Real life (@ work) networking question

SurferdudeHBSurferdudeHB Posts: 199Member ■■■□□□□□□□
Ok so we just got this new subnet assigned to us and for some reason, one of the workstation cannot be pinged.


address of station is 10.201.30.220

the gateway is 10.201.30.1

and I'm assigning this station a static IP address (requested). So if I go to another station, I can't ping 10.201.30.220 but from .220 I can ping other stations within the same subnet(on DHCP).

Also on .220 I can't go out of the network on the Internet.

Not sure what I'm missing here..

Comments

  • /usr/usr Posts: 1,768Member
    What is your subnet mask? I am assuming /24, but I was just making sure.

    Are you sure you're not missing something with the static configuration, or that the DHCP clients are properly configured?

    Is the firewall turned on, on the workstation?

    I'm just throwing stuff out there...I really don't have a good enough picture of your network to begin guessing with any certainty.
  • amp2030amp2030 Posts: 253Member
    Software firewall?

    Edit: /usr beat me to it.
  • LBC90805LBC90805 Posts: 247Member
    Could be there is a subnet mismatch some where along the line.
  • SurferdudeHBSurferdudeHB Posts: 199Member ■■■□□□□□□□
    You guys are awesome! It was the firewall!


    Good excercise though thank you!
  • KaminskyKaminsky Posts: 1,235Member
    You guys are awesome! It was the firewall!


    Good excercise though thank you!


    Yep, that's a sneaky little bugger that one...
    Kam.
  • NetwurkNetwurk Posts: 1,155Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    You guys are awesome! It was the firewall!


    Good excercise though thank you!
    Kaminsky wrote: »
    Yep, that's a sneaky little bugger that one...

    Yes, Microsoft and the mainstream AV/Security vendors have decided to block ICMP by default.

    I would say that 99% of their customers don't need to worry about things like the ping of death attack, but by golly Microsoft blocked ICMP and the other lemming vendors lined right up and blocked it too.

    Nowadays every network student should know how to block/unblock ICMP for the XP/2003 and Vista/2008 OSes. Otherwise you'll spend way too much time troubleshooting a router issue that is really a workstation and/or server issue.
  • KaminskyKaminsky Posts: 1,235Member
    it's remembering to unlock it for testing that's the problem.

    ICMP being off does slow down the little spotty geeks sitting there in their weak old, crusty underpants just trying to look around to see what else they can go play with next.

    Fire up wireshark and multicast ping your subnet across your isp (224.0.0.1) and see what responds. Then just pray they are all downloading p*rn and leaving you alone.
    Kam.
  • cisco_troopercisco_trooper Too many Posts: 1,443Member ■■■■□□□□□□
    Kaminsky wrote: »
    it's remembering to unlock it for testing that's the problem.

    ICMP being off does slow down the little spotty geeks sitting there in their weak old, crusty underpants just trying to look around to see what else they can go play with next.

    Fire up wireshark and multicast ping your subnet across your isp (224.0.0.1) and see what responds. Then just pray they are all downloading p*rn and leaving you alone.

    LOL. Nice. Now I know why I know why I ACL multicast addresses on certain interfaces.
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