Call Me Crazy

stlsmoorestlsmoore Member Posts: 515 ■■■□□□□□□□
Has anyone on here studied a particular topic without taking the actual exams for them? The reason why I ask is that I really want to learn about more of the Microsoft Server topics but I dispise the actual exam taking part. Even though I'm about to take the 70-270 exam next week I'm not sure if I want to put so much time, effort, and stress on getting the actual certs at this moment.

I figure I can come back after a few years and get the updated Microsoft Cert's since it'll be more relevant. I already have a really good job, I'm just in a junior type of role but I want to fill in the gaps with server administration. What I'm really interested in is the Cisco type of stuff but I want get my head wrapped around more of the Microsoft stuff before I do. I must be crazy for going through all self learning and not wanting to have anything to show for it icon_lol.gif I'll end using must of the stuff I learn at my job though.
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Comments

  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    You're contractually obligated to make at least one attempt. It's in the license agreement for any exam-related study material.

    I'm sure it's fairly common for people to do that. There are a lot of kick-ass IT personnel that have few, if any, certifications. I think we just don't hear about that a lot since this is an certification-oriented site.
  • stlsmoorestlsmoore Member Posts: 515 ■■■□□□□□□□
    MoreYouKnow.jpg

    But seriously I guess it wouldn't hurt to attempt the exams...well besides my bank account.
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  • HeroPsychoHeroPsycho Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,940
    It doesn't make any sense to gain the knowledge necessary to take the exam, and then not taking. You're only robbing yourself.
    Good luck to all!
  • seuss_ssuesseuss_ssues Member Posts: 629
    HeroPsycho wrote:
    It doesn't make any sense to gain the knowledge necessary to take the exam, and then not taking. You're only robbing yourself.

    Well I can't say that I completely agree with that statement. The knowledge he gains can help him at his job or help him find a job. I do agree however that if you do sufficiently learn the materials well enough to become certified that it doesnt hurt to have that bullet on your resume.

    Unfortunately in my experience it would be hard to casually learn enough information to get your MCSE without extensive experience, specifically studying the test material, or cheating.
  • HeroPsychoHeroPsycho Inactive Imported Users Posts: 1,940
    HeroPsycho wrote:
    It doesn't make any sense to gain the knowledge necessary to take the exam, and then not taking. You're only robbing yourself.

    Well I can't say that I completely agree with that statement. The knowledge he gains can help him at his job or help him find a job. I do agree however that if you do sufficiently learn the materials well enough to become certified that it doesnt hurt to have that bullet on your resume.

    Unfortunately in my experience it would be hard to casually learn enough information to get your MCSE without extensive experience, specifically studying the test material, or cheating.

    There's no question the knowledge will benefit him, but the cert helps validate to current and future employers he knows it. He can know it and be certified.

    I would understand if he's learning just enough to complete a project or whatever, but learning it to comprehend it means gaining what you pretty much need to get certified.
    Good luck to all!
  • stlsmoorestlsmoore Member Posts: 515 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Yea the environment I work in is def. a complete Microsoft environment. I know that the things I'll learn will help me tremendously at my current job. Just to give you an example at our site (there are 6 all together all over the United States) we have easily 100 servers with about 20-30 being SQL servers alone.

    I'm not sure what servers does what yet because I've only been here for 4 months but I do know that just by studying the 70-270 that I've implemented just about everything on that test at this job already. From setting up RIS images to creating MSI files and pushing them through a GPO. I love actually doing the material at my job and even labbing it up at home is almost a hobby (don't know rather that's sad or not)!
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  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    Not everyone goes for the certification-path. For both Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2008, you can find resource-kits that are "general knowledge", which don't necessarily track to an exam. These books are more like operations manuals, rather than textbooks.

    In a perfect world, we'd all learn everything about the technology we work with, and use all our toys to their full potential. Certifications, as I see it, are a way of learning a more about particular topics. Often times, I find myself going "I'd have never known that" about something I study for a test, and usually I find myself putting the knowledge to good use simply by virtue of having been made aware that the option exists.

    There's nothing stopping you from learning independently and simply working with Windows, or any other piece of IT software or hardware. The risk you run is that you'll pigeon-hole yourself, and only learn the specific pieces you need to do your day-to-day tasks, potentially missing out on the full set of features available to you or other goodies you'd never have known about if they weren't part of a structured curriculum. The other end of it, while you may not "need" to be an MCSE to be a systems administrator, is that the certification is highly recognized in the IT industry. Lots of people I know obtained the cert after having hiring managers ask the magic question, "If you know so much, why can't you pass those tests?". It's not a fair position to be put in, but it happens all too often.

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  • undomielundomiel Member Posts: 2,818
    Only thing I've done that for so far is the Network+. I studied for it for a while but then realized that the Security+ would better fulfill my long term goals so switched over to studying for that. But generally if I'm going to study for an exam I plan to get that exam knocked out. It would require special circumstances for me not to do it.
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  • NetAdmin2436NetAdmin2436 Member Posts: 1,076
    stlsmoore wrote:
    Call Me Crazy

    Ok, Your crazy. icon_wink.gif

    Is is just that you get stressed out before test taking time? Any other reasons? Money?

    I would seriously reconsider and just take the tests. Ask if your employer will help pay for them. That might ease your mind knowing your employer is there to help financially at least and might give you more motivation and confidence to take the exams.
    WIP: CCENT/CCNA (.....probably)
  • pwjohnstonpwjohnston Member Posts: 441
    dynamik wrote:
    You're contractually obligated to make at least one attempt. It's in the license agreement for any exam-related study material.

    WTF, really? Those sneaky bastards.
  • stlsmoorestlsmoore Member Posts: 515 ■■■□□□□□□□
    stlsmoore wrote:
    Call Me Crazy

    Ok, Your crazy. icon_wink.gif

    Is is just that you get stressed out before test taking time? Any other reasons? Money?

    I would seriously reconsider and just take the tests. Ask if your employer will help pay for them. That might ease your mind knowing your employer is there to help financially at least and might give you more motivation and confidence to take the exams.

    Naw I don't really get stressed out I just want to learn the material and not have to sift through those crazy Microsoft questions that they give you to be certified. Well maybe the tests won't be as bad as I think, I'm taking my first test for the 70-270 Tuesday so depending on how that goes I'll go ahead and read through those long drawn out questions. I know the material pretty well I've used training videos, MS press book, Sybex book, labs, you name it. I do ok on the practice tests like 80% range usually.
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  • stlsmoorestlsmoore Member Posts: 515 ■■■□□□□□□□
    Well I took the 70-270 and it wasn't to bad I'm going to go ahead and keep pushing forward and finish with my MCSA since I'm halfway there.
    My Cisco Blog Adventure: http://shawnmoorecisco.blogspot.com/

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  • dynamikdynamik Banned Posts: 12,314 ■■■■■■■■□□
    And then you might as well go for your MCSE since you'll be halfway there!

    Congratulations!
  • LifelongLearnerLifelongLearner Member Posts: 45 ■■□□□□□□□□
    I've come across that dilema myself but in the end I chose to go take the exams. I found that studying and reading are totally different things. If I know I'm going to be sitting an exam (and paying for it!! icon_evil.gificon_lol.gif ) I will study harder which has the consequence of making me understand the material in more depth (and all the material not only what I want to concentrate on).

    We get certified to show the employer that we know our stuff. That's another reason we get certified or else why bother? Of course its more pleasurable to just gain knowledge to apply it our jobs as we need it, but we also know the IT industry doesn't work that way.
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