2500 and 2600 release dates?

TalicTalic Member Posts: 423
Exactly how old are Cisco's 2500 and 2600 series routers? The only source I could find said it was 1996.

I went over to a office today that was cleaning to move and they had a 2520. They wanted $75 for it and I offered them $40 for it. I think $40 was reasonable but they just took my number and they said they'll get back to me if no one else wanted it. They also had a Linksys switch there, I'm not sure how many ports it had but hopefully they'll want to get rid of it later on too.

So what kind of pricing do you guys go by when picking up equipment from liquidating businesses? Something reasonably close to ebay pricing? I didn't want to go higher on that router since how old the equipment is but I like to know the dates when haggling with people.

Comments

  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    I believe 1996 is accurate for the 2500 series, and the 2600s came out about two or three years later, (I'm sure some of the more hardcore Cisco gurus can give you more accurate timeframes than that). Keep in mind, though, that when these devices were still being sold directly from Cisco, they ran in the same price-range as current, equivalent equipment. Paying anywhere from several hundred to several thousand dollars for something brand-new, it isn't unreasonable to want $75 for it, even if it's obsolete and well past end-of-life. Just a little perspective to keep in mind when approaching businesses about buying their equipment. icon_wink.gif

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  • TalicTalic Member Posts: 423
    Slowhand wrote:
    I believe 1996 is accurate for the 2500 series, and the 2600s came out about two or three years later, (I'm sure some of the more hardcore Cisco gurus can give you more accurate timeframes than that). Keep in mind, though, that when these devices were still being sold directly from Cisco, they ran in the same price-range as current, equivalent equipment. Paying anywhere from several hundred to several thousand dollars for something brand-new, it isn't unreasonable to want $75 for it, even if it's obsolete and well past end-of-life. Just a little perspective to keep in mind when approaching businesses about buying their equipment. icon_wink.gif

    I'll keep that in mind but I'm also a college student that has to worry about their tuition icon_wink.gif

    I have a off-topic question, with rolled cables, is this http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=103&cp_id=10311&cs_id=1031104&p_id=3726&seq=1&format=2 the right converter for it?
  • /usr/usr Member Posts: 1,768
    $75 is a good deal if you could have literally taken it with you right then (no shipping).

    They still go for $80 to $100+ on ebay.
  • SlowhandSlowhand MCSE: Cloud Platform and Infrastructure, MCSA: Windows Server 2003/2012/2016, CCNA Routing & Switchi Bay Area, CaliforniaMod Posts: 5,163 Mod
    Talic wrote:
    I'll keep that in mind but I'm also a college student that has to worry about their tuition icon_wink.gif
    Just remember that you have to think on a professional playing field when dealing with companies, not like a college student. I'm not going to discourage you from bargaining, but keep in mind that when you're talking to IT managers or Ops managers about their equipment, they aren't concerned with your budget, their primary concern is with their own. Talk them down on the value of the product, and the time they'd waste trying to sell it, and be sure to stay off the topics of "I need/my budget doesn't allow for that much". I had a co-worker that developed a reputation as a gold-digger with his clients because they felt like he wanted a low price on their old flat-panel monitors because he'd said he couldn't afford to buy them new, and now they refuse to sell their used equipment to him at any kind of reasonable price. It's easy to get burned, so you have to use little sales-tricks to get on the right foot with some of these guys.
    Talic wrote:
    I have a off-topic question, with rolled cables, is this http://www.monoprice.com/products/product.asp?c_id=103&cp_id=10311&cs_id=1031104&p_id=3726&seq=1&format=2 the right converter for it?
    That's the right converter to connect to a router or switch via a USB port. My old laptop didn't have a serial port either, so I picked up that exact cable. So far, I haven't had any problems with it, so I highly recommend it.

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  • TalicTalic Member Posts: 423
    Slowhand wrote:
    Talic wrote:
    I'll keep that in mind but I'm also a college student that has to worry about their tuition icon_wink.gif
    Just remember that you have to think on a professional playing field when dealing with companies, not like a college student. I'm not going to discourage you from bargaining, but keep in mind that when you're talking to IT managers or Ops managers about their equipment, they aren't concerned with your budget, their primary concern is with their own. Talk them down on the value of the product, and the time they'd waste trying to sell it, and be sure to stay off the topics of "I need/my budget doesn't allow for that much". I had a co-worker that developed a reputation as a gold-digger with his clients because they felt like he wanted a low price on their old flat-panel monitors because he'd said he couldn't afford to buy them new, and now they refuse to sell their used equipment to him at any kind of reasonable price. It's easy to get burned, so you have to use little sales-tricks to get on the right foot with some of these guys.

    I'll keep that in mind, thanks for the tip.

    I didn't tell them my budget so I don't think that would of hurt me but it was harder to talk them down since they looked the model up on the internet and found some companies that were selling refurbished units in the $200 range.

    I think I'll just use the lab at one of my college's campuses, this home lab stuff can get out of hand. The campus may be a 30 minute drive or so but it'll save the headache of buying everything.

    I bought that little Cisco 91 SOHO router off ebay so that should be enough to play with until I go to the college lab.
  • TalicTalic Member Posts: 423
    Another thing I forgot to ask, is there any differences between a Linksys switch and a Cisco switch? Other then Cisco switches have more ports? I believe the Linksys has either 12 or 24 ports and VPN.
  • mgeorgemgeorge Member Posts: 777
    The 2500 Series was introduced in 1993,
    3600 in 1996
    2600 in March of 1998
    There is no place like 127.0.0.1
  • TalicTalic Member Posts: 423
    mgeorge wrote:
    The 2500 Series was introduced in 1993,
    3600 in 1996
    2600 in March of 1998

    Wow that's old.
    That's weird that the 3600 is older then the 2600 series.
  • mgeorgemgeorge Member Posts: 777
    If you want to see an OLD router then check out this bad baby;

    http://www.knossos.net.nz/don/wn1.html
    There is no place like 127.0.0.1
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