementation and management. That turtle-whatever doesn't get it & has it backwards....
  • turtlenodheadturtlenodhead Inactive Imported Users Posts: 28 ■■□□□□□□□□
    garv221 wrote:
    bighusker:


    I agree with your above post. CS is mostly theory and databases. Engineering is more geared toward the network design and project management of technology. Theoretically if you were to take jobs right out of college based on degrees in CS and Commuter engineering the CS guy would be cooped up in a cube writing code. The Computer Engineer would be into some network implementation and management. That turtle-whatever doesn't get it & has it backwards....

    I mean CS would touch things such as SQL, OPENGL, no such thing in Computer engineering.

    My OS course and compiler course are actually course on writing a compiler and OS. The way I see it is it's not too practical.

    You do get really good fundamental concept which should help you later in your career though.
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